Cambridge City Council 2019

Incumbents are indicated with *

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About the Candidate

Policy Proposals

Additional Questions

Sukia Akiba
(no answers submitted)

Burhan Azeem
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Dennis Carlone*
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Charles Franklin
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Craig Kelley*
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Derek Andrew Kopon
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Ilan Levy
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Alanna Mallon*
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Marc McGovern*
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Jeffery McNary
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Risa Mednick
(no answers submitted)

Gregg Moree
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Adriane Musgrave
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Patricia Nolan
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John Pitkin
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Sumbul Siddiqui*
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E. Denise Simmons*
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Ben Simon
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Jivan Sobrinho-Wheeler
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Tim Toomey*
(no answers submitted)

Nicola Williams
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Quinton Zondervan*
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About the Candidate

1. How do you move around your community and get to where you need to go?

2. What is a particularly dangerous problem or location in your community for people walking, biking, taking transit, or for people with disabilities that you'd like to see addressed?

3. Why do you think people who care about walking, biking, transit, and mobility issues should vote for you?

Burhan Azeem

My primary mode of transportation is my bike which I take to work and errands. I also walk and take public transit daily.

Bike safety is huge. On my way 30 minute commute to work, I often feel my life is in danger.

I understand these issues better than anyone else because I live these issues.

Dennis Carlone

I am multi-modal. I have a car which I use when I have back to back meeting across Cambridge but I walk and take the train where I can.

Inman Square and Porter Square are just a few of the dangerous intersections in the city. I have worked to decrease speed limits to 20MPH (we had most local streets declared safe zones) but we need to do more to ensure cyclist and pedestrian safety. We also need to add speed deterrents on through streets in residential areas: the streets parallel to Mass Ave in Cambridgeport are dangerous due to oversized, speeding vehicles. The crossing at Mass Ave and Garfield Street is unsafe for crossing especially at peak traffic periods. It should be replaced with a pedestrian controlled traffic light

I have been working to make streets safe for pedestrians and cyclists since I was elected in 2013, and before that as a city consultant. I am passionate in my support of a greener future so I am working with my colleagues to ensure our transit system is better for both people and the environment and to create a wealth of green transportation options. The most admired cities in the world offer inviting pedestrian environments, safe biking paths for all ages and a clean and efficient transit to all neighborhoods. Cambridge has to continue moving forward.

Charles Franklin

I walk most places, including to work. I use public transportation for further distances. I have a car, but I try to use it as infrequently as possible, and this summer has mostly been for picking up plants, dirt, and mulch (I probably fill my tank once a month at most.)

I used to bike as well as use a motor scooter (Vespa), but I had a few close calls and a couple of accidents. One of them I was lucky to walk away from. I had been avoiding biking for the past year, but have recently revived my BlueBikes membership. I still won’t bike on most streets.

Recently, the city declined to build a bike lane on Webster Ave, instead suggesting that cyclists bike down Tremont St. I live at the corner of Tremont St. and Hampshire St. and believe that intersection is treacherous, particularly when traversing Tremont. It’s a fairly blind intersection where cars crossing Hampshire St. are hard to see. It can be risky even for pedestrians. I’d like to see a stoplight there or slight changes to increase line of sight.

I understand the needs of non-personal car commuters, as I am one. In the past 5 years, I’ve gotten around by walking, biking, and taking the T. As such, I have experienced the same difficulties that face those who rely on safe streets and public transit to get around. I’ve been a strong advocate for sustainable commuting, including canvassing for bicycle safety in the city. I don’t have mobility issues myself, but I have friends that do and will take their input into account to make sure they can feel safe on the streets.

Craig Kelley

I bike virtually everywhere I go in the local area, as do my wife, Hope, and two boys when they are home from college. For longer local trips we use the MBTA and rent or borrow cars to go camping or visit our boys at college. For trips to NYC, we take a bus from Alewife. We reflect what the future of urban mobility should be- we use a personal vehicle only when other transportation won’t work. Our family-wide focus on bicycling is unexcelled by any family in Cambridge, though as Hope and I get older, we become increasingly worried about the dangers posed by other cyclists as well as drivers.

A particular problem non-drivers face is the lack of common norms for safe, responsible travel. The ad hoc adherence to the law creates dangerous levels of chaos and it’s not all due to cars and trucks, though they pose particularly significant hazards. New platforms like electric skateboards, scooters and onewheels crowd our public ways with little thought about where they belong or the rules they should follow. Delivery systems like Amazon and UBER create pop-up hazards for everyone, pedestrians crossing anywhere they want and CPD’s anemic traffic enforcement efforts add to our problems.

People who care about walking, biking and getting around without driving should vote for me because I am living that life and have lived it, with my entire family, for decades. I know just how dangerous bicycling is, how street safety is an issue in and out of Cambridge, how complicated the right solutions are and how all of us have a responsibility to put safety first. As evidenced by the two Micromobility events I organized this term, I have the vision and the experience to help Cambridge rethink our joint mobility future in a way that goes beyond our current bike/car/pedestrian thinking.

Derek Kopon

I do not own a car. I mainly bike, walk, and take the T. If I am going somewhere not accessible by public transit, I take an Uber pool or Lyft line.

The lack of a contiguous protected bike lane network is a major deficiency in our transportation infrastructure. Major stretches of Mass Ave still require cyclists to ride in the lane of traffic. This is very unsafe.

People who care about these issues should vote for me because I place a very high priority on emissions-free transportation, both for environmental and public health reasons. If we enable people to walk or bike whenever possible, we are encouraging them to be outside, exercise, and interact more naturally with their environment. While cars are necessary some of the time, cars create traffic congestion, noise, air pollution, greenhouse gas emission, etc. Our infrastructure should be designed to enable all forms of transit, especially those modalities that are most healthful to our citizens.

Alanna Mallon

I live near Central Square, so I primarily walk to work and meetings. I am an MBTA rider when I occasionally travel to Boston, and an occasional driver as well.

Massachusetts Ave is the main transit corridor in Cambridge, but it seriously lacks safe cycling and pedestrian infrastructure, particularly near Porter Square, where it is four lanes wide. We need much better crossing light signals for pedestrians. We also need to finish our protected bike network on Webster Ave, the Hampshire and Beacon Street connector, and on Garden St.

I have made improvements in our community, such as the Mass Ave, Western Ave, and Prospect St intersection in Central Square where I introduced a pedestrian super LPI to reduce conflicts with cars when crossing. I also had the City use State highway grants to increase traffic monitoring at Prospect and Broadway and Prospect and Hampshire intersections, particularly during rush hour. I also submitted a policy order to ask the City to work with MAPC to gather data about ridehail services on our streets, and establish pickup and drop off locations to minimize congestion and blocking bike lanes.


Marc McGovern

Mostly walking, driving or public transit

We have some very dangerous intersections in our city. That is why I filed a policy order back in 2014 that lead to the redesign of Inman Sq. That intersection is dangerous for everyone. Another intersection that is problematic is right out in front of City Hall. I have seen near misses on many occasions with cars turning left from Inman St. to Mass Ave., at the same time as cyclists are coming down Mass. Ave.

I have been a leader in addressing street safety in Cambridge. From calling for the redesign of Inman Sq., to supporting bike lanes on Cambridge St., to working with Cambridge Bike Safety and the City to author a first of it's kind ordinance to require dedicated bike lanes during major street construction. Vision Zero can't just be a plan on paper. We need to take the steps necessary to make it a reality.

Jeffery McNary

i walk and talk

alcohol induced travel

their safety and love of friends and relatives

Adriane Musgrave

For nearly 15 years, I have primarily traveled around town by bike and T. For various jobs in Boston I have often commuted down Beacon/Hampshire Street, Mass Ave, and along Memorial Drive before crossing the river. As I’ve been working more in Cambridge, I’ve been biking on all of our streets – major and minor. I also walk a lot since I can meet people in my neighborhood.

I frequently use the Red line (via the Davis T stop) as well as buses (the 77 and 83, mostly).

We own a car so I also drive occasionally.

Cambridge is a dense, compact city that is still mostly car-centric in design so there are several areas that are unsafe to walk or ride. We need to redesign our streets for people first, including:

- Mass Ave is the main artery through Cambridge. It's chaotic and dangerous. We must add protected bike lanes and enhance the crosswalks at every intersection.

- Our Squares are also dangerous. Fortunately, Inman redesign has started. Porter Sq. needs more protected lanes. The center of Harvard Sq. – both inbound and outbound – has long been a challenge, but recently made worse by Uber/Lyft.

