Boston City Councilor At-Large

Incumbents are indicated with *

Jump to:

About the Candidate

Policy Proposals

Additional Questions

Priscilla Flint Banks
(no answers submitted)

Domingos DaRosa
(no answers submitted)

Michel Denis
(pdf of answers)

Annissa Essaibi-George*
(pdf of answers)

Michael Flaherty*
(pdf of answers)

Althea Garrison*
(no answers submitted)

David Halbert
(pdf of answers)

Martin Keogh
(no answers submitted)

William King
(pdf of answers)

Herb Alexander Lozano
(no answers submitted)

Julia Mejia
(pdf of answers)

Erin Murphy
(pdf of answers)

Jeff Ross
(pdf of answers)

Alejandra St.Guillen
(pdf of answers)

Michelle Wu*
(pdf of answers)

About the Candidate

1. How do you move around your community and get to where you need to go?

2. What is a particularly dangerous problem or location in your community for people walking, biking, taking transit, or for people with disabilities that you'd like to see addressed?

3. Why do you think people who care about walking, biking, transit, and mobility issues should vote for you?

Michel Denis

I walk. I run. I bike. I drive.

The corner of Morton street and Blue Hill Avenue. I would like to see Comm Ave and Brighton Avenue get a dedicated bus and bike lane. I would also like to address the lack of bus and bike lanes in both Mattapan and Hyde Park. I support the bike lane improvements scheduled for Hyde Park, and last but not least, I would like to see bike lanes added throughout Dorchester Avenue, and Massachusetts Avenue.

I am the only Boston City Council At Large Candidate who believes in writing that walking, biking, and EV electric vehicles are the key to making sure Boston reaches our city wide carbon neutral goals by 2030, by actively encouraging more Green Transportation through proven government models already in place in countries like Spain and China. It is time that Boston becomes a leader in Green Transportation in America, and once elected, I will make it a priority to integrate Boston Public School curriculum, Boston 311, and BTD, in a new pilot program in partnership with DCR and the MBTA.

Annissa Essaibi-George

I use different modes of transportation to get around my community, to work, and community events. When I am transporting my four boys to sports and school events, and when I commute in to City Hall, I usually drive.
When I travel from City Hall to community events during the work day, I often walk or take public transportation.

Our transportation infrastructure is entirely car-centric, relegating pedestrians, bikes, and other mode of transportation to the “extra space” after car lanes and parking space have been allocated. Further, distracted drivers pose a tremendous risk to non-car users of all kinds. Though the city has used pylons and markers, one of the most dangerous places to be in the city is in a bike lane or crosswalk. We need to take every action possible to refocus drivers and improve safety for non-car users.

I have been a strong proponent for investing in infrastructure and programming to make Boston safer and easier to travel. I have supported the creation of Bus Rapid Transit (BRT), more funding for protected bike lanes, and other important traffic calming measures. I advocated for and the budget was increased this year to include a Crash Analyst to work with the BPD & BTD to analyze accidents and make recommendations to improve safety after an incident. I have joined Councilor Wu in fighting MBTA fare increases. I have fully embraced Vision Zero and will continue my advocacy when re-elected.

Michael Flaherty

As an At-large City Councilor, a normal day includes meetings in all corners of the city, most of the time on a tight timeline. As such, I generally drive or carpool with staff to each of these meetings. I try to take the T when it is practical for my schedule, but this is a constant reminder that we need to improve the quality of public transportation in Boston so that the use of a car is not a necessity for reliable cross-city travel.

As a Boston City Councilor At-Large, I have seen and/or heard from residents about the following locations:
1) The intersection between the Reggie Lewis Track and Athletic Center and Roxbury Crossing - extending onto Malcolm X Blvd.
2) L Street in South Boston.
3) Tremont St and Washington St, particularly during rush hours.
4) Along Centre Street, especially past the Arborway, JP leading into West Roxbury.
5) Crossing Commonwealth Ave and Beacon Street.
6) Speeding all across the city.

I have seen firsthand the daily frustrations of Boston residents and commuters as the region is plagued by traffic and our public transportation system continues to provide unacceptable levels of service. I am willing to support any method with the proper research behind it that can alleviate any of these transit issues. These include protected bike lanes, lower speed limits, illuminated and raised crosswalks, speed bumps, and road diets. We also need to work with the state to improve the MBTA across the board.

David Halbert

I use a combination of methods depending on where I am going and when. Currently I primarily travel via my personal vehicle due to logistical demands as a city wide candidate. I prefer to utilize public transportation or walk whenever possible.

The section of Morton Street (state route 203) from just west of the intersection of Morton and Harvard, until Cemetary Road in Jamaica Plain is very dangerous. This is a high speed, heavily trafficked thoroughfare that has no protected bike lanes and no sidewalks for pedestrians or those with mobility challenges. In addition to being dangerous, this lack of infrastructure further separates Dorchester/Mattapan from the Forest Hills neighborhood.

I realize that as we make policy recommendations on transportation issues we must prioritize equity as well. Striking this balance means thinking creatively about transportation. For example, I have been a strong advocate for creating more walkable neighborhoods across Boston, with everyday amenities nearby - thus reducing the need for residents to drive as often. I will bring this approach to all transportation discussions on the Council, along with the humility to seek input and assistance from stakeholders as I am not a transit policy expert.

William King

I drive an electric vehicle or I walk depending on the distance traveling.

I have lived on American Legion Hwy my entire life. Amer. Legion has a dangerous crosswalk at the corner of Blue Hill Ave where I have seen multiple people hit and injured. Even if pedestrians have a walk sign cars from Blue Hill fly around the corner taking a right onto the highway. Amer. Legion also has a speed problem. There have been many car crashes that claim lives. Amer. Legion needs raised crosswalks and the digital speedometers so people see their speed and self correct. With 3 schools located here, we need to make this a priority to keep kids safe.

I am someone who will advocate for the safety of our residents who walk and bike and those who commute via MBTA. We can't be a city that pushes for our residents to be environmentally friendly then make it unsafe or a hassle to use other modes of transportation.

Julia Mejia

I rely on my car because my lack of access to public transit essentially forces me to contribute to our city’s worst in the nation traffic and the accompanying environmental/public health risks.

Our public transit system is in complete crisis - it is unreliable and becoming consistently unsafe to ride. The lack of protected bike lanes throughout the city prevents more people from transitioning to biking. Street diets are needed in multiple high traffic neighborhoods to address both congestion and pedestrian safety.

I experience the inequities of mobility in our city and am ready to address these issues. I live in a low income community that doesn’t have easy access to public transit, requiring many folks to get a car just to get to work, leading to more traffic, pollution and accidents on our roads. This enables me to address transit issues from the perspective of income inequality that is necessary to equitably solve these problems and make Boston a city where all of its residents can easily and sustainably move from point A to point B.

Erin Murphy

Walking and by car

Speed enforcement, better sidewalk snow clearance, fix the T

I will work for a new Red Line station in Dorchester and reforming the MBTA

Jeff Ross

Walk, MBTA, Bus, Automobile

There are specific safety issues – dangerous intersections for pedestrians, far too many bicycle fatalities, unacceptable sidewalk conditions for those with disabilities – but if I had to point to one singular danger with the broadest impact, I would have to say the commute. Congestion and traffic seems to present the biggest danger to all road travelers – bike, car, truck, pedestrians. As our traffic issues increase, we’re seeing increased frustration and impatience, and I believe an accompanying economic impact will emerge.

Creative dialogue about transportation options became a tangential benefit of the discussion of Boston hosting the Olympics, and despite the failure of the overall effort, these alternative ideas deserve some level of consideration – such as a gondola from South Boston to South Station, an extension of the Emerald Necklace, or a Boston-Quincy ferry service. I hear the transportation concerns in every single neighborhood in the City. I recognize this as a huge threat to our economic growth and our ability to thrive as a city, and this will be among my highest priorities as your City Councilor.

Alejandra St.Guillen

I generally combine the use of my car with public transportation. I take my son to daycare in Roslindale and thus drive from West Roxbury to Roslindale and then take public transportation if I’m going downtown. Generally, if I’m not going downtown, I will often drive from location to location to limit my travel time. I live very close to a Main Street district and thus am able to walk to places for leisure activities or light shopping.

In my immediate community of West Roxbury, Centre street between Lagrange to South has been a particularly dangerous area for pedestrians. There are two lanes going in each direction and there have been a number of accidents (including fatalities). It’s also not a bike-friendly stretch. As I knock doors across the city, I have found many areas lack proper infrastructure for people with disabilities - sidewalks ending suddenly, sidewalks that nearly impassable with a stroller (as I often have my son with me) and I’m sure extremely dangerous for older people and people with disabilities.

I would be a strong advocate for increased mobility options and safety across the city. My top priorities for advancing sustainability, especially in transit dependent communities will be working with advocates and city/state agencies to upgrade core transportation assets across the city and reinvesting in neglected transportation links, including protected and connected bike lanes.
Failure to find ways to expand access to high-quality transit, as well as alternative mobility options like walking and biking, will mean more pollution, congestion, stunted economic growth, and frustration. 

Michelle Wu

I commute to City Hall from Roslindale (most days with at least one of my kids) by taking the Orange Line from Forest Hills to State Street. A few times per month, we may change to catch the Commuter Rail from Back Bay Station to Roslindale Village on the way home. Since the implementation of the inbound morning rush hour dedicated bus lane on Washington Street, it’s been much easier and more reliable to take any of the buses (34, 34E, 36, etc.) from Roslindale Square to Forest Hills. Outside of this route, I also walk or use public transit or bike share to get to meetings across the city.

Too many streets across Boston are too dangerous for people who rely on them everyday. My shared campaign office is near Dudley Square, and nearly all the streets leading in and out of the area are among those with the worst crash rates, with conditions encouraging speeding and making it difficult to cross in a single cycle. Sadly these conditions are common throughout the city, and the top issue that I hear about when knocking on doors is how dangerous it feels to walk on even our residential streets due to speeding cars trying to avoid horrible traffic on main roads and unsafe street design.

Throughout my tenure on the City Council, I have fought for a more sustainable transportation future. From fighting for investments in cycling infrastructure and improvements in bus service, to helping expand access to youth T passes, to organizing a system-wide canvass of the MBTA alongside a coalition of commuters, advocacy organizations, and elected officials, I have worked to highlight the experiences of communities and people in pushing for transportation solutions focused on equity, scale, and urgency. Transit access and equity is fundamental, and we can't let it be only a state issue.

Top

Policy Proposals

1. How will you ensure implementation of the infrastructure changes needed to slow traffic on your community's streets, and improve crosswalks and intersections to make them safer for people who are walking and using mobility assistive devices?

2. How will you improve the reach, frequency, and quality of public transit in Boston?

3. How will you ensure fast-tracked implementation of a city-wide network of off-street paths and protected bike lanes on major thoroughfares and connecting streets that are safe and comfortable for people of all ages and abilities?

Michel Denis

Once I am elected, I will require that all street and road work projects include upgrades to street cut outs, handicap ramps, speed ramps, bike lanes, and crosswalks. I will also introduce a new city ordinance requiring a reasonable 24 hour timeline for repainting Boston City Cross Walks and Bike Lanes immediately after any city street contract work has been completed, in order to guarantee the safety of all pedestrians and bicyclists.