People who care about walking, biking, and transit should vote for me because these are my primary modes of transportation. I live these experiences every day and have been doing so for over 15 years. I’ve experienced first-hand the three-fold increase in bike commuters as well as the degradation of our transit system. I served as a local leader during the #UnfairHikes rally to push for transit improvements and new funding streams. Plus, I'm a new mom who has just started family biking. I want to see my son exercise his independence so I want even more to make our streets safer for kids.

Patty Nolan

I usually use my city bike – an upright somewhat heavier bike for urban riding. I also have a road bike, and if I am going more than about 5 miles one way, I will more likely take that since my city bike is slow. I do pay attention to having a place to lock that bike and won’t leave it overnight in town, even locked. I occasionally use BlueBikes (am a member). If meetings are accessible to the T, I use the subway and also use MBTA buses. We also own a car and I use that, for example to visit my in-laws, but not usually around town who live in a place challenging to access by public transit

An issue close to my house in West Cambridge is traveling along Fresh Pond Parkway, since there is no good way to ride your bike or walk. The sidewalks are terrible and there is no bike lane. In general, the issue that I think is dangerous is that in many places there is not enough space for a cyclist, and a pedestrian and a car. Instead of having space allocated for each, usually only cars have designated lanes which are at least sometimes maintained, whereas in many places the sidewalks are not maintained and challenging for pedestrians and impossible for people with disabilities

I use all modes of transportation–I walk, bicycle and drive. I understand living in the city requires accommodation of all modes. During my years on School Committee, I advocated for safe routes to schools, for more walking and biking and bus use for students. I bring people together and am known to be a thoughtful, respectful policymaker who listens, always looks to best practice when assessing options, and is willing to fight for change. As someone who believes that our city needs to do a better job of listening and developing better solutions, I have a track record of effective advocacy.

John Pitkin

On foot and MBTA.

Inman Square. The reconfiguration now underway will make a complex intersection more hazardous by creating more than ten unregulated points of conflict between pedestrians and cyclists and a circuitous route for cyclists that will encourage risky shortcutting through the new pedestrian plaza. I would like to see this ill-advised project stopped in favor of safety improvements to the existing configuration and revival of the park in Vellucci Plaza.

My experience with citizen participation and oversight of municipal transportation planning and public ways, as chair of the 1973-75 Cambridge Transportation Forum and as member of the Board of Traffic and Parking (1974-93). My campaign is about bringing citizens (not corporations) to the center of the democratic process and decision-making in Cambridge. I specifically propose a new, citizen-led and staff-supported Cambridge Transportation Forum, modeled on the earlier Forum, to advise the City Council on transportation planning and policy and management of the public ways. We can do this!

Sumbul Siddiqui

I usually walk, ride the bus or use the T. If I have back to back meetings, I will drive ( I don’t own a car but use my parents if I need to). I broke my ankle in early 2018 and as a result, I had to use uber and also had to rely on my car. I love walking around Cambridge and try to do that as much as possible.

Residents have reported that they feel unsafe at four lane crossings, even when flashing yellow lights are installed. Earlier this summer, a small child crossing Massachusetts Avenue at Garfield Street with his mother was nearly hit by a car that had failed to stop at the flashing yellow lights. It is clear that “Pedestrian Crossing” signs and zebra pavement markings are insufficient. To address the issue, I support strengthening pedestrian safety measures, including full traffic signals and pedestrian-activated High Intensity Activated Crosswalk signals.

During my first term, I have been a strong advocate for improving bicycle infrastructure and pedestrian safety. I co-sponsored policy orders to improve bike lane connectedness, identify traffic-calming and safety features for the Fresh Pond Mall area, and install a pedestrian Super LPI at a congested intersection. If re-elected, I will continue to advocate for pedestrian and cyclist safety.

E. Denise Simmons

Depending upon the day, the schedule, and the need, I either walk, drive, or take public transportation.

The issue of motorists not being more mindful of opening their doors and "dooring" bicyclists continues to be an issue that we need to do a better job in spreading the word on. The City has started promoting the "Dutch Reach" method of opening doors, but we have not saturated the city with this.

I am someone who knows how to get things done on the Council, and I am someone who works to bring people together in finding common ground. Part of this is just my personal approach to problem-solving, and part of it is just down to experience and recognizing how our municipal system works.

Ben Simon

I take the MBTA, bike or walk.

Motorists present a danger to pedestrians and cyclists all over Cambridge. I think Cambridge should look into adopting a ""Green Wave"" traffic system like is done in many places in Germany: auto traffic is limited to designated number of streets and banned on others except for abutters. This reduces traffic, emissions and accidents, as well as frees up many streets for safer pedestrian and cyclist transport.

Also the private companies that rent bicycles and scooters particularly should be regulated and taxed to improve public transit, which is a better, more inclusive transit system.

Ever since learning about global warming in the 7th grade I have passionately believed that our transit system needs to be fundamentally changed. This idea that everyone needs a car to be an independent, respectable, American adult is so steeped into our culture because of decades of marketing telling us so, but we need to break from this thinking. I hope we can look forward to a future where urban transport is centered around an excellent public transit system, walking and cycling and cars are for serving emergency and mobility needs.

Jivan Sobrinho-Wheeler

I bike and walk to work near Harvard Sq and to my partner’s apartment in Inman most days, both of which can be dangerous places for pedestrians and cyclists. I also often take the bus and subway to get meetings.

Some sidewalks during my commute are covered with snow & ice in winter because Cambridge currently relies on property owners instead of having municipal snow removal like we do for the parts of the street that cars drive on. And last year I lost part of two teeth in a bike crash with a car in Cambridge, so the need for better pedestrian and bike infrastructure is personal for me.

Porter, Harvard, and Central Squares in Cambridge are often dangerous commutes as a pedestrian or cyclist. I bike through Harvard Sq on my way to work and am worried myself a pedestrian will be hit by a distracted Uber or tour bus driver. We need protected bike lanes in all our squares and infrastructural changes like floating bus stops and traffic calming measures. In Cambridge, streets were designed before cars and driving on them is often frustrating. By making it easier to get around by public transit, bike or foot we can move towards the people-centered design our city was created for.

I usually walk or bike to work, and I get to volunteer work on public transit. The vast majority of our city has a similar commute—surveys show most Cantabrigians don’t commute by car—because they don't have free parking at work. But our current City Council does. We need to elect people who understand how dangerous & inefficient our streets are now.

Our campaign has the ambitious goal of making buses and subways free for Cambridge residents by 2025. We also need to add miles of bus-only lanes and complete the bike network—including PBLs on all of Mass Ave, Hampshire, and Cambridge streets.

Nicola Williams

I walk most of the time, take the bus, or the T. I also carpool as much as possible, depending upon the task.

Central Square cross streets at Prospect Street and Mass Ave is dangerous. They need to limit the size of big rigs coming through the city, require extra mirrors for blind spots and protected bike lanes.

I'll work with other municipality leaders in our neighboring cities on a regional strategy to support their issues. Transit safety represents a pivotal intersection of the issues I care about: accessible & affordable transit, environmentalism, and equity. That's why I've taken the Cambridge Bicycle Safety pledge. I've also been in touch with Cambridge Bicycle Safety group in March to discuss bicycle and pedestrian safety, particularly how Cambridge Bicycle Safety can work with local businesses in helping to achieve their goal of protected bike lanes through all of Mass Ave.

Quinton Zondervan

Depending on distance and timing I walk, bike, use public transportation, or drive my electric car. I have been a bicycle commuter for most of my life, and that is my preferred mode of transit, but as I am still recovering from a hip replacement, currently I can only commute by bike a few days per week.

In my first term I worked on a first in the nation bike safety ordinance that commits the city to building protected bicycle infrastructure whenever a major road that is on the city’s bicycle plan undergoes major repair or redesign. I also worked on reducing speed limits to 20 MPH by declaring safety zones on almost all city side-streets, which will take effect very soon. I also regularly ask for safety improvements and protected bicycle infrastructure at specific intersections or along specific routes, including recently on Webster, River St., Broadway, Hampshire and Mass. Ave. among others.

I have consistently voted and advocated for significant traffic safety improvements throughout the city, including a difficult vote early in the term to redo Inman Sq. with protected infrastructure, despite significant opposition from many of my supporters to that particular project. I consistently prioritize traffic safety for our most vulnerable road users, and I am committed to reforming our car-centric transportation model into a safer and more sustainable model based on public transit, bicycle and pedestrian primacy over cars.

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Policy Proposals

1. How will you ensure implementation of the infrastructure changes needed to slow traffic on your community's streets, and improve crosswalks and intersections to make them safer for people who are walking and using mobility assistive devices?

2. How will you improve the reach, frequency, and quality of public transit in Boston?

3. How will you ensure fast-tracked implementation of a city-wide network of off-street paths and protected bike lanes on major thoroughfares and connecting streets that are safe and comfortable for people of all ages and abilities?

Burhan Azeem

We need to push our city manager. Somerville does far more to improve crosswalk and bike safety and that is because they have a strong mayor that buys into the changes. Our city manager does not, we need to push him to do so or get a new city manager.

The state does not understand how much our cities rely on the MBTA - we need municipal representation.

By law.

Dennis Carlone

I am proud to have worked to lower speed limits on most side streets in Cambridge to 20 MPH. I continue to work toward increasing protections for cyclists and pedestrians - we need to prioritize these modes of transportation. I would like to see improvements to our transit system in addition (including city-sponsored shuttles to underserved neighborhoods), both for accessibility and affordability so that all people have the option to use these methods instead of driving. Crosswalks at dangerous intersections need improved signalling to protect pedestrians with strollers and mobility issues especially. Including car-free zones in areas of our city would be a good step towards reducing emissions and increasing safety.

The MBTA is not meeting the needs of its users. I firmly believe that access to transportation is a human right, along with housing and food. In our society, we cannot live without it and with soaring property prices more and more people are commuting to their jobs from far afield. We need to improve and increase the bus lines to expand the net of service. Funding the MBTA will help with this goal, and support from our wealthies institutions (Harvard and MIT) will be vital. We need to work together as a council to put pressure on the Statehouse to lift the austerity measures in place which are contributing to the deterioration of the MBTA. We need to use the power of City Special Permit process such as making CambridgeSide provide a shuttle service to the RedLine that was free for anyone to use. In the first year, 500,000 people used the service.

We need to work to push more bike safety ordinances and ensure the creation of protected bike lanes doesn't have to wait until a street is redone. First of all, it needs to be comprehensive and include related pedestrian improvements where needed. Many people ride a bike but everyone is a pedestrian. I plan to push the council and our city manager to use our considerable resources to increase transit options - increased shuttles in areas that are underserved but in need, like the Alewife shuttle, as well as better protected bike lanes, and more pedestrian paths. We need to ensure these lanes are spaced appropriately and well designed to mitigate any more tragedies.

Charles Franklin

We must show the city that these changes are a priority for the council, the residents, and commuters. The council can add policy orders to general meeting agendas which gives the public an opportunity to speak on the record. The policy orders themselves can be designed to push the city to hold community meetings so they can hear more directly what we need to feel safe on the streets.
I attended a rally recently when the city declined to add protected bike lanes to Webster Ave. These types of events get the attention of the community at large and are hard to ignore.

The ultimate tool to force the city to move forward with implementing road safety improvements is to pass a city ordinance. Recently, an ordinance was passed requiring the city to add protected bike lanes to streets specified by the city’s official bike network plan when the street is redone.

The MBTA currently does not do a good job of serving all of Cambridge’s residents. Some areas like North and West Cambridge only serviced by busses that run once every hour. This is too slow.

I will push the City Council/Manager to provide its own assessment of where we need new bus lines, and to determine what changes to the bus schedule are needed to better serve our residents.

I would also ask the City Manager to see if there are additional infrastructural improvements we can make to reduce bus dwell times and headways, e.g., by adding more bus lanes where appropriate.

However, there is also only so much influence we can have on the MBTA, as it is a state organization. I am in favor of Cambridge having its own short minibus transit system parallel to the MBTA. Perhaps we could model it after Lexington’s Lexpress system. I believe many tight-looped bus-lines connecting key points in the city will increase use of public ridership as well as give greater access to mobility limited residents.

As stated before, an ordinance was recently passed requiring the city to add protected bike lanes to streets specified by the city’s official bike network plan when the street is redone. This is a great step forward, but we can't wait until a street is scheduled to be redone. A bike lane or off street path should always be under construction. Again, this requires pressuring the city manager to act more swiftly to identify the most dangerous roads and intersections for cyclist and pedestrian safety improvements. Policy orders and public demonstrations have proven themselves successful in the past to move him forward on important issues, and we will continue to employ them.

Craig Kelley

I will continue to advocate for slower speed limits in Cambridge, something I helped pass as the City went to a 20 MPH limit on most streets but in many places even 20 MPH is too fast. City staff says it will take years to get all the streets appropriately signed with this new limit and I will continue to push for increased funding and staffing to make this implementation happen faster. Slower speeds, to include the speeds of cyclists and other non-car platforms, make everyone safer. I will work for faster responses to sidewalk safety issues through better implementation of See/Click/Fix responses and will continue to work to get the City to properly sign (and enforce) pedestrian-only sidewalk areas like Central Square. I will work with traffic staff to review our traffic signal timing, timing that often does not allow slower walkers enough time to cross the street and I will support infrastructure changes, like the median strips on Mt. Auburn, that force drivers to slow down and will work with city staff to improve our intersection treatments to increase the yield percentage at crosswalks for both car and cyclists/scooters/skateboards.

The City can do much to improve public transit. The City must ensure bus stops are used only for buses. I am currently coordinating a study with the Harvard Kennedy School that is reviewing how effective CPD and Parking Control Officers are at keeping people from illegally parking in bus stops, an offense that may seem minor to the offender but can be very impactful to anyone trying to get onto, or bicycle past, a bus that cannot access the curb because of an illegally parked car. The City also needs to do a better job of installing and updating “Next Bus” type notification systems because a significant reason people do not take buses is because they are not sure when the next bus is coming. In conjunction with the MBTA, the City needs to implement bus priority lanes that buses will actually use, which may require City investment in specific contracted transit support to help the T meet very time specific transportation peak needs. As ride-hailing apps change the face of transportation, the City must work more effectively with both TNCs and taxis, as well as private transit systems, to create a seamless system of network-based transit options that fill in gaps in our MBTA lines.

] I have not owned a car for over a decade and my family gets around town almost entirely by bike. I understand the complex dangers of bicycling and nothing is more important to me than bike safety. Where the City has a safe design for bicycling, such as the contra-flow lane on Brattle Street, I am supportive. Unfortunately, the City has a history of creating dangerous, sometimes deadly, bicycle facilities like the bike lanes in Central Square where a cyclist was killed by a bus soon after their installation. The idea of removing the North Mass Ave Median Strip for any reason fills me with fear for myself, my family and the thousands of other people who use that stretch of road. Getting rid of the Median Strip, something the City first planned over 20 years ago, would make the street more dangerous for all users, especially cyclists. Removing parking at specific choke points along the Avenue would be a much better safety solution, as would creating a bikeway along Sherman Street from Rindge to Huron. Addressing intersection conflicts with stanchions, forcing cars to be slower and more deliberate in their turns, would make streets safer as would better traffic enforcement policies.

Derek Kopon

While the city has made progress with traffic calming measures at a few locations in the city, these changes are proceeding gradually with many intersections and streets still needing more attention to make them safer. Just to list a few examples, there are stretches of Linnaean, Garden, and Concord Ave where cars frequently barrel down the road and then come to a rapid stop if there is a pedestrian in the cross walk. One crosswalk on Concord Ave. in particular has a pedestrian crosswalk directly after a series of parked cars, so oncoming drivers do not see the person in the crosswalk until the person has passed the front of the parked car. The result is drivers frequently slamming on the breaks. One could imagine a whole host of traffic calming measures that could be implemented here, such as curb extensions, a polymer overlay to change the texture and color of the crosswalk relative to the road, a raised crosswalk, etc. Like our network of protected bikes lanes, which is discontinuous, our crosswalk safety and traffic calming measures need to be applied everywhere in the city consistently and uniformly.

The branch of public transit most in need of upgrades and infrastructure improvements, the T, is not directly under the purview of the City of Cambridge or the City Council. The red line has been operating at (or sometimes over) capacity for some time, with virtually no substantial infrastructure improvements in decades. I first rode the red line during a summer internship at MIT back in 2002. Since then, the only noticeable changes to the red line in 17 years are a change in seat covers and the change from tokens to the Charlie Card (personally, I miss the tokens). Two months ago, Kendall square leaders publicly declared a transportation emergency with particular attention and criticism given to the MBTA T and bus infrastructure. Lack of sufficient municipal planning and infrastructure improvement have left us in a situation where, to quote the Kendall square leaders, “Today’s red line travelers in Kendall Square often find themselves on full trains and crowded platforms, sometimes getting left behind…The increase of passengers will greatly exacerbate today’s problems.” I will pressure the state legislature to provide funding and priority to these problems.