I am the only Boston City Council At Lange Candidate that has said in writing that I support extending the Blue Line to Lynn, Massachusetts, and extending the Greenline to Somerville, Massachusetts. I am also the only Boston City Council At Large Candidate that has said we need to revisit the MBTA Silverline Study regarding Blue Hill Avenue, from Dudley Square to Mattapan Square, as well as looking for a replacement to replace the old A Train that used to connect Allston/Brighton to Downtown Boston. Currently, the MBTA does not offer wi-fi to the Blue, Red, Green, and Orange Line, only on the Purple Line. Once elected, I am the only Boston City Council At Large Candidate who has said in writing that I would work with the state legislature to require that the MBTA make free wi-fi available to all City of Boston Residents on all Buses and Trains by 2021.

I am the only Boston City Council At Large Candidate who has said in writing that once elected, I would create a city wide neighborhood watch, that would meet monthly with the MBTA, BPD, BTD, and DND about the local crime, traffic concerns, bus schedules, train delays, and community ideas for improvements.

Annissa Essaibi-George

Constituents are most knowledgeable about their block, street, neighborhood and are bet positioned to help us identify where infrastructure can be improved to increase safety. I frequently hear from constituents about trouble spots and we work with BTD and others to improve the infrastructure to address these concerns. The Boston Bike Union and other advocate groups know the trouble spots for bikes and we need to fast-track improvements.

I have advocated for raised crosswalks in front of our schools, especially for elementary schools, at playgrounds, senior housing, and senior centers.

We need to place a greater emphasis on funding projects and initiatives that makes public transportation more accessible in Boston. Our broken public transportation network not only creates commuting to work, school, and moving around ones community much more difficult, but it costs our economy billions of dollars annually, and pushes occasional users of public transit to use their cars – further exacerbating the problem of traffic congestion.

Boston is a world-class city, and we must have a transportation network that matches our reputation. While there are limited measures the City can take to fix the broken MBTA, I still have used my role as a City Councilor as a bully pulpit to advocate for significant capital investments in train infrastructure.

I have and will continued to advocate for BRT through our commercial corridors, increased City investments in making our streets, sidewalks, and bike paths safer, better connected, and more accessible.

We also need to evaluate the frequency of resetting our traffic signal system across the City. This will help the flow of traffic, properly slow traffic and increase the transit network in particular for buses and the Green Line.

Boston lags behind many other major cities, because we do not prioritize off-street paths and protected lanes. Boston is an old city and our streets are tight, but we can work within our older design to identify main thoroughfares for bikes, much like the Southwest Corridor, to get bikes their own space. Two examples of this are the Harborwalk in Dorchester (around the gas tank) which would open one corridor to the south and adding protected lanes to Mass Ave to Melnea Cass to accommodate a high volume of bike traffic. Realigning our urban highways, like Rutherford Ave in Charlestown would connect Downtown to the North. The realignment of the Pike in Allston will allow for a connection to West Station, Brighton, and beyond. More immediately, reducing lanes and implementing curbs like they are doing on Commonwealth Avenue near Boston University on our wide streets such as Summer Street in South Boston and Melnea Cass Blvd would lead to more dedicated, complete, off street networks.

Michael Flaherty

A defining feature of the Vision Zero strategy in the City of Boston is the Neighborhood Slow Streets Program. Since its launch in 2017, the Neighborhood Slow Streets program is gradually extending into high traffic areas of the city. I have supported, and will continue to support, every neighborhood’s efforts to implement safety-oriented measures that enable and empower healthier communities.

We also need to look at more long-term sustainable budget solutions so that Slow Streets programming opportunities are available on a more equal and equitable level in every neighborhood. Further, I am supportive of building a more robust data framework for Vision Zero updates so that residents can better track the progress of current projects. The creation of a comprehensive map of completed and ongoing projects with clear benchmarks to track progress through the “zero” goal year of 2030 would bring greater accountability and transparency to the process.

The MBTA is one of the lifelines of our city; when it doesn’t work, our city doesn’t function properly. The recent derailments and technical difficulties served as a painful reminder of that. Our residents’ ability to go about their daily lives relies on a reliable public transit network. These minimum standards have not been met by the MBTA, and this fare hike creates an additional access barrier for commuters. Boston contributes $85.8 million to the local assessment revenues of the MBTA — more than half of the total local assessment revenues collected annually, and yet our residents are not being sufficiently served.
Despite the city’s hefty financial investment in the MBTA, we have no vote on the MBTA budget and no representation on the Fiscal and Management Control Board. Restoring Boston’s role in the decision-making processes of the MBTA is an essential step to fixing the issues that have plagued the system for decades. It is incumbent upon the MBTA to give Boston’s residents a voice in the ongoing conversation about how to fix our ailing public transportation system. Boston's residents and taxpayers deserve it. I have co-sponsored a hearing order to address these concerns.

I will continue to advocate for these important transit solutions on the City Council, particularly in the budget process, as I have done in the past. During this past budget season, I supported and voted for an increase in the capital budget for the Strategic Bike Network from $1.25 million to $4 million and increase Vision Zero funding from $3.9 million to $12 million.

David Halbert

As a member of the Council I will seek to see the body's Post Audit and Oversight Committee reconstituted and as to serve as Chair. I believe that the mandate of this committee, to review government operations and expenditures, is germane to the goal of seeking safer streets as it allows for precise and specific inquiry into what efforts the City has taken to achieve this goal and what the overall efficacy of those efforts has been. The information gathered by this type of inquiry can serve as a concrete building block for future proposals and performance review.

In addition I would make the goal of traffic-calmed streets a key component of any and all discussions with the city's transportation department. This would include conversations during the annual budgeting process - and would also be informed by the data from the Post Audit hearings in the 2nd year of the term and moving forward.

I will work with my fellow Councilors and the Mayor to promote all city-based efforts to increase public transit access and use. This would include streetscape and roadway redesign where appropriate; creating the necessary infrastructure to support bus rapid transit; and seeking to have Boston's voice reflected directly in MBTA leadership conversations, either via a city specific seat on the Board or through robust participation in a Community Advisory Committee similar to what exists with MassPort. I would also seek to work in as close a collaborative fashion as possible with Boston's state legislative delegation, since so many conversations around public transit - particularly funding - are decided at the state level. In order for Boston to achieve its full public transit potential it is critical that City Hall and the State House work together.

In order to reach this goal I will first work with advocates to engage residents at the local level to determine what connections will work best for their respective neighborhoods. As the contours and impacts on different parts of the city will be felt in very different ways. As this information is being compiled I will work with the necessary stakeholders in city government to determine how to most effectively and efficiently implement the findings once they are concluded - with realistic timetables set for accelerated establishment of this network determined and agreed to from the outset. I will also use my position and public profile to bring attention to the plan, via media and in communities, so that the general public becomes allies in maintaining the necessary pressure to keep the plan on track and accountable.

William King

As councilor, I will work with the Public Works Dept. at the City to institute raised crosswalks, street posted digital speedometers, and sidewalk changes to cut down on distances pedestrians must walk.

The MBTA is a state function which needs the support of Boston residents to ensure effective operation. As councillor, I will work with the city delegation at the state house to demand adequate representation for Boston transit equity.

I would partner with advocates like the Boston Cyclists Union who have examined the major thoroughfares and develop a plan to partner with the Public Works Department to ensure the vision is carried out.

Julia Mejia

To help ensure our roads/crosswalks are safe and inclusive, I will be a strong advocate for continuing initiatives to convert and maintain raised curbs on intersections accessible to disabled folks. I will also work to increase the time allotted to pedestrian crossing on our intersections so that folks of all mobilities don’t have to worry about getting hit or holding up traffic. I will review the default speed limit of 25MPH and see if it can be lowered to 20MPH or lower in high fatality/pedestrian heavy corridors to further protect the people of Boston. Where street diets can be implemented, I will work with neighborhoods to help implement them. Because of the city’s history, the foundation for pedestrian first transit planning is there; we just need to ensure that we are being mindful about are implementation and oversight in achieving these goals.

We need to make it a system that gets all the people of Boston to where they need to go, not just one that likes to literally fly off the rails (and/or set itself on fire). I will work with and lobby the MBTA to expand the T into neighborhoods that don’t readily have access and fight for a free T for all to expand usage. I will activate local leaders and activists to provide oversight and advocate for their community. On the city level, I will work to further implement sustainable, people oriented transit infrastructure such as bus only lanes and median-protected bike lanes. I will be intentional about this rollout, targeting socioeconomically marginalized areas so that the benefits from expanding multi-modal transit will help build the foundation for an equitable and inclusive Boston. I will work with the PILOT working group to work to generate more revenue for the city to use to fund these efforts.

I will look to cities that have implemented this successful and work with organizations and community groups that are already working with the city to implement these plans. I will work with the Mayor to expand efforts to create street diets in neighborhoods across the city working specifically to ensure that our neighborhoods that are primarily communities of color are not left behind. Too often the city has prioritized street safety in predominately white neighborhoods. Ensuring a racial equity lens is applied to street safety and bike safety will be a central part of my approach.


Erin Murphy

Work with BPD and Mass State Police to enforce speed limits. Explore making some two-way streets into one-ways as is being implemented in South Boston.

A City Council seat on the MBTA Oversight Board to ensure Boston has meaningful input into the reformation of the T

I am working with Greater Ashmont to develop and build the Dot Greenway project which will transform the Red Line tunnel cap in Dorchester into bike and pedestrian paths. There are several similar initiatives around the City I look forward to supporting.

Jeff Ross

We can ensure that all of our neighborhoods have access to safe, active modes of transportation and I will champion increased investments in synthesized network hubs, including subways, walking and biking infrastructure. Mayor Walsh took an important step when implementing a 25MPH speed limit on our streets, but I would like to see stricter enforcement of this and all of our nuisance traffic impediments (jaywalking, ‘blocking the box’ or blocking a crosswalk, etc.).

This is a much broader challenge than what we may have an ability to impact simply on the City Council, but I believe that we have a responsibility to demand action of our delegation and other stakeholders at the state. It is incomprehensible that Governor Baker would allow this problem to grow during his time in office, and it is unsurprising that we face a crisis now. We need to demand better funding, better infrastructure investments, and the creation of a sustainable financial model to avoid these issues in the future.
The City should also have the gold standard bus rapid transit; specifically, dedicated right of way, busway alignment, off-board fare collection, intersection treatments, and platform-level boarding.

Again, I think the answer lays in my role as a potential City Councilor, which would empower me to hold oversight hearings and hold the Mayor’s administration accountable, with a particular influence on the budget. BTD can do more, and despite our growing traffic and commuter concerns, there is no reason to neglect the other modes of transportation while grappling with a crisis. In fact, this is a key part to solving the bigger issue: We need more commuters and travelers to utilize alternative modes of transportation to relieve the pressure on our vehicle roadways. Without this balance, our transportation crisis will grow.

Alejandra St.Guillen

In order to slow traffic on our streets, we need to make greater investments in Vision Zero. In comparison to other major cities, Boston invests a relatively small amount per person to implement the changes we need to make our streets safer. I would advocate for the bike lanes across the city, including expanding dedicated lanes across high demand transit corridors in the city that are wide enough for bikes. I also support the expansion of the Neighborhood Slow Streets program to make whole neighborhoods safer for children, seniors, walkers, and bikers. I also believe that there needs to be a public outreach campaign that targets multilingual communities in multiple languages and people with physical, auditory, or visual disabilities across various mediums educating the public about the importance of becoming a safer, more walkable and bikeable city. Also, there are certain mobility safety issues more prevalent in some neighborhoods and this ad campaign should micro target those specific areas. Lastly, I would also promote the open space, arts, and place-making by working with city agencies and local residents to support weekend street closures.

My top priorities for advancing public transit in Boston, especially in transit dependent communities like Mattapan, Roxbury, East Boston, and high demand transit corridors like Washington Street, Blue Hill Drive, or Centre St will be working with advocates and city/state agencies to upgrade core transportation assets across the city and reinvesting in neglected transportation links, some of these improvements include:
--Installing transit signal prioritization technology to enable the city to control traffic and optimize signals in real time to increase efficient flows of bikes and buses, while also decreasing the energy use of traffic signals.
--Installing and enforcing dedicated lanes on key bus high demand bus routes to improve reliability and travel time to where you live, work, and play.

In order to reach the goals of Vision Zero, we must commitment to installing and maintaining bike and pedestrian infrastructure (sidewalks, lanes, crosswalks, etc) to promote safety and mutli-modal mobility. Capital investment will be key to being able to fast-track implementation of a city-wide network of off-street paths and protected bike lanes. I support raising revenue to meet these investments. We need to partner with our State colleagues on areas that are covered by the State jurisdiction and advocate for more funding to implement these networks. The city should report progress on a quarterly basis with the ambitious goals set forth.

Michelle Wu

I have been a strong supporter of Vision Zero, which is a proven strategy for improving traffic safety and saving lives. Boston's Neighborhood Slow Streets program, the Vision Zero residential traffic calming program, should be expanded and implemented with greater urgency. We have seen an outpouring of support and concern from residents across the city who want to change their streets to decrease speeding and reckless driving, but the program has not kept up with need. All residents deserve to benefit from this program, and I will continue to fight for funding and staff resources to implement this vision. We also need to fast-track our priority corridor redesigns and finish the job on vital corridors such as Mass Ave. Several years ago, protected bike lanes and pedestrian improvements were installed along this roadway in Back Bay and part of the South End, leaving out the section that connects to Dorchester. I support the Boston Cyclists Union’s campaign along this corridor and would like to see similar improvements expanded, with project timelines centered around a one-year planning and implementation cycle.

The most impactful, fastest, and most cost effective way to dramatically improve public transit in Boston is for city government to focus on bus service. Dedicated bus lanes have been proven to speed up bus, shorten commute times, and increase ridership. This past term, I supported the implementation of the Washington Street bus lane in Roslindale and advocated for the creation of the City’s new Transit Team to oversee transit priority in Boston along with the MBTA. I continue to fight for these efforts to be accelerated as quickly as possible. We need to fund more BTD planning outreach positions to deepen engagement and expand our scale. I will continue connecting riders and colleagues to work collaboratively on tackling transit service inequities. We also need to lower the barriers that fares impose by moving toward fare-free transit, starting by removing barriers for our most underserved riders through a discounted fare for low-income residents. To finance these policies and to improve transit on our streets, I will push for measures to limit congestion on our streets, especially near environmental justice communities, as a matter of transit equity and public health.

Creating networks of protected bike lanes and off-street paths are critical for expanding cycling access to people of all ages and backgrounds. One of our current hurdles is the lengthy timeline needed to plan and implement street redesign. We can fast-track projects by implementing improvements with simple, temporary materials like paint, signs, and flexposts through on-going maintenance work. Every street repaving project should be an opportunity to implement a Better Bike corridor. The same goes for bus-only lanes and tactical medians, or curb bump-outs for pedestrian safety. By leveraging ongoing work, we can build our way toward a more connected, sustainable transportation network in a smart, cost-effective manner. Once these improvements are in place, we can collect feedback and data, allowing us to tweak the design before making improvements permanent. I will continue to advocate for greater collaboration between the Public Works Department and the Transportation Department. Finally, we need to apply a network-based approach to our bike planning. Newly constructed protected infrastructure shouldn't just direct cyclists toward an unsafe street without bike infrastructure.

Top

Additional Questions

Click on the categories below for the complete question asked. Click on any answer with a * for further explanation of the candidate's stance.

Do you support:

1. Vision Zero

1. Vision Zero is an approach which aims to eliminate traffic fatalities and serious injuries and has been adopted by Boston, Cambridge, and Somerville, and many other cities across the country. Do you support the principles of Vision Zero policies and funding for their rapid implementation?

click outside popup to close

2. State law allowing automated enforcement

2. One key strategy that has been proven to effectively reduce speeding, improve safety, and remove racial bias in traffic enforcement in other states and countries is automated enforcement (i.e. speed cameras and red light cameras). Do you support S.1376, An Act relative to automated enforcement, which if passed would authorize cities and towns in Massachusetts to opt into the use of automated enforcement? To see the full text of the bill, visit malegislature.gov/Bills/191/S1376

click outside popup to close

3. Bike Network Plan

3. Do you support the implementation of improved bike facilities identified in your community’s Bike Network Plan or do you support the creation of a Bike Network Plan if none already exists?

click outside popup to close

4. Age-friendly walking conditions

4. Do you support creating age-friendly walking conditions in your community -- an issue raised by many seniors as critical to their ability to 'age in community'? If yes, how?

click outside popup to close

(more below)

Michel Denis

Strongly Support*

Michel Denis

I support Vision Zero. Once elected, I look forward to having a continued discussion on how best to integrate autonomous vehicles, EV electric vehicles, bikes, and pedestrians into Boston's 2030 Plan to make our city carbon neutral.

click outside popup to close

Strongly Support*

Michel Denis

I am the only Boston City Council At Large Candidate that has proposed that we include driver's education into the BPS curriculum, as well as include bike safety training and CPR. Traffic cameras would capture the license plate numbers, at all major intersections in Boston, to ensure safety, similar to the MassDOT automated toll system already currently in place. I also support the ACLU and their efforts to ensure that racial bias no longer exists in the Boston Police, and so once elected I will support automated cameras on traffic lights, as well as body cameras, dash cameras, etc.

click outside popup to close

Strongly Support*

Michel Denis

I am the only Boston City Council At Large Candidate that has said in writing that once elected, I will host monthly meetings with the MBTA, BPD, BTA, and DND to ensure that community concerns are being reviewed, tracked, addressed, recorded, and responded to immediately, with a follow up on a monthly basis. Under my plan, there will be two new check points established to the Go Boston 2030 Plan in 2024, and 2029, so as to ensure everything is on schedule by 2030.

click outside popup to close

Strongly Support*

Michel Denis

I am the only Boston City Council At Large Candidate that has proposed walking sidewalks, similar to those in Logan Airport, in all Boston Municipal senior housing facilities by or before 2030. I would also explore the idea that then Boston District 5 City Councilor Rob Consalvo proposed in 2013 regarding adding rubber sidewalks around BHA Senior Housing Facilities. Last, but not least, once elected, I would create a partnership with my office, BPD, DND, and the Boston Elderly Commission to walk across the city to ensure that all major intersections have level, age friendly side walks.

click outside popup to close

 

Annissa Essaibi-George

Strongly Support

Strongly Oppose*

Annissa Essaibi-George

No. I think that the presence of Police Officers on our streets and in our communities makes our City safer. I also have concerns about how traffic cameras impact the privacy rights of Bostonians.

click outside popup to close

Strongly Support

Strongly Support

 

Michael Flaherty

Strongly Support

Strongly Support*

Michael Flaherty

I have long been an advocate for increased police presence on our roads and more traffic enforcement due to safety concerns I regularly hear from my constituents. Unfortunately, there is not enough manpower in each police district to sufficiently police all the roads on top of their other duties. As a result, I support these camera policies for the sake of driver, cyclist and pedestrian safety.

click outside popup to close

Strongly Support

Strongly Support*

Michael Flaherty

I have consistently led efforts to repair damaged sidewalks, especially in cases where tree roots have uprooted the sidewalk creating a dangerous hazard for seniors and the disabled. I also regularly process requests from constituents on faded crosswalks and signs that are in disrepair and have become a safety hazard. I also support addressing the issue of signal timing, which is insufficient for many residents.

click outside popup to close

 

David Halbert

Strongly Support

Strongly Support*

David Halbert

While I am in support of the general goals and utility of automated enforcement tools for traffic management purposes I need to see more concrete proposals for the use of such data by law enforcement in non-traffic related contexts. Additionally I have concerns about particular neighborhoods and communities being noticeably more observed and impacted via higher levels of deployment of such technologies in their areas.

click outside popup to close

Strongly Support

Strongly Support*

David Halbert

As previously stated I believe that it is critical to provide amenities in neighborhoods that allow access without necessitating use of a car. As such, when looking at decisions on zoning, licensing, and other areas of community design this must be taken into account as a significant criteria for review. We must also factor in access for seniors, particularly those facing mobility challenges, when looking at streetscape design elements and changes.

click outside popup to close

 

William King

Strongly Support

Strongly Oppose*

William King

I oppose the Act because I don't think we should move in the direction of becoming a police state. Essentially all this does is cause fear and breaks down the trust between government and the people it serves. I support city surveillance cameras on intersections to monitor shootings or hit and runs, but I don't support automated traffic enforcement.

click outside popup to close

Strongly Support

Strongly Support*

William King

In areas of the city with high concentration of seniors, crosswalk lights should have additional time added to allow seniors to cross the streets and there should be sidewalk ramps for residents who use a wheelchair. Boston's aging population deserves to be heard on the issues that most impact their life and will help them to remain in the neighborhoods and communities they've built.

click outside popup to close

 

Julia Mejia

Strongly Support

Strongly Support

Strongly Support

Strongly Support*

Julia Mejia

I plan to work with the Department of Transportation specifically to prioritize lengthening the time allocated for crosswalks and where possible implementing street diets that create medians where pedestrians can safely wait to cross our bigger streets.

click outside popup to close

 

Erin Murphy

Somewhat Support

Strongly Support

Somewhat Support

Strongly Support*


Erin Murphy

Better enforcement of snow clearance on sidewalks, better maintenance of walkways and sidewalks in neighborhoods, more benches and places for seniors to rest during neighborhood walks.

click outside popup to close

 

Jeff Ross

Strongly Support

Strongly Oppose

Strongly Support

Strongly Support

 

Alejandra St.Guillen

Strongly Support

Strongly Support

Strongly Support

Strongly Support*

Alejandra St.Guillen

Sidewalk improvements, increased signage at all crosswalks, curb cut maintenance and improvement

click outside popup to close

 

Michelle Wu

Strongly Support

Strongly Support

Strongly Support

Strongly Support*

Michelle Wu

I see Vision Zero as an effort to improve the everyday lives of our seniors, who may be especially vulnerable to road conditions that encourage speeding cars. I support the efforts of WalkBoston and neighborhood affiliates to conduct walk audits with community members, and the City should work closely to implement these necessary changes.

click outside popup to close

 

Do you support:

5. Restriction of parking for bus-only lanes

5. Do you support the restriction of on-street parking during rush hour in order to create dedicated bus lanes on certain major thoroughfares where bus riders experience significant delays due to traffic congestion?

click outside popup to close

6. New revenue sources

6. Do you support exploring new ways of raising revenue to provide Boston with more tools to improve conditions for people walking, using mobility assistive devices, biking, and using public transit (e.g. increasing the gas tax, implementing congestion pricing, increasing fees on Uber/Lyft)? If yes, please give examples that interest you.

click outside popup to close

7. Dynamic parking meter pricing

7. Do you support the rollout of dynamic parking meter pricing in business districts, which would increase meter rates during periods of increased demand, to free up on-street parking and reduce cars "cruising" for open spaces?

click outside popup to close

8. Traffic signal timing that prioritizes people walking

8. Boston has many traffic signals that do not work well for pedestrians. Do you support making signal timing safer, easier, and more convenient for people walking and using mobility assistive devices at all paces?

click outside popup to close

(more below)

Michel Denis

Somewhat Support*

Michel Denis

I am the only Boston City Councilor At Large Candidate that has pledged to support the people first, so that includes standing up for Boston residents who have valid stickers and permits to park their car in from of their own house. Under my new plan, major thoroughfares would get monorails, similar to Disney's Epcot Center, modeled after the old above ground orange line. Boston is the world's first public transit system, so I am also the only Boston City Council Candidate who has proposed using the South Boston underground Silverline model, for Brighton Ave, Comm Ave, and Blue Hill Avenue.