I support rapid implementation of the 2015 Cambridge Bicycle Plan. I personally do not feel safe when I am biking on the roads of Cambridge, particularly along Mass Ave and any other major thoroughfare that does not have contiguous protected bike lanes. The current city council is simultaneously trying to encourage people to bike and use public transport by getting rid of minimum parking requirements on new development, yet not moving nearly quickly enough to provide cyclists the safe infrastructure with which to do so. Every morning, I see cyclists trying to navigate the area between moving automobile traffic and parked cars, whose driver-side doors can open at any moment. It is dangerous and irresponsible that we still do not have a contiguous network of protected bike lanes. In line with the Cambridge bicycle safety pledge, I will do everything in my power—including voting with the City Council and working with the City Staff— to ensure that the City of Cambridge installs continuous protected bicycle lanes along the entire length of Mass Ave. These improvements should also include bus transit priority and pedestrian safety improvements, where feasible and applicable.

Alanna Mallon

The Council has reduced speeds to 20mph in all Squares, and also asked Traffic and Parking to produce a list of hundreds of streets to be reduced to 20mph, prioritizing the most dangerous to go first in the fall. I also support installing speed cushions to enforce these reduced speed limits. I have also worked to keep large trucks off of our side streets, and asked the City to work with navigation apps like Google Maps and Waze to keep our side streets from becoming major thoroughfares.

As a Councillor, I make it my priority to be constantly out in the community to understand the needs of our residents. That’s why I introduced a policy order to ask for more bus service on Concord Ave, and opposed many of the MBTA’s “improvements” to the Better Bus Project, which would decrease service to many residents who rely on bus service. I also supported Councilor Michelle Wu’s efforts in opposing the MBTA fare hike, as well as her myriad of alternatives for raising revenue for the T that do not put the burden on to lower income riders.

I maintain a close working relationship with Cambridge Bicycle Safety and support their efforts to complete our protected bike network - especially efforts to identify key transit corridors that could be rapidly served by quick build solutions. I also think income should be a larger part of this discussion. For too many families, a bike is a luxury, and I have already proposed a partnership between cycling advocates, the CHA, and the City to establish a low income bike program. This would give our low income residents access to bikes and the skills to repair and maintain them.

Marc McGovern

I supported Cambridge reducing speed limits in our city to 25 mph. I think we can even drop those limits to 20 mph in many areas. I would like to see better coordination of traffic signals. I have taken action and will continue to take action to install crosswalks and stop signs in areas to slow down traffic. I also think we need to launch a public education campaign about the dangers of speeding.

I supported the City of Cambridge investing $25 million to ensure funding for the Green Line Extension. I supported Cambridge implementing bus only lanes. I would like to see the city invest more in improvements to the Red Line. I would like to see the roll out of more bus only lanes.

As mentioned previously, I brought Cambridge Bike Safety and the City together to author a first of it's kind ordinance to implement protected bike lanes during major street construction. I will continue to push for pop up and quick build lanes, as I did with Cambridge St. and Brattle St. I will continue to advocate for additional funding toward building out our bike infrastructure network and I have signed the Cambridge Bike Safety pledge to call for this network to be completed within five years.

Jeffery McNary

feedback from residents via policy pods with experts and residents and colleagues

on the ground interaction with regularity

demand enforcement of current regulations

Adriane Musgrave

Cambridge has been making good progress on traffic slowing by reducing the speed limit to 20 MPH, enhancing crosswalks with lights, and requiring that street reconstructions add protected bike lanes. More work is needed. Cars still disregard the speed limit; many crosswalks are still unsafe; and we need a full network of protected lanes to create cycling safety. These are important issues to me and I’ve seen how they get passed. As city councilor, I will follow the playbook by focusing my attention to street safety, collaborating with city staff, and rallying our residents to build community pressure.

I served as a local leader during the #UnfairHikes #FixTheT rally to push for transit improvements and new funding streams. As a city official I will use my role to advocate for state-level improvements and push locally for change.

- Better Buses: Cambridge hosts one-third of the key bus routes in the metro area (1, 66, 71, 73, and 77). I want to make the 71/73 bus pilot project permanent and extend the 77priority lane into Cambridge. Other key routes and high-use local routes (47 & 70) should be next.

- Kendall Sq./Cambridge Crossing: We must find new ways to get commuters in/out of this critical commercial corridor via mass transit. Priorities include the Grand Junction transit concept; pushing for Kendall Sq. T improvements, which is the 8th busiest and 5th fastest growing stop in the system; advocating for the Red-Blue line connection; and creating dedicated bus lanes in the area.

- Transit deserts: a large portion of the city is not served by any route offering all-day frequent service so we should explore and test new models, including micro-mobility options.

- Ride-Hailing: Explore options to regulate ride-hailing firms to re-incentivize public transit.

In May the city launched the 2020 Bike Plan update process that will take 18 months. It is critical that protected bike lanes top the priority list since they are the best way to ensure safety. Having the city commit to building lanes will allow us to hold our city government accountable to the promises we have collectively made as a community.

But we also can’t wait 18 months for change. We know they are the safest options; we know the most dangerous stretches of road; and we know the roads with the highest bike traffic. Every year we should build 4 miles of dedicated lanes if we are to reach out goal of creating a connected network. But this year we built none. I stand with Cambridge Bike Safety in calling for Mass Ave, our most dangerous stretch of road, to be our next top priority.

In passing the first-in-the nation ordinance requiring that protected lanes be built when roads are reconstructed, we learned how to win key policy advancements. It requires applying focused attention on bike safety solutions, collaborating with city staff, and rallying our residents to build community pressure. I plan to follow this winning playbook when elected.

Patty Nolan

City Council’s role starts with passing policies and ordinances for infrastructure changes. The change to a maximum speed of 20 mph in all major squares started with an idea, followed by community advocacy, discussion by the Council, review and vote. Without community ideas, advocacy and support, changes like that don’t happen. It’s a prime example of how to enact positive change. More review of speed limits is necessary. And, the design of streets to ensure safety like bump outs at crosswalks, needs to include the community.
I would approach these changes through good governance process: identify options, work with a range of groups to decide which are the most promising, bring together city and community folks to discuss how to best implement, and decide which ones to implement under a clear timetable. Often people need multiple ways and times to learn about possible changes. Background, research and rationale must be included or change is resisted. The Council has a very important role in accountability and oversight – a power it should use more. Cambridge needs to make use of technology to communicate AND to generate data about the safety and effectiveness of policies.

A key reason people use their cars is public transit is unreliable, and/or not very accessible. Working with the MBTA, the city need to look at each bus routes potential –explore how to increase frequency of buses along major routes & implement bus only priority sections, like the pilot on Mt. Auburn Street. Buses on the major arteries are not frequent enough, especially for non traditional commuting hours. Plus, I would advocate strongly for more continuous routes – instead of the current system requiring transfers in Harvard or Central Square. Another lapse is the lack of a north –southbus through Cambridge – that is another key route the T should serve.

For the subway, the city needs to work with the T to increase the capacity of the overloaded Red Line. The new cars in process should help, yet the signaling system has to be improved to increase frequency of trains at rush hour, so no one ever thinks taking a car is faster. The lack of a connection between the new Green Line Extension to the Red Line – at either Davis or Porter – is astonishing. That is unlikely to be fixed soon, but thinking long term, it is essential, like the North South commuter rail link

The key to effective governance is oversight, monitoring and systems of accountability. The 2015 Cambridge bike plan is a comprehensive document that lays out the issues and presents information clearly & allows people to understand the city’s infrastructure and safety and comfort levels as a whole. The documentation of need– the visual color coding of which streets are which comfort level for cyclists – presents a framework for developing a city-wide network of paths and protected bike lanes to enable safe travel throughout and across the city. Making that plan a reality will require focused attention, a timetable that is public, and regular reporting of progress to the Council, and all bike citizen groups – to ensure accountability. Too often plans are not followed through because accountability is not clearly stated and monitored. Gaining agreement on a timetable that is appropriately fast will require a willingness to push back if there is a reluctance to agree to a specific timetable. A good way to ensure implementation is to have a public dashboard with milestones and dates – so on a regular basis, everyone in the city (or outside) can see progress towards the goals

John Pitkin

In my Mid-Cambridge neighborhood the first step would be to determine problem spots and what infrastructure changes would help. On the main streets, Cambridge Street, Broadway, Prospect Street, enforcement should be the main tool. The last thing we should be doing is creating obstacles that slow T buses. On longer side streets with through traffic as well as Harvard Street, speed bumps such as those on Rindge Avenue should be considered. There are a number of crosswalks without signals on Mass. Ave. in Mid-Cambridge, where an actuated flashing light, as on Beacon Street at Cooney (Somerville), could be tried. In general and especially for other neighborhoods and development districts, I would rely input from residents at a Transportation Forum for guidance. I am not a traffic expert.