click outside popup to close

Strongly Support*

Michel Denis

Yes, I support implementing congestion pricing in partnership with MassDOT, DND, Fastlane, and BTD to charge non-Boston City Residents a fee to use our municipal streets, just like the state charges a toll to use Massachusetts Roads. I do not support increasing the gas tax, unless there is an EV electric vehicle charging station infrastructure, which I plan to propose as an amendment to the Boston 2030 Plan once I am elected. I would however support increasing fees on both Uber and Lyft, with the carbon neutral exception for Green Transportation, Hybrid, or Electric Uber and Lyft vehicles.

click outside popup to close

Strongly Support*

Michel Denis

Yes, I support dynamic parking pricing to ALL non-Boston residents, similar to the Fenway Park model that increases the cost of parking during Red Sox games. Once elected, any non-Boston resident would have an increased fee during periods of increased demand, so as to free up the city wide on-street parking for ALL City of Boston residents.

click outside popup to close

Strongly Support*

Michel Denis

I am the only Boston City Council At Large Candidate that has said in writing that I would make it a priority to ensure that all municipal traffic lights and walking signals are pedestrian friendly, and also include audio verifications, as well as sidewalk additions for the blind.

click outside popup to close

 

Annissa Essaibi-George

Strongly Support

Strongly Support*

Annissa Essaibi-George

Boston and Massachusetts as a whole are in a transportation crisis. Despite recent efforts to increase access to transit through non-motor vehicle means, there are still staggering deficits that need to be addressed immediately. I have always supported raising the gas tax with revenue going directly to transit-related investments. I support charging a fee for more than one parking permit per household with revenue being earmarked for similar projects, and I strongly support increasing fees on TNCs.

click outside popup to close

Strongly Support*

Annissa Essaibi-George

I support dynamic parking meter pricing in our downtown business districts where this problem is most prevalent (Financial District, Seaport, LMA, Fenway, Back Bay, Beacon Hill). In most outer neighborhood business districts, I would want to ensure that such a policy would pricing would not hurt small businesses if a problem does not exist.

click outside popup to close

Strongly Support

 

Michael Flaherty

Strongly Support*

Michael Flaherty

I support this policy in areas where residents and businesses would not be adversely impacted. I would like to see a detailed transportation study on which roads this policy makes sense for around the city.

click outside popup to close

Strongly Support*

Michael Flaherty

I support increased fees on TNCs, along with making sure we are appropriately taxing shared mobility devices like electric scooters as we build out the regulations on those devices. We need to make sure users of both these transit methods are paying their fare share for their use of the roads.

click outside popup to close

Strongly Support*

Michael Flaherty

Parking downtown is already a financial burden on city residents, with garage fees that working people, who may not be able to use the T for varying reasons, cannot afford. I am concerned that increasing meter fees during high demand times will increase the handicap placard abuse that is already happening throughout our City, as put forth by a 2016 Inspector General Report. A recommendation of this report was to create a two-tier system that would grant the handicapped meter-fee exemption to placard holders who are physically unable to reach a parking kiosk or insert coins into a meter.

click outside popup to close

Strongly Support

 

David Halbert

Somewhat Support*

David Halbert

I believe that dedicated rush hour bus lanes, such as what has been implemented along Washington Street in Roslindale, can have a significant positive impact for those using mass transit and in encouraging others to switch to mass transit from personal vehicles. My concern is that, as this model seeks to be expanded, the city takes care to engage and provide parking options for those who otherwise would have their vehicles in those lanes - so that they may have the least disruption to their quality of life as possible.

click outside popup to close

Strongly Support*

David Halbert

"Collecting accurate and up-to-date property valuations on institutions subject to PILOT agreements, so that the direct financial contribution portion of the request is as robust and fair as possible. Congestion pricing, with a focus on how to hold harmless those at the lower end of the socio-economic spectrum who need to have access the the commercial core of the city for their livelihood and full civic participation. This would also necessitate more robust delivery of city services at the neighborhood level in order to protect against losses of equity and access. Increasing TNC fees."

click outside popup to close

Somewhat Support

Strongly Support

 

William King

Strongly Support

Strongly Support*

William King

I would support increasing gas tax, implementing a carbon tax, and working on way to get the most out of PILOT.

click outside popup to close

Strongly Support

Strongly Support

 

Julia Mejia

Strongly Support

Strongly Support*

Julia Mejia

I will work with the PILOT working group, I support congestion pricing as well as dynamic metered pricing.

click outside popup to close

Strongly Support

Strongly Support

 

Erin Murphy

Somewhat Support*


Erin Murphy

Until the MBTA provides consistently reliable to public transport to Boston residents, I hesitate to implement binding restrictions on commuters are at their wits ends trying to get to work and school on time.

click outside popup to close

Somewhat Oppose*


Erin Murphy

Again, I believe public resources and elected officials should be focused on providing quality public transportation to citizens before we use measures like fines, ticketing, and tax increases (which are often perceived as punitive to regular citizens) to ease traffic and congestion and to decrease emissions.

click outside popup to close

Strongly Support

Strongly Support

 

Jeff Ross

Strongly Support

Strongly Support

Strongly Support

Strongly Support

 

Alejandra St.Guillen

Strongly Support

Strongly Support*

Alejandra St.Guillen

Congestion pricing; increasing fees on Uber/Lyft; charging for residential stickers

click outside popup to close

Strongly Support

Strongly Support

 

Michelle Wu

Strongly Support

Strongly Support*

Michelle Wu

We need multiple options to raise sustainable revenues at the scale needed for a transportation that serves all residents. Our policies should create the right incentives to use sustainable transportation by offering people high-quality infrastructure and charging users according to their impacts, including raising the gas tax and congestion pricing. I also support increasing fees for ride-hailing companies, including more funding to cities and towns overwhelmed by ride-sharing. Finally, cities and towns should be able to raise revenue directly through Regional Ballot Initiatives.

click outside popup to close

Strongly Support*

Michelle Wu

I support better managing parking spaces by setting the right price. I also support Parking Benefits District, which would allow for investing the revenue from parking meters into communities locally, such as to our Main Streets districts for much-needed neighborhood improvements and projects.

click outside popup to close

Strongly Support

 

Do you support:

9. Charging for residential parking permits

9. Do you support charging an annual fee for residential parking permits?

click outside popup to close

10. Reducing/ eliminating MBTA fares

10. Do you support reducing or eliminating MBTA fares for people with low income?

click outside popup to close

11. Ensuring large-scale developments are walkable, resilient, green, and connected

11. Do you support ensuring large-scale developments (including Sullivan Square, the Allston I-90 Interchange, and Suffolk Downs) incorporate the community's desire for walkability, connectivity, open space, and resiliency?

click outside popup to close

   

Michel Denis

Somewhat Support*

Michel Denis

I am the only Boston City Councilor At Large Candidate who has said in writing that we should not penalize low income City of Boston residents. However, once elected, I would support Boston City Councilor Michelle Wu's proposal to charge an annual fee for residential parking permits. However, I am the only Boston City Council At Large Candidate who has proposed one residential parking sticker for the entire city, so that families and friends can visit each other.

click outside popup to close

Strongly Support*

Michel Denis

I am the only Boston City Council At Large Candidate who has proposed a free MBTA monthly pass for all City of Boston Employees, all BPS students, all BPS graduates participating in the RoxMapp Program, all City of Boston Seniors, and all qualifying low income, elderly US Citizens, US Veterans, and all low income Boston City Residents with a disability.

click outside popup to close

Strongly Support*

Michel Denis

Yes, I am the only Boston City Council At Large Candidate who has said in writing, that people should be able to walk, and or be able to take Green Transportation to work everyday.

click outside popup to close

   

Annissa Essaibi-George

Somewhat Support*

Annissa Essaibi-George

I strongly support charging a fee for more than one parking permit per household (excluding seniors, and residents living on fixed incomes and in poverty.

click outside popup to close

Strongly Support

Strongly Support

   

Michael Flaherty

Strongly Oppose*

Michael Flaherty

At this time, I do not support charging for residential parking permits. I would like to see a complete audit done of existing spaces and their usage across the city before any policy is created and enacted. In many neighborhoods there is not enough parking and residents would be paying for a service that is therefore not available to them, making the policy inequitable. Further, the T is already too unreliable for Boston residents daily needs that it would be irresponsible to make the ownership of a car that residents need to go about their daily lives any more tedious or costly.

click outside popup to close

Strongly Support*

Michael Flaherty

I support my colleague Councilor Michelle Wu’s call that the T should be entirely free for all users, regardless of economic status, based on the outsized share of MBTA operating funds that Boston contributes and the overall environmental benefits of increased public transportation usage,. Not only will this will take more cars off the road and further reduce traffic congestion to alleviate bus delays, it has the added benefit of reducing our city’s carbon footprint to help preserve the environment for our children.

click outside popup to close

Strongly Support

   

David Halbert

Somewhat Support*

David Halbert

I support the overall goal of this proposal, reducing the amount of automobiles on Boston's streets. Initially the 1st vehicle registered to a discrete address should not be charged a fee. After that a permit fee for other vehicles is reasonable. For those who work outside of Boston, in areas where public transit is severely limited or functionally not an option, an automobile is often an unfortunate economic necessity. As a matter of fairness and equity, and where the proposed fee on 1st vehicles is so low, this would allow more residents to grow to accept and embrace the idea of fees for all

click outside popup to close

Somewhat Support*

David Halbert

Reducing or eliminating MBTA fares for low-income riders is a significant step towards greater access and utilization of public transit. It could also significantly help with traffic and parking related issues in Boston. While I am in full support of these goals I also want to ensure that there are identified, and ideally dedicated, funding streams to offset the loss of revenue by the T. This becomes even more critical in this type of proposal as ridership would be expected to increase and further tax the operational capacity of the system.

click outside popup to close

Strongly Support

   

William King

Strongly Oppose

Strongly Support

Strongly Support

   

Julia Mejia

Strongly Support

Strongly Support

Strongly Support

   

Erin Murphy

Somewhat Oppose*


Erin Murphy

It depends. Residents who live in the most dense neighborhoods often oppose resident parking schemes because it makes caring for the elderly and receiving family visitors more difficult. Any increase in residential parking fees and/or expansion of the program needs to be done in concert with neighborhood preferences and priorities.

click outside popup to close

Strongly Oppose*


Erin Murphy

Public transportation should be affordable for everyone. Seniors and BPS students should receive discounts, but otherwise, all riders of the MBTA should shoulder an equitable burden in terms of fares.

click outside popup to close

Strongly Support

   

Jeff Ross

Strongly Support

Strongly Support

Strongly Support

   

Alejandra St.Guillen

Strongly Support

Strongly Support

Strongly Support

   

Michelle Wu

Strongly Support*

Michelle Wu

During this term on the Council, I held a hearing on better managing residential parking permits and introduced an ordinance proposing an annual residential parking permit fee of $25 for the first vehicle in a household, $50 for the second, etc., with exemptions for low-income residents, seniors, and public school and health care staff who need to travel to visit students or patients. Managing this parking would also allow us more flexibility to address residents' needs--my ordinance also proposed to create a visitor parking pass program.

click outside popup to close

Strongly Support*

Michelle Wu

I believe we need to Free the T for all, and that starts by lowering the barriers to those who depend on this service most. The MBTA’s fare hikes are regressive and impact low-income riders most. I have testified multiple times before the MBTA’s governing board in support of a low-income fare and will continue to do so. Based on the conclusions of a recent MIT study, which found that participants with a reduced fare made more trips by transit to medical services, such a program could be administered statewide through MassHealth.