I think the City should strive to increase the speed, punctuality, frequency and comfort of bus service through, to and from Cambridge. I support more bus priority lanes and signals, as on Mt. Auburn Street. Information on bus arrival times should be displayed at all major stops.
I would advocate for a new commuter rail stop and more frequent service near Alewife.
Since I am not an expert on citywide transit needs, again, I would look to input from residents at a new Transportation Forum for guidance on where there are needs that could be addressed by new services to underserved areas. Cambridge is growing and so should our transit system.

Here especially I would look to a new, representative Transportation Forum for guidance. Our streets are a complex system that must work for all users (including tradespeople, delivery vehicles, transit and school buses, ride services for elderly and handicapped, emergency vehicles, and customers of local and neighborhood businesses), and a one-size-fits-all approach is probably not workable. Continued, representative and responsible public input and oversight will expedite successful implementation.

Sumbul Siddiqui

This term, I have promoted traffic-calming measures and improvements to our bicycle infrastructure. To increase bicycle ridership and decrease motor vehicle speed, I supported the “Cycling Safety Ordinance.” To improve pedestrian safety, I co-sponsored a policy order to identify traffic-calming and safety features for the Fresh Pond Mall area as the current conditions in the lot compromise pedestrian and bicyclist safety by failing to clearly separate where vehicles should travel and where to expect pedestrians and cyclists moving safely. To protect pedestrians in congested areas, I joined another colleague, Councillor Alanna Mallon, in installing a pedestrian Super LPI at the intersection of Mass Ave, Prospect St., and Western Ave to give pedestrians a 10-15 head start on traffic.

To increase efficiency, I support the creation of separate bus lanes on major corridors. This will make bus routes run more smoothly, creating an incentive for commuters who currently get to work in single-rider vehicles to switch to a more environmentally friendly and traffic-reducing alternative. I also support more residential construction within walking distance of a T stop or frequently running bus line. For example, we should consider upzoning along Prospect St. between Central Square and Inman Square, in light of the future Green Line stop at Union Square. I would also keep in mind the populations that most need access to public transit, such as disabled people and senior citizens. New infrastructure and housing built should accommodate these folks, as it may be harder for them to bike or walk long distances.

To improve reach, I support measures to reduce MBTA fares. Our ultimate goal should be to eliminate fares altogether, and move towards a system of free public transit; the price of a train ride shouldn’t keep anyone from making it to school or work. I am also supportive of shuttle bus service.

Research indicates that people are far more likely to use protected bike lanes than unprotected ones, and I am supportive of capital investments to create protected bike lanes. This term, I co-sponsored the Cycling Safety Ordinance, which requires the City to construct permanent protected bike lanes on all streets identified for reconstruction under our Five Year Sidewalk & Street Plan. Requiring these lanes to be constructed as part of existing infrastructure projects will ensure that they remain a priority and are built in a timely manner. I also co-sponsored a policy order supporting the implementation protected bike lanes on Webster Ave, Museum Way, O’Brien Highway, and Craigie Bridge.

Cambridge Bicycle Safety has identified top-priority streets for constructing protected bike lanes, including the length of Massachusetts Avenue, Hampshire Street, Broadway Street, and other high bicycle-traffic roads. These recommendations can guide our efforts to implement protected bike lanes. Finally, as many who work in Cambridge live in Somerville and vice versa, we should prioritize collaboration with Somerville to build protected bike lanes on connecting streets between the two cities.

E. Denise Simmons

In Cambridge, the City Council works both by issuing work orders to our City Manager, to ensure that he prioritizes those items that we urge him to; and we also have the bully pulpit, which we can utilize to put public pressure on the City administration to take specific actions. I will continue to utilize both of these avenues.

We made a big step towards this by voting in favor of allocating millions of dollars to the Green Line extension in Union Square. I think we are going to need to turn up the public pressure on the Baker administration, though, in order to address the issues that continue to plague the MBTA.

I have voted in favor of this citywide network, with the caveat that there's wrong way to the right thing. "Faster" is not always "wiser," and I want the City to move with deliberate speed in this process - but I do not want this done *at the expense* of planning to protect against unintended consequences (for example, I would not want a stretch of protected bicycle lanes to be situated in such a way that an ambulance could no longer be parked in front of a senior building). This is why the City needs to work deliberatively and collaboratively with all stakeholders to ensure this is done as quickly as possible, but also as thoughtfully as possible.

Ben Simon

The prevalence of for-profit bicycle and motorized scooter companies, while nominally environmentally friendly pose there own environmental concerns and pose a danger to pedestrians, especially the elderly and children. Consequently we should regulate and tax these companies and use the revenue generated to pay for improvements to transit infrastructure improvements such as traffic calming measures like raised intersections. But I think even better than trying to produce safe driving behavior by changing our infrastructure, we should be looking into ways to incentivize people to not drive at all. An excellent, fully-funded public transit system that functioned better and more cheaply for the consumer (maybe it could be free?) would be a good way to do that.

The MBTA is criminally underfunded and I think that is the biggest obstacle to improved service. Public Transit is a public good and as so it should be on the state's books instead of being run like a private business as it currently is. We should look into ways to tax our local 1% to raise revenue to support our public transit and support similar efforts at the state level like State Rep. Mike Connolly's bill HD 2849. Harvard, MIT, big tech and big pharma are enormously profitable institutions that are completely reliant on the MBTA to exist, and yet the pay next to nothing in taxes. Harvard for example is the second wealthiest private non-profit in the world after only the Vatican(!), they pay significantly lower PILOTS than other universities and they are failing to pay the agreed on amounts! They must pay more in taxes and that revenue can help to make improvements to the MBTA as well as other desperately needed social spending projects like the creation of social housing.

I would like to add that transit improvements are known to cause displacement to vulnerable communities so I would want to push for tenant protections and anti-displacement zones alongside any improvements.

I am not well-informed on the city process for approving and implementing this infrastructure so I'm unsure how to respond other than to say that I would learn it and support this infrastructure to the utmost I am able as a city councillor. As I've mentioned above though, I'm generally anti-car and would love to push for getting them entirely off certain streets, leaving them open for safer walking and biking. But I recognize that this may be a less immediately realizable goal politically speaking and so protected bike-lanes and bike paths are something to fight for right away.

It's often good though to have a more radical long-term demand and a less radical short term one at the same time, as the ""scariness"" of the more radical one to the powerful people and institutions that benefit from the status quo may encourage them to accept the less scary one. This was seen recently in Berlin when a massively popular movement to nationalize buildings of some of the biggest corporate landlords and add them to the social housing stock led to a 5-year rent freeze.

Jivan Sobrinho-Wheeler

Municipal sidewalk snow removal will make it easier and safer for pedestrians in Cambridge’s long winters. It will reduce traffic by enabling older and disabled who may otherwise be car-dependent to walk more as well. We also need to implement traffic tables and bump outs to ensure cars aren’t treating heavily populated sections of Cambridge like highways.

Completing the city-wide network of protected bike lanes will not only make our streets less dangerous for cyclists, it will also make them safer for pedestrians by calming car traffic. We need to add both temporary “quick-build” lanes and push for the kind of permanent protected bike-lanes that are mandated by the Cambridge Cycling Safety Ordinance I helped push for with Cambridge Bike Safety. Studies show that protected bike lanes calm traffic and reduce conflicts between cyclists, drivers, and pedestrians on confusing sections of streets and intersections. Along with pedestrian and bus infrastructural changes, they send the message that our streets are for everyone, whether or not you can afford a car.

Public transit is at the core of our Cambridge Green New Deal proposal. Improving buses and subways means fewer car emissions, but it also means improving commutes for thousands of lower-income people and people of color who depend on public transit to get to work, to doctor’s appointments, and to live their lives. It’s a way of tackling climate change, income inequality, and racial inequity at the same time.

That’s why we’re pushing to make buses and subways free for Cambridge residents by 2025. Our plan involves purchasing monthly passes for Cambridge residents—half of whom already qualify for discounts because they’re under 18, students, over 65, etc—paid for by congestion pricing, PILOT payments from our two universities with $1 Billion+ endowments, and progressive property taxes. This will also add revenue to the MBTA to help fix the T.