click outside popup to close

Strongly Support*

Michelle Wu

With some of these larger projects, we need to ensure we are making the necessary investments in public transit to influence how people travel to these areas. In Allston, we need to make sure that West Station is built now, as an interim mitigation measure during the I-90 reconstruction process.

click outside popup to close

   

Top

About the Candidate

1. How do you move around your community and get to where you need to go?
Michel Denis
I walk. I run. I bike. I drive.
Annissa Essaibi-George
"I use different modes of transportation to get around my community, to work, and community events. When I am transporting my four boys to sports and school events, and when I commute in to City Hall, I usually drive. When I travel from City Hall to community events during the work day, I often walk or take public transportation."
Michael Flaherty
As an At-large City Councilor, a normal day includes meetings in all corners of the city, most of the time on a tight timeline. As such, I generally drive or carpool with staff to each of these meetings. I try to take the T when it is practical for my schedule, but this is a constant reminder that we need to improve the quality of public transportation in Boston so that the use of a car is not a necessity for reliable cross-city travel.
David Halbert
I use a combination of methods depending on where I am going and when. Currently I primarily travel via my personal vehicle due to logistical demands as a city wide candidate. I prefer to utilize public transportation or walk whenever possible.
William King
I drive an electric vehicle or I walk depending on the distance traveling.
Julia Mejia
I rely on my car because my lack of access to public transit essentially forces me to contribute to our city’s worst in the nation traffic and the accompanying environmental/public health risks.
Erin Murphy
Walking and by car
Jeff Ross
Walk, MBTA, Bus, Automobile
Alejandra St.Guillen
"I generally combine the use of my car with public transportation. I take my son to daycare in Roslindale and thus drive from West Roxbury to Roslindale and then take public transportation if I’m going downtown. Generally, if I’m not going downtown, I will often drive from location to location to limit my travel time. I live very close to a Main Street district and thus am able to walk to places for leisure activities or light shopping."
Michelle Wu
"I commute to City Hall from Roslindale (most days with at least one of my kids) by taking the Orange Line from Forest Hills to State Street. A few times per month, we may change to catch the Commuter Rail from Back Bay Station to Roslindale Village on the way home. Since the implementation of the inbound morning rush hour dedicated bus lane on Washington Street, it’s been much easier and more reliable to take any of the buses (34, 34E, 36, etc.) from Roslindale Square to Forest Hills. Outside of this route, I also walk or use public transit or bike share to get to meetings across the city."
2. What is a particularly dangerous problem or location in your community for people walking, biking, taking transit, or for people with disabilities that you’d like to see addressed?
Michel Denis
The corner of Morton street and Blue Hill Avenue. I would like to see Comm Ave and Brighton Avenue get a dedicated bus and bike lane. I would also like to address the lack of bus and bike lanes in both Mattapan and Hyde Park. I support the bike lane improvements scheduled for Hyde Park, and last but not least, I would like to see bike lanes added throughout Dorchester Avenue, and Massachusetts Avenue.
Annissa Essaibi-George
Our transportation infrastructure is entirely car-centric, relegating pedestrians, bikes, and other mode of transportation to the “extra space” after car lanes and parking space have been allocated. Further, distracted drivers pose a tremendous risk to non-car users of all kinds. Though the city has used pylons and markers, one of the most dangerous places to be in the city is in a bike lane or crosswalk. We need to take every action possible to refocus drivers and improve safety for non-car users.
Michael Flaherty
"As a Boston City Councilor At-Large, I have seen and/or heard from residents about the following locations: 1) The intersection between the Reggie Lewis Track and Athletic Center and Roxbury Crossing - extending onto Malcolm X Blvd. 2) L Street in South Boston. 3) Tremont St and Washington St, particularly during rush hours. 4) Along Centre Street, especially past the Arborway, JP leading into West Roxbury. 5) Crossing Commonwealth Ave and Beacon Street. 6) Speeding all across the city."
David Halbert
The section of Morton Street (state route 203) from just west of the intersection of Morton and Harvard, until Cemetary Road in Jamaica Plain is very dangerous. This is a high speed, heavily trafficked thoroughfare that has no protected bike lanes and no sidewalks for pedestrians or those with mobility challenges. In addition to being dangerous, this lack of infrastructure further separates Dorchester/Mattapan from the Forest Hills neighborhood.
William King
I have lived on American Legion Hwy my entire life. Amer. Legion has a dangerous crosswalk at the corner of Blue Hill Ave where I have seen multiple people hit and injured. Even if pedestrians have a walk sign cars from Blue Hill fly around the corner taking a right onto the highway. Amer. Legion also has a speed problem. There have been many car crashes that claim lives. Amer. Legion needs raised crosswalks and the digital speedometers so people see their speed and self correct. With 3 schools located here, we need to make this a priority to keep kids safe.
Julia Mejia
Our public transit system is in complete crisis - it is unreliable and becoming consistently unsafe to ride. The lack of protected bike lanes throughout the city prevents more people from transitioning to biking. Street diets are needed in multiple high traffic neighborhoods to address both congestion and pedestrian safety.
Erin Murphy
Speed enforcement, better sidewalk snow clearance, fix the T
Jeff Ross
There are specific safety issues – dangerous intersections for pedestrians, far too many bicycle fatalities, unacceptable sidewalk conditions for those with disabilities – but if I had to point to one singular danger with the broadest impact, I would have to say the commute. Congestion and traffic seems to present the biggest danger to all road travelers – bike, car, truck, pedestrians. As our traffic issues increase, we’re seeing increased frustration and impatience, and I believe an accompanying economic impact will emerge.
Alejandra St.Guillen
"In my immediate community of West Roxbury, Centre street between Lagrange to South has been a particularly dangerous area for pedestrians. There are two lanes going in each direction and there have been a number of accidents (including fatalities). It’s also not a bike-friendly stretch. As I knock doors across the city, I have found many areas lack proper infrastructure for people with disabilities - sidewalks ending suddenly, sidewalks that nearly impassable with a stroller (as I often have my son with me) and I’m sure extremely dangerous for older people and people with disabilities."
Michelle Wu
Too many streets across Boston are too dangerous for people who rely on them everyday. My shared campaign office is near Dudley Square, and nearly all the streets leading in and out of the area are among those with the worst crash rates, with conditions encouraging speeding and making it difficult to cross in a single cycle. Sadly these conditions are common throughout the city, and the top issue that I hear about when knocking on doors is how dangerous it feels to walk on even our residential streets due to speeding cars trying to avoid horrible traffic on main roads and unsafe street design.
3. Why do you think people who care about walking, biking, transit, and mobility issues should vote for you?
Michel Denis
I am the only Boston City Council At Large Candidate who believes in writing that walking, biking, and EV electric vehicles are the key to making sure Boston reaches our city wide carbon neutral goals by 2030, by actively encouraging more Green Transportation through proven government models already in place in countries like Spain and China. It is time that Boston becomes a leader in Green Transportation in America, and once elected, I will make it a priority to integrate Boston Public School curriculum, Boston 311, and BTD, in a new pilot program in partnership with DCR and the MBTA.
Annissa Essaibi-George
I have been a strong proponent for investing in infrastructure and programming to make Boston safer and easier to travel. I have supported the creation of Bus Rapid Transit (BRT), more funding for protected bike lanes, and other important traffic calming measures. I advocated for and the budget was increased this year to include a Crash Analyst to work with the BPD & BTD to analyze accidents and make recommendations to improve safety after an incident. I have joined Councilor Wu in fighting MBTA fare increases. I have fully embraced Vision Zero and will continue my advocacy when re-elected.
Michael Flaherty
I have seen firsthand the daily frustrations of Boston residents and commuters as the region is plagued by traffic and our public transportation system continues to provide unacceptable levels of service. I am willing to support any method with the proper research behind it that can alleviate any of these transit issues. These include protected bike lanes, lower speed limits, illuminated and raised crosswalks, speed bumps, and road diets. We also need to work with the state to improve the MBTA across the board.
David Halbert
I realize that as we make policy recommendations on transportation issues we must prioritize equity as well. Striking this balance means thinking creatively about transportation. For example, I have been a strong advocate for creating more walkable neighborhoods across Boston, with everyday amenities nearby - thus reducing the need for residents to drive as often. I will bring this approach to all transportation discussions on the Council, along with the humility to seek input and assistance from stakeholders as I am not a transit policy expert.
William King
I am someone who will advocate for the safety of our residents who walk and bike and those who commute via MBTA. We can't be a city that pushes for our residents to be environmentally friendly then make it unsafe or a hassle to use other modes of transportation.
Julia Mejia
"I experience the inequities of mobility in our city and am ready to address these issues. I live in a low income community that doesn’t have easy access to public transit, requiring many folks to get a car just to get to work, leading to more traffic, pollution and accidents on our roads. This enables me to address transit issues from the perspective of income inequality that is necessary to equitably solve these problems and make Boston a city where all of its residents can easily and sustainably move from point A to point B."
Erin Murphy
I will work for a new Red Line station in Dorchester and reforming the MBTA
Jeff Ross
Creative dialogue about transportation options became a tangential benefit of the discussion of Boston hosting the Olympics, and despite the failure of the overall effort, these alternative ideas deserve some level of consideration – such as a gondola from South Boston to South Station, an extension of the Emerald Necklace, or a Boston-Quincy ferry service. I hear the transportation concerns in every single neighborhood in the City. I recognize this as a huge threat to our economic growth and our ability to thrive as a city, and this will be among my highest priorities as your City Councilor.
Alejandra St.Guillen
"I would be a strong advocate for increased mobility options and safety across the city. My top priorities for advancing sustainability, especially in transit dependent communities will be working with advocates and city/state agencies to upgrade core transportation assets across the city and reinvesting in neglected transportation links, including protected and connected bike lanes. Failure to find ways to expand access to high-quality transit, as well as alternative mobility options like walking and biking, will mean more pollution, congestion, stunted economic growth, and frustration."
Michelle Wu
Throughout my tenure on the City Council, I have fought for a more sustainable transportation future. From fighting for investments in cycling infrastructure and improvements in bus service, to helping expand access to youth T passes, to organizing a system-wide canvass of the MBTA alongside a coalition of commuters, advocacy organizations, and elected officials, I have worked to highlight the experiences of communities and people in pushing for transportation solutions focused on equity, scale, and urgency. Transit access and equity is fundamental, and we can't let it be only a state issue.

Policy Proposals

1. How will you ensure implementation of the infrastructure changes needed to slow traffic on your community’s streets, and improve crosswalks and intersections to make them safer for people who are walking and using mobility assistive devices?
Michel Denis
Once I am elected, I will require that all street and road work projects include upgrades to street cut outs, handicap ramps, speed ramps, bike lanes, and crosswalks. I will also introduce a new city ordinance requiring a reasonable 24 hour timeline for repainting Boston City Cross Walks and Bike Lanes immediately after any city street contract work has been completed, in order to guarantee the safety of all pedestrians and bicyclists.
Annissa Essaibi-George
"Constituents are most knowledgeable about their block, street, neighborhood and are bet positioned to help us identify where infrastructure can be improved to increase safety. I frequently hear from constituents about trouble spots and we work with BTD and others to improve the infrastructure to address these concerns. The Boston Bike Union and other advocate groups know the trouble spots for bikes and we need to fast-track improvements. I have advocated for raised crosswalks in front of our schools, especially for elementary schools, at playgrounds, senior housing, and senior centers."
Michael Flaherty
"A defining feature of the Vision Zero strategy in the City of Boston is the Neighborhood Slow Streets Program. Since its launch in 2017, the Neighborhood Slow Streets program is gradually extending into high traffic areas of the city. I have supported, and will continue to support, every neighborhood’s efforts to implement safety-oriented measures that enable and empower healthier communities. We also need to look at more long-term sustainable budget solutions so that Slow Streets programming opportunities are available on a more equal and equitable level in every neighborhood. Further, I am supportive of building a more robust data framework for Vision Zero updates so that residents can better track the progress of current projects. The creation of a comprehensive map of completed and ongoing projects with clear benchmarks to track progress through the “zero” goal year of 2030 would bring greater accountability and transparency to the process."
David Halbert
"As a member of the Council I will seek to see the body's Post Audit and Oversight Committee reconstituted and as to serve as Chair. I believe that the mandate of this committee, to review government operations and expenditures, is germane to the goal of seeking safer streets as it allows for precise and specific inquiry into what efforts the City has taken to achieve this goal and what the overall efficacy of those efforts has been. The information gathered by this type of inquiry can serve as a concrete building block for future proposals and performance review. In addition I would make the goal of traffic-calmed streets a key component of any and all discussions with the city's transportation department. This would include conversations during the annual budgeting process - and would also be informed by the data from the Post Audit hearings in the 2nd year of the term and moving forward."
William King
As councilor, I will work with the Public Works Dept. at the City to institute raised crosswalks, street posted digital speedometers, and sidewalk changes to cut down on distances pedestrians must walk.
Julia Mejia
"To help ensure our roads/crosswalks are safe and inclusive, I will be a strong advocate for continuing initiatives to convert and maintain raised curbs on intersections accessible to disabled folks. I will also work to increase the time allotted to pedestrian crossing on our intersections so that folks of all mobilities don’t have to worry about getting hit or holding up traffic. I will review the default speed limit of 25MPH and see if it can be lowered to 20MPH or lower in high fatality/pedestrian heavy corridors to further protect the people of Boston. Where street diets can be implemented, I will work with neighborhoods to help implement them. Because of the city’s history, the foundation for pedestrian first transit planning is there; we just need to ensure that we are being mindful about are implementation and oversight in achieving these goals."
Erin Murphy
Work with BPD and Mass State Police to enforce speed limits. Explore making some two-way streets into one-ways as is being implemented in South Boston.
Jeff Ross
"We can ensure that all of our neighborhoods have access to safe, active modes of transportation and I will champion increased investments in synthesized network hubs, including subways, walking and biking infrastructure. Mayor Walsh took an important step when implementing a 25MPH speed limit on our streets, but I would like to see stricter enforcement of this and all of our nuisance traffic impediments (jaywalking, ‘blocking the box’ or blocking a crosswalk, etc.)."
Alejandra St.Guillen
In order to slow traffic on our streets, we need to make greater investments in Vision Zero. In comparison to other major cities, Boston invests a relatively small amount per person to implement the changes we need to make our streets safer. I would advocate for the bike lanes across the city, including expanding dedicated lanes across high demand transit corridors in the city that are wide enough for bikes. I also support the expansion of the Neighborhood Slow Streets program to make whole neighborhoods safer for children, seniors, walkers, and bikers. I also believe that there needs to be a public outreach campaign that targets multilingual communities in multiple languages and people with physical, auditory, or visual disabilities across various mediums educating the public about the importance of becoming a safer, more walkable and bikeable city. Also, there are certain mobility safety issues more prevalent in some neighborhoods and this ad campaign should micro target those specific areas. Lastly, I would also promote the open space, arts, and place-making by working with city agencies and local residents to support weekend street closures.
Michelle Wu
I have been a strong supporter of Vision Zero, which is a proven strategy for improving traffic safety and saving lives. Boston's Neighborhood Slow Streets program, the Vision Zero residential traffic calming program, should be expanded and implemented with greater urgency. We have seen an outpouring of support and concern from residents across the city who want to change their streets to decrease speeding and reckless driving, but the program has not kept up with need. All residents deserve to benefit from this program, and I will continue to fight for funding and staff resources to implement this vision. We also need to fast-track our priority corridor redesigns and finish the job on vital corridors such as Mass Ave. Several years ago, protected bike lanes and pedestrian improvements were installed along this roadway in Back Bay and part of the South End, leaving out the section that connects to Dorchester. I support the Boston Cyclists Union’s campaign along this corridor and would like to see similar improvements expanded, with project timelines centered around a one-year planning and implementation cycle.
2. How will you improve the reach, frequency, and quality of public transit in Boston?
Michel Denis
I am the only Boston City Council At Lange Candidate that has said in writing that I support extending the Blue Line to Lynn, Massachusetts, and extending the Greenline to Somerville, Massachusetts. I am also the only Boston City Council At Large Candidate that has said we need to revisit the MBTA Silverline Study regarding Blue Hill Avenue, from Dudley Square to Mattapan Square, as well as looking for a replacement to replace the old A Train that used to connect Allston/Brighton to Downtown Boston. Currently, the MBTA does not offer wi-fi to the Blue, Red, Green, and Orange Line, only on the Purple Line. Once elected, I am the only Boston City Council At Large Candidate who has said in writing that I would work with the state legislature to require that the MBTA make free wi-fi available to all City of Boston Residents on all Buses and Trains by 2021.
Annissa Essaibi-George
"We need to place a greater emphasis on funding projects and initiatives that makes public transportation more accessible in Boston. Our broken public transportation network not only creates commuting to work, school, and moving around ones community much more difficult, but it costs our economy billions of dollars annually, and pushes occasional users of public transit to use their cars – further exacerbating the problem of traffic congestion. Boston is a world-class city, and we must have a transportation network that matches our reputation. While there are limited measures the City can take to fix the broken MBTA, I still have used my role as a City Councilor as a bully pulpit to advocate for significant capital investments in train infrastructure. I have and will continued to advocate for BRT through our commercial corridors, increased City investments in making our streets, sidewalks, and bike paths safer, better connected, and more accessible. We also need to evaluate the frequency of resetting our traffic signal system across the City. This will help the flow of traffic, properly slow traffic and increase the transit network in particular for buses and the Green Line."
Michael Flaherty
"The MBTA is one of the lifelines of our city; when it doesn’t work, our city doesn’t function properly. The recent derailments and technical difficulties served as a painful reminder of that. Our residents’ ability to go about their daily lives relies on a reliable public transit network. These minimum standards have not been met by the MBTA, and this fare hike creates an additional access barrier for commuters. Boston contributes $85.8 million to the local assessment revenues of the MBTA — more than half of the total local assessment revenues collected annually, and yet our residents are not being sufficiently served. Despite the city’s hefty financial investment in the MBTA, we have no vote on the MBTA budget and no representation on the Fiscal and Management Control Board. Restoring Boston’s role in the decision-making processes of the MBTA is an essential step to fixing the issues that have plagued the system for decades. It is incumbent upon the MBTA to give Boston’s residents a voice in the ongoing conversation about how to fix our ailing public transportation system. Boston's residents and taxpayers deserve it. I have co-sponsored a hearing order to address these concerns."
David Halbert
I will work with my fellow Councilors and the Mayor to promote all city-based efforts to increase public transit access and use. This would include streetscape and roadway redesign where appropriate; creating the necessary infrastructure to support bus rapid transit; and seeking to have Boston's voice reflected directly in MBTA leadership conversations, either via a city specific seat on the Board or through robust participation in a Community Advisory Committee similar to what exists with MassPort. I would also seek to work in as close a collaborative fashion as possible with Boston's state legislative delegation, since so many conversations around public transit - particularly funding - are decided at the state level. In order for Boston to achieve its full public transit potential it is critical that City Hall and the State House work together.
William King
The MBTA is a state function which needs the support of Boston residents to ensure effective operation. As councillor, I will work with the city delegation at the state house to demand adequate representation for Boston transit equity.
Julia Mejia
We need to make it a system that gets all the people of Boston to where they need to go, not just one that likes to literally fly off the rails (and/or set itself on fire). I will work with and lobby the MBTA to expand the T into neighborhoods that don’t readily have access and fight for a free T for all to expand usage. I will activate local leaders and activists to provide oversight and advocate for their community. On the city level, I will work to further implement sustainable, people oriented transit infrastructure such as bus only lanes and median-protected bike lanes. I will be intentional about this rollout, targeting socioeconomically marginalized areas so that the benefits from expanding multi-modal transit will help build the foundation for an equitable and inclusive Boston. I will work with the PILOT working group to work to generate more revenue for the city to use to fund these efforts.
Erin Murphy
A City Council seat on the MBTA Oversight Board to ensure Boston has meaningful input into the reformation of the T
Jeff Ross
"This is a much broader challenge than what we may have an ability to impact simply on the City Council, but I believe that we have a responsibility to demand action of our delegation and other stakeholders at the state. It is incomprehensible that Governor Baker would allow this problem to grow during his time in office, and it is unsurprising that we face a crisis now. We need to demand better funding, better infrastructure investments, and the creation of a sustainable financial model to avoid these issues in the future. The City should also have the gold standard bus rapid transit; specifically, dedicated right of way, busway alignment, off-board fare collection, intersection treatments, and platform-level boarding."
Alejandra St.Guillen
"My top priorities for advancing public transit in Boston, especially in transit dependent communities like Mattapan, Roxbury, East Boston, and high demand transit corridors like Washington Street, Blue Hill Drive, or Centre St will be working with advocates and city/state agencies to upgrade core transportation assets across the city and reinvesting in neglected transportation links, some of these improvements include: --Installing transit signal prioritization technology to enable the city to control traffic and optimize signals in real time to increase efficient flows of bikes and buses, while also decreasing the energy use of traffic signals. --Installing and enforcing dedicated lanes on key bus high demand bus routes to improve reliability and travel time to where you live, work, and play."
Michelle Wu
The most impactful, fastest, and most cost effective way to dramatically improve public transit in Boston is for city government to focus on bus service. Dedicated bus lanes have been proven to speed up bus, shorten commute times, and increase ridership. This past term, I supported the implementation of the Washington Street bus lane in Roslindale and advocated for the creation of the City’s new Transit Team to oversee transit priority in Boston along with the MBTA. I continue to fight for these efforts to be accelerated as quickly as possible. We need to fund more BTD planning outreach positions to deepen engagement and expand our scale. I will continue connecting riders and colleagues to work collaboratively on tackling transit service inequities. We also need to lower the barriers that fares impose by moving toward fare-free transit, starting by removing barriers for our most underserved riders through a discounted fare for low-income residents. To finance these policies and to improve transit on our streets, I will push for measures to limit congestion on our streets, especially near environmental justice communities, as a matter of transit equity and public health.
3. How will you ensure fast-tracked implementation of a city-wide network of off-street paths and protected bike lanes on major thoroughfares and connecting streets that are safe and comfortable for people of all ages and abilities?
Michel Denis
I am the only Boston City Council At Large Candidate who has said in writing that once elected, I would create a city wide neighborhood watch, that would meet monthly with the MBTA, BPD, BTD, and DND about the local crime, traffic concerns, bus schedules, train delays, and community ideas for improvements.
Annissa Essaibi-George
"Boston lags behind many other major cities, because we do not prioritize off-street paths and protected lanes. Boston is an old city and our streets are tight, but we can work within our older design to identify main thoroughfares for bikes, much like the Southwest Corridor, to get bikes their own space. Two examples of this are the Harborwalk in Dorchester (around the gas tank) which would open one corridor to the south and adding protected lanes to Mass Ave to Melnea Cass to accommodate a high volume of bike traffic. Realigning our urban highways, like Rutherford Ave in Charlestown would connect Downtown to the North. The realignment of the Pike in Allston will allow for a connection to West Station, Brighton, and beyond. More immediately, reducing lanes and implementing curbs like they are doing on Commonwealth Avenue near Boston University on our wide streets such as Summer Street in South Boston and Melnea Cass Blvd would lead to more dedicated, complete, off street networks."
Michael Flaherty
I will continue to advocate for these important transit solutions on the City Council, particularly in the budget process, as I have done in the past. During this past budget season, I supported and voted for an increase in the capital budget for the Strategic Bike Network from $1.25 million to $4 million and increase Vision Zero funding from $3.9 million to $12 million.
David Halbert
In order to reach this goal I will first work with advocates to engage residents at the local level to determine what connections will work best for their respective neighborhoods. As the contours and impacts on different parts of the city will be felt in very different ways. As this information is being compiled I will work with the necessary stakeholders in city government to determine how to most effectively and efficiently implement the findings once they are concluded - with realistic timetables set for accelerated establishment of this network determined and agreed to from the outset. I will also use my position and public profile to bring attention to the plan, via media and in communities, so that the general public becomes allies in maintaining the necessary pressure to keep the plan on track and accountable.
William King
I would partner with advocates like the Boston Cyclists Union who have examined the major thoroughfares and develop a plan to partner with the Public Works Department to ensure the vision is carried out.
Julia Mejia
I will look to cities that have implemented this successful and work with organizations and community groups that are already working with the city to implement these plans. I will work with the Mayor to expand efforts to create street diets in neighborhoods across the city working specifically to ensure that our neighborhoods that are primarily communities of color are not left behind. Too often the city has prioritized street safety in predominately white neighborhoods. Ensuring a racial equity lens is applied to street safety and bike safety will be a central part of my approach.
Erin Murphy
I am working with Greater Ashmont to develop and build the Dot Greenway project which will transform the Red Line tunnel cap in Dorchester into bike and pedestrian paths. There are several similar initiatives around the City I look forward to supporting.
Jeff Ross
Again, I think the answer lays in my role as a potential City Councilor, which would empower me to hold oversight hearings and hold the Mayor’s administration accountable, with a particular influence on the budget. BTD can do more, and despite our growing traffic and commuter concerns, there is no reason to neglect the other modes of transportation while grappling with a crisis. In fact, this is a key part to solving the bigger issue: We need more commuters and travelers to utilize alternative modes of transportation to relieve the pressure on our vehicle roadways. Without this balance, our transportation crisis will grow.
Alejandra St.Guillen
"In order to reach the goals of Vision Zero, we must commitment to installing and maintaining bike and pedestrian infrastructure (sidewalks, lanes, crosswalks, etc) to promote safety and mutli-modal mobility. Capital investment will be key to being able to fast-track implementation of a city-wide network of off-street paths and protected bike lanes. I support raising revenue to meet these investments. We need to partner with our State colleagues on areas that are covered by the State jurisdiction and advocate for more funding to implement these networks. The city should report progress on a quarterly basis with the ambitious goals set forth."
Michelle Wu
Creating networks of protected bike lanes and off-street paths are critical for expanding cycling access to people of all ages and backgrounds. One of our current hurdles is the lengthy timeline needed to plan and implement street redesign. We can fast-track projects by implementing improvements with simple, temporary materials like paint, signs, and flexposts through on-going maintenance work. Every street repaving project should be an opportunity to implement a Better Bike corridor. The same goes for bus-only lanes and tactical medians, or curb bump-outs for pedestrian safety. By leveraging ongoing work, we can build our way toward a more connected, sustainable transportation network in a smart, cost-effective manner. Once these improvements are in place, we can collect feedback and data, allowing us to tweak the design before making improvements permanent. I will continue to advocate for greater collaboration between the Public Works Department and the Transportation Department. Finally, we need to apply a network-based approach to our bike planning. Newly constructed protected infrastructure shouldn't just direct cyclists toward an unsafe street without bike infrastructure.