We’ll also push for bus priority lanes, bus-rapid transit, and local micro-transit. As the Mt Auburn St traffic study made clear, on some streets more than half of people commute by bus but 90% of vehicles are cars. By making it easier to commute by bus we create a virtuous cycle reducing traffic and improving commutes.

Along with fellow members of Cambridge Bike Safety, I helped push for the Cambridge Cycling Safety Ordinance, which mandates the addition of protected bike lanes to major streets in Cambridge when they are due for reconstruction. But we also need to demand that the city move faster to save lives and add protected bike lanes along the city-wide network now.

In Cambridge, the City Manager, who serves at the will of the City Council, oversees city staff in deciding when protected bike lanes, bus priority lanes and pedestrian improvements will be added to streets. As a Councilor, I'll bring the activist approach I’m used to from local organizing work to city government and keep pressure up to implement what the vast majority of Cambridge residents have said they want—safer streets, improved public transit, and a city-wide bike network.

One other piece of creating a network in Cambridge is improving Memorial Dr, which is run by the state DCR. Right now, there are 4 lanes of cars and a narrow sidewalk for cyclists, runners, and walkers. As a Councilor, I'll use my platform to demand a safe-streets redesign reducing traffic to two lanes and expand the bike and walking paths.

Nicola Williams

Through my work as a board member of Harvard Square Neighborhood Association, I have also been supporting the efforts of the Memorial Drive Alliance – comprising of environmentalists, bicycle groups, and others. Our shared goals are saving the trees along Memorial drive and adding separate bike lanes in part on Memorial Drive itself, thus limiting vehicular traffic to two lanes and bike lanes to two lanes. This will reduce traffic and make it safer for people who are walking and using mobility assistive devices so they don't have to negotiate with cyclists.

The MBTA has largely been a huge disappointment for Cambridge residents. While fares have gone up, service has gone down. We just received word that Red Line services would not return to their normal speed until October, which will mean longer commutes and likely more packed trains. We need to increase the amount of trains operating, the number of cars, and expand access to areas that have been left out geographically and economically. This will take strategy, pressure, and investment from the many wealthy institutions that call Cambridge and Greater Boston home (such as MIT and Harvard). That's why I want to talk to other city councils across the region to put pressure on the state and allow us to transform the service and reach of the MBTA, within our communities, to make it equitable and inexpensive.

As I have said before, as a community activist, I've already been working to do just this with the Memorial Drive Alliance and have shared insights with the Cambridge Bicycle Safety group about how they can work with local businesses to receive community input, build consensus, and reduce hostilities between cyclists and non-cyclists. As a city councillor, I will take my experience and these initiatives with me to the table and make them a major order of business.

Quinton Zondervan

Thanks in part to my advocacy and leadership, Cambridge will be lowering speed limits on most side streets to 20 MPH. All remaining streets controlled by the city are already at 25 MPH. Also mentioned earlier is the bike safety ordinance, first in the nation, which I helped move through the council. I’m constantly pushing for traffic calming, lane reductions and other measures that will slow down vehicular traffic and improve safety. Along with Councillor Devereux, I’m part of a coalition of local organizations advocating with DCR to reduce vehicular lanes on Memorial Drive, and reclaim the space for pedestrian and bicycle modes, as well as for tree canopy expansion. I recently met with neighbors who want to turn their street into a neighborway, and I’m helping them navigate their project through the bureaucracy; I’ve already gotten the city to commit to adding this street to their road improvement plan. Ultimately I want to see car free zones in all major squares in Cambridge: Kendall, Central, Harvard, Porter (and Davis in Somerville).

I’ve called for free public transit buses in Cambridge, owned and operated by the city. If Harvard and MIT can operate private shuttles, why can’t we operate public ones to help people get around? I’ve called for free MBTA passes for all public school students, and i’ve said that the T should be free for all riders. I’ve advocated with the MBTA to improve maintenance on its stations and trains in Cambridge. I’m calling for equitable congestion pricing (low income drivers wouldn’t pay) on our highways so that we can generate additional revenues for public transit. We should have congestion pricing surcharges on Uber/Lyft rides in and out of Cambridge (Cambridge resident Uber/Lyft drivers would be exempt), with the money going to public transit. I will continue to advocate with the state to lift their absurd austerity measures imposed on the MBTA and properly fund our public transit infrastructure so it can service our residents.

As mentioned I helped shepherd the bike safety ordinance, but even that won’t move fast enough. In addition I’m calling for more “quick-build” projects like we’ve done on Cambridge St., South Mass. Ave. and Porter Sq. among others. The city has done far too few of these projects, and we continue to lose friends and neighbors to vehicular traffic. We have seen progress when we’ve really pushed, including in Porter Square where the staff had no plans to install protected lanes until strong community (and council) pushback; now they will begin a design with protected lanes next year. We’ve had two pedestrian fatalities and one bicycle fatality in the last 2 years in Cambridge, and that rate is unacceptable. We need to expect more of our City Manager on this front: the quick build projects simply aren’t coming fast enough. We are a wealthy city with vast resources; there is no need to wait for mitigation money from development to move ahead with projects that provide basic safety to residents.

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Additional Questions

Click on the categories below for the complete question asked. Click on any answer with a * for further explanation of the candidate's stance.

Do you support:

1. Vision Zero

1. Vision Zero is an approach which aims to eliminate traffic fatalities and serious injuries and has been adopted by Boston, Cambridge, and Somerville, and many other cities across the country. Do you support the principles of Vision Zero policies and funding for their rapid implementation?

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2. State law allowing automated enforcement

2. One key strategy that has been proven to effectively reduce speeding, improve safety, and remove racial bias in traffic enforcement in other states and countries is automated enforcement (i.e. speed cameras and red light cameras). Do you support S.1376, An Act relative to automated enforcement, which if passed would authorize cities and towns in Massachusetts to opt into the use of automated enforcement? To see the full text of the bill, visit malegislature.gov/Bills/191/S1376

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3. Bike Network Plan

3. Do you support the implementation of improved bike facilities identified in your community’s Bike Network Plan or do you support the creation of a Bike Network Plan if none already exists?

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4. Age-friendly walking conditions

4. Do you support creating age-friendly walking conditions in your community -- an issue raised by many seniors as critical to their ability to 'age in community'? If yes, how?

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(more below)

Burhan Azeem

Strongly Support

Strongly Support

Strongly Support*

Burhan Azeem

I would go further and push for protected bike lanes to then be converted to bike paths.

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Strongly Support

 

Dennis Carlone

Strongly Support

Strongly Support

Strongly Support

Strongly Support*


Dennis Carlone

Sidewalk improvements, crosswalks that allow a longer crossing time and pedestrian-controlled traffic lights, further reducing speeds and decreasing traffic especially at peak hours, and adding car-free zones to ensure seniors can cross any street.

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Charles Franklin

Strongly Support*

Charles Franklin

Absolutely. We must continually strive to decrease traffic fatalities. I know we can do better. Many European countries already have two to four times less accidents than we do. According to the World Health Organization, 27% of worldwide traffic fatalities in 2013 where pedestrians and cyclists. We cannot accept that, so we must and can do better.

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Strongly Oppose*

Charles Franklin

I am absolutely in favor of stricter enforcement of traffic laws. However, I have strong privacy concerns with speed and red light cameras. In particular, I don’t like giving computers the power to issue citations. I say this as a black man and software engineer.

Computerized ticketing introduces its own set of biases, and does not preclude others, particularly racial biases from appearing in other parts of the ticketing process [e.g appeals].

I’m also not convinced that red-light cameras necessarily increase safety. I’ve read a number of papers that make the opposite claim.

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Strongly Support*

Charles Franklin

I spoke in support of the plan before the city council when it was approved. For even faster rollout, there are many streets with no parking where bike lanes could be protected with trivial effort by putting up pylons until the city is ready to build something more substantial. There is substantial inertia in the city to getting proper protected bike lanes built. The sooner we build protected bike lanes, the more we will encourage cycling and save lives in Cambridge.

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Strongly Support*

Charles Franklin

Yes. I think our infrastructure is hostile to the elderly.
The timing on some lights is too short for those with mobility issues to safely cross in time. Inman Square timings put pedestrians in the path of cars just as the lights change.
Audible cross signals can be louder. I've heard that they are not as loud as they were before, and are now hard to hear over the traffic. This is bad for those who are hearing or vision-impaired.
On-street parking can make it hard to see oncoming car and bicycle traffic. We can improve line-of-site to make them safer to cross.
More traffic monitors can help.

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Craig Kelley

Strongly Support*

Craig Kelley

Vision Zero has a wide variety of actions steps such as enforcement, special slow speed zones, equity and enhanced intersection safety that make a huge amount of sense and that I enthusiastically support, to include increased funding and accountability to help ensure their rapid implementation.