Additional Questions

1. Vision Zero is an approach which aims to eliminate traffic fatalities and serious injuries and has been adopted by Boston, Cambridge, and Somerville, and many other cities across the country. Do you support the principles of Vision Zero policies and funding for their rapid implementation?
Michel Denis
Strongly Support
I support Vision Zero. Once elected, I look forward to having a continued discussion on how best to integrate autonomous vehicles, EV electric vehicles, bikes, and pedestrians into Boston's 2030 Plan to make our city carbon neutral.

Annissa Essaibi-George
Strongly Support
Michael Flaherty
Strongly Support
David Halbert
Strongly Support
William King
Strongly Support
Julia Mejia
Strongly Support
Erin Murphy
Somewhat Support
Jeff Ross
Strongly Support
Alejandra St.Guillen
Strongly Support
Michelle Wu
Strongly Support
2. One key strategy that has been proven to effectively reduce speeding, improve safety, and remove racial bias in traffic enforcement in other states and countries is automated enforcement (i.e. speed cameras and red light cameras). Do you support S.1376, An Act relative to automated enforcement, which if passed would authorize cities and towns in Massachusetts to opt into the use of automated enforcement? To see the full text of the bill, go here.
Michel Denis
Strongly Support
I am the only Boston City Council At Large Candidate that has proposed that we include driver's education into the BPS curriculum, as well as include bike safety training and CPR. Traffic cameras would capture the license plate numbers, at all major intersections in Boston, to ensure safety, similar to the MassDOT automated toll system already currently in place. I also support the ACLU and their efforts to ensure that racial bias no longer exists in the Boston Police, and so once elected I will support automated cameras on traffic lights, as well as body cameras, dash cameras, etc.
Annissa Essaibi-George
Strongly Oppose
No. I think that the presence of Police Officers on our streets and in our communities makes our City safer. I also have concerns about how traffic cameras impact the privacy rights of Bostonians.
Michael Flaherty
Strongly Support
I have long been an advocate for increased police presence on our roads and more traffic enforcement due to safety concerns I regularly hear from my constituents. Unfortunately, there is not enough manpower in each police district to sufficiently police all the roads on top of their other duties. As a result, I support these camera policies for the sake of driver, cyclist and pedestrian safety.
David Halbert
Somewhat Support
While I am in support of the general goals and utility of automated enforcement tools for traffic management purposes I need to see more concrete proposals for the use of such data by law enforcement in non-traffic related contexts. Additionally I have concerns about particular neighborhoods and communities being noticeably more observed and impacted via higher levels of deployment of such technologies in their areas.
William King
Strongly Oppose
I oppose the Act because I don't think we should move in the direction of becoming a police state. Essentially all this does is cause fear and breaks down the trust between government and the people it serves. I support city surveillance cameras on intersections to monitor shootings or hit and runs, but I don't support automated traffic enforcement.
Julia Mejia
Strongly Support
Erin Murphy
Strongly Support
Jeff Ross
Strongly Oppose
Alejandra St.Guillen
Strongly Support
Michelle Wu
Somewhat Support
We need to reconsider our enforcement strategies when it comes to traffic violations and ensure equitable implementation to make our streets safer for all in the long-term. We should consider measures where people issued violations can opt for traffic safety classes in place of a fine, so that we're educating and encouraging a culture of safety and mutual respect on our roadways rather than adopting a purely punitive approach. I would also like to address surveillance and privacy concerns, with strong policies to protect civil liberties.
3. Do you support implementation of all of the Better Bike Corridors and other bike projects in the Go Boston 2030 Plan, and making sure all short-term projects are planned and implemented within three years, and long-term projects are implemented by or before 2030?
Michel Denis
Strongly Support
I am the only Boston City Council At Large Candidate that has said in writing that once elected, I will host monthly meetings with the MBTA, BPD, BTA, and DND to ensure that community concerns are being reviewed, tracked, addressed, recorded, and responded to immediately, with a follow up on a monthly basis. Under my plan, there will be two new check points established to the Go Boston 2030 Plan in 2024, and 2029, so as to ensure everything is on schedule by 2030.
Annissa Essaibi-George
Strongly Support
Michael Flaherty
Strongly Support
David Halbert
Strongly Support
William King
Strongly Support
Julia Mejia
Strongly Support
Erin Murphy
Somewhat Support
Jeff Ross
Strongly Support
Alejandra St.Guillen
Strongly Support
Michelle Wu
Strongly Support
4. Do you support creating age-friendly walking conditions in your community -- an issue raised by many seniors as critical to their ability to “age in community”? If yes, how?
Michel Denis
Strongly Support
I am the only Boston City Council At Large Candidate that has proposed walking sidewalks, similar to those in Logan Airport, in all Boston Municipal senior housing facilities by or before 2030. I would also explore the idea that then Boston District 5 City Councilor Rob Consalvo proposed in 2013 regarding adding rubber sidewalks around BHA Senior Housing Facilities. Last, but not least, once elected, I would create a partnership with my office, BPD, DND, and the Boston Elderly Commission to walk across the city to ensure that all major intersections have level, age friendly side walks.
Annissa Essaibi-George
Strongly Support
Michael Flaherty
Strongly Support
I have consistently led efforts to repair damaged sidewalks, especially in cases where tree roots have uprooted the sidewalk creating a dangerous hazard for seniors and the disabled. I also regularly process requests from constituents on faded crosswalks and signs that are in disrepair and have become a safety hazard. I also support addressing the issue of signal timing, which is insufficient for many residents.
David Halbert
Strongly Support
In areas of the city with high concentration of seniors, crosswalk lights should have additional time added to allow seniors to cross the streets and there should be sidewalk ramps for residents who use a wheelchair. Boston's aging population deserves to be heard on the issues that most impact their life and will help them to remain in the neighborhoods and communities they've built.
William King
Strongly Support
We need more public awareness and courtesy campaigns about bike ride share parking (making sure that bikes are not parked across sidewalks, blocking safe passing). Also, it is imperative to keep bike riders off sidewalks so seniors may have the mobility they deserve.
Julia Mejia
Strongly Support
I plan to work with the Department of Transportation specifically to prioritize lengthening the time allocated for crosswalks and where possible implementing street diets that create medians where pedestrians can safely wait to cross our bigger streets.
Erin Murphy
Strongly Support
Better enforcement of snow clearance on sidewalks, better maintenance of walkways and sidewalks in neighborhoods, more benches and places for seniors to rest during neighborhood walks.
Jeff Ross
Strongly Support
Alejandra St.Guillen
Strongly Support
Sidewalk improvements, increased signage at all crosswalks, curb cut maintenance and improvement
Michelle Wu
Strongly Support
I see Vision Zero as an effort to improve the everyday lives of our seniors, who may be especially vulnerable to road conditions that encourage speeding cars. I support the efforts of WalkBoston and neighborhood affiliates to conduct walk audits with community members, and the City should work closely to implement these necessary changes.
5. Do you support the restriction of on-street parking during rush hour in order to create dedicated bus lanes on certain major thoroughfares where bus riders experience significant delays due to traffic congestion?
Michel Denis
Somewhat Support
I am the only Boston City Councilor At Large Candidate that has pledged to support the people first, so that includes standing up for Boston residents who have valid stickers and permits to park their car in from of their own house. Under my new plan, major thoroughfares would get monorails, similar to Disney's Epcot Center, modeled after the old above ground orange line. Boston is the world's first public transit system, so I am also the only Boston City Council Candidate who has proposed using the South Boston underground Silverline model, for Brighton Ave, Comm Ave, and Blue Hill Avenue.
Annissa Essaibi-George
Strongly Support
Michael Flaherty
Strongly Support
I support this policy in areas where residents and businesses would not be adversely impacted. I would like to see a detailed transportation study on which roads this policy makes sense for around the city.
David Halbert
Somewhat Support
I believe that dedicated rush hour bus lanes, such as what has been implemented along Washington Street in Roslindale, can have a significant positive impact for those using mass transit and in encouraging others to switch to mass transit from personal vehicles. My concern is that, as this model seeks to be expanded, the city takes care to engage and provide parking options for those who otherwise would have their vehicles in those lanes - so that they may have the least disruption to their quality of life as possible.
William King
Strongly Support
Julia Mejia
Strongly Support
Erin Murphy
Somewhat Support
Until the MBTA provides consistently reliable to public transport to Boston residents, I hesitate to implement binding restrictions on commuters are at their wits ends trying to get to work and school on time.
Jeff Ross
Strongly Support
Alejandra St.Guillen
Strongly Support
Michelle Wu
Strongly Support
6. Do you support exploring new ways of raising revenue to provide Boston with more tools to improve conditions for people walking, using mobility assistive devices, biking, and using public transit (e.g. increasing the gas tax, implementing congestion pricing, increasing fees on Uber/Lyft)? If yes, please give examples that interest you.
Michel Denis
Strongly Support
Yes, I support implementing congestion pricing in partnership with MassDOT, DND, Fastlane, and BTD to charge non-Boston City Residents a fee to use our municipal streets, just like the state charges a toll to use Massachusetts Roads. I do not support increasing the gas tax, unless there is an EV electric vehicle charging station infrastructure, which I plan to propose as an amendment to the Boston 2030 Plan once I am elected. I would however support increasing fees on both Uber and Lyft, with the carbon neutral exception for Green Transportation, Hybrid, or Electric Uber and Lyft vehicles.
Annissa Essaibi-George
Strongly Support
Boston and Massachusetts as a whole are in a transportation crisis. Despite recent efforts to increase access to transit through non-motor vehicle means, there are still staggering deficits that need to be addressed immediately. I have always supported raising the gas tax with revenue going directly to transit-related investments. I support charging a fee for more than one parking permit per household with revenue being earmarked for similar projects, and I strongly support increasing fees on TNCs.
Michael Flaherty
Strongly Support