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Strongly Support*

Craig Kelley

Red-light cameras are one more tool Cambridge, and other municipalities, should be able to access to improve street safety. Their use must be coordinated with the City’s ground-breaking surveillance ordinance and be managed in such a way as to protect privacy and prevent the abuse of data. There is some evidence that, in some places, red light cameras do not provide the hoped for benefits but, as with other street safety programs, this is not a ‘one size fits all’ idea and the City should be able to decide where such cameras would provide a positive safety outcome.

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Neither Support nor Oppose*

Craig Kelley

Quick-build infrastructure can make a lot of sense at times, provided that the City has an appropriate, publicly known way of both outreach about the new layouts and assessing whether the layouts increase safety or not. With the right process and supervision, we can install facilities, see how they work, remove what doesn’t work and expand what does. We need to understand that the term “bike lane” is getting more obsolete every day and whatever we build, quick or otherwise, must reflect today’s increasingly varied non-car transportation options and be flexible enough to meet tomorrow’s needs.

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Strongly Support*

Craig Kelley

We need to make sure that sidewalks are made for and used only by pedestrians in any area that sees much sidewalk use at all. That means keeping bikes and scooters and skateboards off our most crowded sidewalks in Harvard Square and Porter Square, stopping our approval of sidewalk-blocking A-frame signs, working with stores to manage the lines that clog sidewalk passage and doing a better job of snow and ice removal. We should also ask our PCOs to report sidewalk defects and put more effort into rapid and effective responses to See/Click/Fix sidewalk issue reports.

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Derek Kopon

Strongly Support*

Derek Kopon

Yes, with emphasis on the words "rapid implementation." Many cyclists, including myself, feel that progress has been made, but continues to move too slowly.

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Somewhat Support*

Derek Kopon

I support passage of the bill in order to give cities and towns freedom to implement this measure if they choose. However, I am a privacy advocate and am generally uncomfortable with widespread proliferation of video cameras in public places. I would first want to consider infrastructure and traffic calming techniques to reduce speeding. If these are not sufficient, then I would support automated enforcement on major thoroughfares away from residential neighborhoods only.

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Strongly Support*

Derek Kopon

Yes, with emphasis on the words "rapid" and "protected."

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Strongly Support*

Derek Kopon

As I mentioned in my answer to an earlier question, I believe there are still many crosswalks near residential neighborhoods in need of traffic calming measures. These can take the form of curb extensions, raised crosswalks, narrowing of traffic lanes, inclusion of bike lanes, clear signage indicating an upcoming crosswalk, etc.

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Alanna Mallon

Strongly Support

Strongly Oppose*

Alanna Mallon

Replacing police officers with cameras doesn't eliminate racial bias, and we should be doing the hard but necessary work of anti-bias training in all departments in our City, including on our police force. Additionally, our police force has a strong emphasis on community policing that should be encouraged, not replaced with cameras, which would be a temporary band aid on a systemic problem. I would also add that given the troubling direction of our country, we do not want to add more cameras to our streets which are collecting more information about people and their movements.

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Strongly Support

Strongly Support*

Alanna Mallon

I am often out in our community with our seniors through my food home delivery program, and through my visits to both Millers River and Manning Apartments. I facilitated communication between Cambridge Bike Safety and the CHA to ensure that both the renovation of Millers River Apartments and completion of the Grand Junction move forward. I also make trips to residents’ homes to ensure the safe removal of barriers to sidewalk access, such as obstructive tree roots or cracked concrete.

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Marc McGovern

Strongly Support*

Marc McGovern

Vision Zero cannot just be a policy that gathers dust on a self. It must be enacted and enacted quickly.

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Somewhat Support*

Marc McGovern

Although I see the value of cameras as a way to improve safety, I worry about civil liberties and any data collected being used to target certain individuals. I would want to be sure how data was being used, how long it was being stored for and who had access to that data.

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Strongly Support*

Marc McGovern

Yes and I have supported these projects.

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Strongly Support*

Marc McGovern

One complaint I often hear from seniors has to do with the poor conditions of our sidewalks. Although Cambridge has a 5 year plan to address sidewalk reconstruction, there are many sidewalks not on that list. We must move forward with our 5 year plan, but not neglect the immediate need. We also need to ensure that street markings and pavings are updated and clear.

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Jeffery McNary

Somewhat Support

Somewhat Support

Strongly Support

Strongly Support*

Jeffery McNary

strict enforcement of current regs

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Adriane Musgrave

Strongly Support

Somewhat Oppose*

Adriane Musgrave

The ACLU has long opposed red light cameras due to concerns related to public safety, due process, and privacy. Stated concerns in MA can be found here: https://privacysos.org/redlight/

And relevant concerns from the RI ACLU can be found here

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Strongly Support

Strongly Support*

Adriane Musgrave

One of the simplest ways we can increase our seniors' quality of life is by installing more benches. In North Cambridge, for example, I've repeatedly heard this request. Currently we only have two benches per side for the entire stretch of Mass. Ave from Porter Square to Route 16.

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Patty Nolan

Strongly Support*

Patty Nolan

As a volunteer board member of Green Street Initiative and supporter of many initiatives in the schools to get not only students but staff to use their cars less often, I know that with concerted effort we can change behavior. People need to feel comfortable and safe. And they sometimes need to be encourage to try something new - the whole premise of GSI WalkRide Days is that, and it has been very effective at getting many people to actually change behavior. Vision Zero is possible!

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Strongly Support*

Patty Nolan

I support this bill, especially since people I support and know - Reps. Jon Hecht, Mike Connolly and Sen. Brownberger are lead sponsors. However, I do want to note that I am worried about the surveillance state and the loss of civil liberties in too many areas of life. While this bill does not lead to that, we all must be aware of the potential for date to be misused by the government.

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Strongly Support*

Patty Nolan

The pilots in Cambridge should be implemented long enough to gather data on how to do it well. The map in the plan should be treated as a plan - which means it should have timelines and specific goals for implementation.

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Strongly Support*

Patty Nolan

Cambridge has amazing programs for seniors, and is a remarkable city for growing old, in terms of city program. However, many seniors do worry about walking conditions. This area is one where we can and should do better.

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John Pitkin

Somewhat Support

Strongly Support

Neither Support nor Oppose

Strongly Support*


John Pitkin

Smoother sidewalks, fewer bricks, criminal prosecution of cyclists who recklessly collide with a pedestrian. The last would help raise awareness and change the culture. My wife, age 75, is terrified of cyclists.

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Sumbul Siddiqui

Strongly Support

Strongly Support*


Sumbul Siddiqui

I support as long as it meets the intended goals and is not used for surveillance, and I believe any locations for automated enforcement must be approved through a very public process.

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Strongly Support*


Sumbul Siddiqui

Yes, and community input and residents’ concerns must be taken into consideration so that plans can be implemented as efficiently as possible.

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Strongly Support*


Sumbul Siddiqui

Promoting walkability and accessibility is essential for our seniors. I’ve worked with the City Manager to install benches near MBTA stops (Windsor and Cambridge Street), and near Porter Square. I’ve also brought to the City Manager’s attention dangerous sidewalks that aren’t in the sidewalk reconstruction plan that need to be looked at.

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E. Denise Simmons

Strongly Support

Strongly Support

Strongly Support*


E. Denise Simmons

Again, I support this but I am adamant that we marry "rapid construction" with "smart implementation." To the extent that these ideals are both taken in equal measure, I fully support this.

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Strongly Support*


E. Denise Simmons

We need a public awareness campaign for all who use our public ways - no one's safety can be placed above anyone else's. Bicyclists have a right to expect safe road conditions, as do pedestrians, as do seniors and those with mobility issues, as do motorists. We must all share this space, and the City needs to be more aggressive in raising awareness of the importance of being mindful of all others on these public spaces.

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Ben Simon

Strongly Support

Somewhat Support*


Ben Simon

I strongly support reducing fatalities, but I'm also concerned with putting too many surveillance tools in the hands of a state that we know uses this technology unethically and has been proven to lie to the public about its use of it as well. I'd like to learn more about how these cameras would work, what images exactly they would capture, and to what extent we could ensure they would not be used for any unethical purpose by state intelligence or private intelligence actors. Not to beat a dead horse, but people won't be able to drive unsafely when no one is driving!

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Strongly Support

Strongly Support*


Ben Simon

We need to start making sure that our sidewalks are for walking! Not cycling and especially not for riding those horrible motor scooters which could easily kill someone. I think we can encourage this by both having some kind legal disincentive for those that break this law but also create safer road conditions for cycling, skating, etc. which will hopefully mean fewer people will ride on the sidewalk.