I support increased fees on TNCs, along with making sure we are appropriately taxing shared mobility devices like electric scooters as we build out the regulations on those devices. We need to make sure users of both these transit methods are paying their fare share for their use of the roads.
David Halbert
Strongly Support
"Collecting accurate and up-to-date property valuations on institutions subject to PILOT agreements, so that the direct financial contribution portion of the request is as robust and fair as possible. Congestion pricing, with a focus on how to hold harmless those at the lower end of the socio-economic spectrum who need to have access the the commercial core of the city for their livelihood and full civic participation. This would also necessitate more robust delivery of city services at the neighborhood level in order to protect against losses of equity and access. Increasing TNC fees."
William King
Strongly Support
I would support increasing gas tax, implementing a carbon tax, and working on way to get the most out of PILOT.
Julia Mejia
Strongly Support
I will work with the PILOT working group, I support congestion pricing as well as dynamic metered pricing.
Erin Murphy
Somewhat Oppose
Again, I believe public resources and elected officials should be focused on providing quality public transportation to citizens before we use measures like fines, ticketing, and tax increases (which are often perceived as punitive to regular citizens) to ease traffic and congestion and to decrease emissions.
Jeff Ross
Strongly Support
Alejandra St.Guillen
Strongly Support
Congestion pricing; increasing fees on Uber/Lyft; charging for residential stickers
Michelle Wu
Strongly Support
We need multiple options to raise sustainable revenues at the scale needed for a transportation that serves all residents. Our policies should create the right incentives to use sustainable transportation by offering people high-quality infrastructure and charging users according to their impacts, including raising the gas tax and congestion pricing. I also support increasing fees for ride-hailing companies, including more funding to cities and towns overwhelmed by ride-sharing. Finally, cities and towns should be able to raise revenue directly through Regional Ballot Initiatives.
7. Do you support the rollout of dynamic parking meter pricing in business districts, which would increase meter rates during periods of increased demand, to free up on-street parking and reduce cars “cruising” for open spaces?
Michel Denis
Strongly Support
Yes, I support dynamic parking pricing to ALL non-Boston residents, similar to the Fenway Park model that increases the cost of parking during Red Sox games. Once elected, any non-Boston resident would have an increased fee during periods of increased demand, so as to free up the city wide on-street parking for ALL City of Boston residents.
Annissa Essaibi-George
I support dynamic parking meter pricing in our downtown business districts where this problem is most prevalent (Financial District, Seaport, LMA, Fenway, Back Bay, Beacon Hill). In most outer neighborhood business districts, I would want to ensure that such a policy would pricing would not hurt small businesses if a problem does not exist.
Strongly Support
Michael Flaherty
Strongly Oppose
Parking downtown is already a financial burden on city residents, with garage fees that working people, who may not be able to use the T for varying reasons, cannot afford. I am concerned that increasing meter fees during high demand times will increase the handicap placard abuse that is already happening throughout our City, as put forth by a 2016 Inspector General Report. A recommendation of this report was to create a two-tier system that would grant the handicapped meter-fee exemption to placard holders who are physically unable to reach a parking kiosk or insert coins into a meter.
David Halbert
Somewhat Support
William King
Strongly Support
Julia Mejia
Strongly Support
Erin Murphy
Strongly Support
Jeff Ross
Strongly Support
Alejandra St.Guillen
Strongly Support
Michelle Wu
Strongly Support
I support better managing parking spaces by setting the right price. I also support Parking Benefits District, which would allow for investing the revenue from parking meters into communities locally, such as to our Main Streets districts for much-needed neighborhood improvements and projects.
8. Boston has many traffic signals that do not work well for pedestrians. Do you support making signal timing safer, easier, and more convenient for people walking and using mobility assistive devices at all paces?
Michel Denis
Strongly Support
I am the only Boston City Council At Large Candidate that has said in writing that I would make it a priority to ensure that all municipal traffic lights and walking signals are pedestrian friendly, and also include audio verifications, as well as sidewalk additions for the blind.
Annissa Essaibi-George
Strongly Support
Michael Flaherty
Strongly Support
David Halbert
Strongly Support
William King
Strongly Support
Julia Mejia
Strongly Support
Erin Murphy
Strongly Support
Jeff Ross
Strongly Support
Alejandra St.Guillen
Strongly Support
Michelle Wu
Strongly Support
9. Do you support charging an annual fee for residential parking permits?
Michel Denis
Somewhat Support
I am the only Boston City Councilor At Large Candidate who has said in writing that we should not penalize low income City of Boston residents. However, once elected, I would support Boston City Councilor Michelle Wu's proposal to charge an annual fee for residential parking permits. However, I am the only Boston City Council At Large Candidate who has proposed one residential parking sticker for the entire city, so that families and friends can visit each other.
Annissa Essaibi-George
Somewhat Support
I strongly support charging a fee for more than one parking permit per household (excluding seniors, and residents living on fixed incomes and in poverty.
Michael Flaherty
Strongly Oppose
At this time, I do not support charging for residential parking permits. I would like to see a complete audit done of existing spaces and their usage across the city before any policy is created and enacted. In many neighborhoods there is not enough parking and residents would be paying for a service that is therefore not available to them, making the policy inequitable. Further, the T is already too unreliable for Boston residents daily needs that it would be irresponsible to make the ownership of a car that residents need to go about their daily lives any more tedious or costly.
David Halbert
Somewhat Support
I support the overall goal of this proposal, reducing the amount of automobiles on Boston's streets. Initially the 1st vehicle registered to a discrete address should not be charged a fee. After that a permit fee for other vehicles is reasonable. For those who work outside of Boston, in areas where public transit is severely limited or functionally not an option, an automobile is often an unfortunate economic necessity. As a matter of fairness and equity, and where the proposed fee on 1st vehicles is so low, this would allow more residents to grow to accept and embrace the idea of fees for all
William King
Strongly Oppose
Julia Mejia
Strongly Support
Erin Murphy
Somewhat Oppose
It depends. Residents who live in the most dense neighborhoods often oppose resident parking schemes because it makes caring for the elderly and receiving family visitors more difficult. Any increase in residential parking fees and/or expansion of the program needs to be done in concert with neighborhood preferences and priorities.
Jeff Ross
Strongly Support
Alejandra St.Guillen
Strongly Support
Michelle Wu
Strongly Support
During this term on the Council, I held a hearing on better managing residential parking permits and introduced an ordinance proposing an annual residential parking permit fee of $25 for the first vehicle in a household, $50 for the second, etc., with exemptions for low-income residents, seniors, and public school and health care staff who need to travel to visit students or patients. Managing this parking would also allow us more flexibility to address residents' needs--my ordinance also proposed to create a visitor parking pass program.
10. Do you support reducing or eliminating MBTA fares for people with low income?
Michel Denis
Strongly Support
I am the only Boston City Council At Large Candidate who has proposed a free MBTA monthly pass for all City of Boston Employees, all BPS students, all BPS graduates participating in the RoxMapp Program, all City of Boston Seniors, and all qualifying low income, elderly US Citizens, US Veterans, and all low income Boston City Residents with a disability.
Annissa Essaibi-George
Strongly Support
Michael Flaherty
Strongly Support
I support my colleague Councilor Michelle Wu’s call that the T should be entirely free for all users, regardless of economic status, based on the outsized share of MBTA operating funds that Boston contributes and the overall environmental benefits of increased public transportation usage,. Not only will this will take more cars off the road and further reduce traffic congestion to alleviate bus delays, it has the added benefit of reducing our city’s carbon footprint to help preserve the environment for our children.
David Halbert
Somewhat Support
Reducing or eliminating MBTA fares for low-income riders is a significant step towards greater access and utilization of public transit. It could also significantly help with traffic and parking related issues in Boston. While I am in full support of these goals I also want to ensure that there are identified, and ideally dedicated, funding streams to offset the loss of revenue by the T. This becomes even more critical in this type of proposal as ridership would be expected to increase and further tax the operational capacity of the system.
William King
Strongly Support
Julia Mejia
Strongly Support
Erin Murphy
Strongly Oppose
Public transportation should be affordable for everyone. Seniors and BPS students should receive discounts, but otherwise, all riders of the MBTA should shoulder an equitable burden in terms of fares.
Jeff Ross
Strongly Support
Alejandra St.Guillen
Strongly Support
Michelle Wu
Strongly Support
I believe we need to Free the T for all, and that starts by lowering the barriers to those who depend on this service most. The MBTA’s fare hikes are regressive and impact low-income riders most. I have testified multiple times before the MBTA’s governing board in support of a low-income fare and will continue to do so. Based on the conclusions of a recent MIT study, which found that participants with a reduced fare made more trips by transit to medical services, such a program could be administered statewide through MassHealth.
11. Do you support ensuring large-scale developments (including Sullivan Square, the Allston I-90 Interchange, and Suffolk Downs) incorporate the community's desire for walkability, connectivity, open space, and resiliency?
Michel Denis
Strongly Support
Yes, I am the only Boston City Council At Large Candidate who has said in writing, that people should be able to walk, and or be able to take Green Transportation to work everyday.
Annissa Essaibi-George
Strongly Support
Michael Flaherty
Strongly Support
David Halbert
Strongly Support
William King
Strongly Support
Julia Mejia
Strongly Support
Erin Murphy
Strongly Support
Jeff Ross
Strongly Support
Alejandra St.Guillen
Strongly Support
Michelle Wu
Strongly Support
With some of these larger projects, we need to ensure we are making the necessary investments in public transit to influence how people travel to these areas. In Allston, we need to make sure that West Station is built now, as an interim mitigation measure during the I-90 reconstruction process.