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Jivan Sobrinho-Wheeler

Strongly Support

Strongly Support

Strongly Support*


Jivan Sobrinho-Wheeler

Yes, and the City must add quick-build protected bike lanes as soon as possible along the entirety of major streets like Hampshire, Broadway, Cambridge, and Mass Ave.

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Strongly Support*


Jivan Sobrinho-Wheeler

Cambridge recently experienced a car-related fatality with a senior pedestrian. Walkability and traffic calming are critical for safety and quality of life for seniors, people with disabilities, and residents who can’t afford a car in our city. Our safe streets efforts should include infrastructure improvements and municipal sidewalk snow removal. Seniors, people with disabilities, and others who are likely to be particularly vulnerable as pedestrians should be deeply involved in safe-streets redesigns.

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Nicola Williams

Strongly Support

Strongly Support

Strongly Support

Strongly Support*


Nicola Williams

We need to start thinking about how our city can invest in universal design to not only help seniors feel comfortable and capable of moving through their community, but people with disabilities. We could implement a disparity study of our streets, which would be deemed difficult to traverse or inaccessible to these communities, look for green solutions around these issues, and set goals based on the report.

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Quinton Zondervan

Strongly Support

Strongly Support

Strongly Support

Strongly Support*


Quinton Zondervan

More traffic calming measures, on demand light controlled crosswalks, road diets, sidewalk improvements, neighborways and car free zones, among others. I met with a senior who lives in public housing on Memorial Drive who told me that pedestrian conditions are so bad that those with disabilities must go a different way to the more expensive grocery store (Whole Foods) rather than the shorter walk to the more affordable store (Trader Joes). This is unacceptable and I am fighting for improvements as part of the upcoming Mem Drive redesign.

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Do you support:

5. Restriction of parking for bus-only lanes

5. Do you support the restriction of on-street parking during rush hour in order to create dedicated bus lanes on certain major thoroughfares where bus riders experience significant delays due to traffic congestion?

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6. New revenue sources

6. Do you support exploring new ways of raising revenue to provide Boston with more tools to improve conditions for people walking, using mobility assistive devices, biking, and using public transit (e.g. increasing the gas tax, implementing congestion pricing, increasing fees on Uber/Lyft)? If yes, please give examples that interest you.

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7. Dynamic parking meter pricing

7. Do you support the rollout of dynamic parking meter pricing in business districts, which would increase meter rates during periods of increased demand, to free up on-street parking and reduce cars "cruising" for open spaces?

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8. Raising the fee for residential parking permits

8. Do you support raising the annual fee for residential parking permits?

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(more below)

Burhan Azeem

Somewhat Support

Strongly Support

Strongly Support

Strongly Support

 

Dennis Carlone

Strongly Support

Strongly Support*


Dennis Carlone

Increasing Lyft/Uber fees, increasing the gas tax, adding congestion pricing - but ensuring these taxes only apply to those who can afford them. I want to ensure we raise revenue via these measures but not disproportionately affect low income and working-poor residents.

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Strongly Support

Strongly Support

 

Charles Franklin

Somewhat Support*

Charles Franklin

Yes, as long as we pick the right streets to apply this to.There are many streets where this would work well. Mt. Auburn St. now has a fairly long dedicated bus lane that in my view has been a success.

My hometown D.C. has rules that disallow parking during rush hour, similar to those on Memorial Drive by Harvard. It largely works, but can be confusing when not done with care.

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Strongly Support*

Charles Franklin

We absolutely need to explore finding new ways to fund and encourage sustainable and accessible modes of transportation. I’m a strong believer in taxing behaviors that cause significant negative externalities. Uber and Lyft are a good example. There is a state fee for this that goes towards supporting the taxi industry. I’d like to see it used to support alternative transportation. I'm also in favor of raising the excise tax on cars.

I am wary of increasing the cost of any particular mode of transportation without mitigating the possible effects on working and low-income families.

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Somewhat Support*

Charles Franklin

I am in favor of this, so long as it actually frees up on-street parking and reduces “cruising” as a result. We would have to tweak the price changes so as to have the desired effect. I don’t want to see the city implement such a scheme with little or no effect on on-street parking.
Another side-effect I’m concerned about is that dynamic meter pricing may push people to shop larger businesses with large parking lots and hurt our local businesses. We should study how to mitigate these effects before putting such a plan into action.

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Somewhat Support*

Charles Franklin

Yes, but we have to do it carefully. If we don’t raise the annual fee enough much, then the price will not have the desired effect on reducing parking use. If we raise it too high, it may place a significant burden on low-income households that rely on their car for work, etc.

On the other hand, raising the annual fee may not have much of an effect on reducing parking use. My understanding is that the city issues less permits every year.

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Craig Kelley

Somewhat Support*

Craig Kelley

Where the creation of these lanes would not be dangerous, it makes sense to me. In fairness to businesses and clients who might be impacted by these new restrictions, we should review nearby onstreet parking on side streets so that the Mom taking her young kids to the dentist for a 7:30 AM appointment before work can still get there. While parking spaces should not dictate our traffic and development programs, we cannot operate as if parking is a resource that has become irrelevant, a fact that is reflected in all of the parking spaces reserved specifically for City staff and City Councilors.

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Strongly Support*

Craig Kelley

While I strongly support congestion pricing, an increased gas tax, higher parking sticker fees and, especially, an increase in TNC ride pickup fees, the City does not need to raise fees in order to spend more money on its transportation safety programs. We have plenty of money for enhanced traffic enforcement efforts, more effective safety education outreach, improved street maintenance and more, we’re just choosing not to currently spend it. We should also charge delivery vehicles like UPS for curb access, as that regularly blocks both our streets and sidewalks.

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Strongly Support*

Craig Kelley

Parking as a resource must be better managed, including better pricing and replacing on-street car parking with suitable bike and ‘bike like’ parking such as scooters and motorcycles to help free up sidewalks for pedestrians. The absolute dominance of cars is changing but the City needs to do a much, much, better job of understanding this change and helping our business and other communities understand, based on data not anecdotes, how we can most successfully move into a less car-dependent future. Simply telling a business owner that things will be okay when parking is removed is not enough.

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Strongly Support*

Craig Kelley

My wife and I have not owned a car for over a decade and every year my family has subsidized parking stickers for people who do own cars because the program does not charge enough for stickers to even cover its operating cost. That is absolutely crazy and unfair. The City should, at minimum, at least charge enough for parking stickers to cover the cost of the program.

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Derek Kopon

Strongly Support

Strongly Support*

Derek Kopon

If there is a way to effectively implement congestion pricing, then I think that would be appropriate. While I do support increasing the gas tax, any significant increase in the gas tax probably must be a statewide effort. If we only increase a gas tax here in Cambridge, this is simply an arbitrage opportunity and a boon to gas stations in Somerville.

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Strongly Support*

Derek Kopon

Yes, a dynamic pricing model can be tuned to achieve a certain desired vacancy on-street parking percentage. This is a boon to local business as well, as it makes it easier for people to park if they know there is a good chance to find on-street parking, even if they have to pay a little bit more for it.

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Somewhat Support*

Derek Kopon

I support a gradual increase in the residential parking permit as street space is a valuable and scarce resource that should be priced accordingly. However, we also must be mindful that, as much as we love our bikes, some members of our community such as the elderly, those with disabilities, families with small children, etc. will require a car to get around. I favor a two-tiered parking permit pricing model with lower fees for residents who are driving hybrid or electric vehicles and higher fees for those driving less fuel-efficient cars.

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Alanna Mallon

Strongly Support

Strongly Support*

Alanna Mallon

I support a variety of new ways to raise revenue for public transit, including congestion prices and extra fees on ridehailing services.

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Somewhat Oppose*

Alanna Mallon

Our small businesses are already struggling in a difficult retail environment, and their employees - who are often from out of town, as they cannot afford to live in Cambridge - are already the ones who are most struggling with being able to commute to work and park. Discouraging potential customers from parking near local businesses by raising prices will only cause those customers to frequent large chain stores with plenty of (free) parking instead, hurting our small business owners.

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Somewhat Oppose*

Alanna Mallon

Raising the fees for parking permits will not actually change anyone’s behavior or discourage residents from owning cars. This will only hurt lower income people as another instance of being burdened by unnecessary fees, and those who would be able to absorb a parking fee increase likely have private driveways anyway. I would be in support of a tiered fee structure, which would keep parking fees stable but charge more for each car owned/permitted.

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Marc McGovern

Strongly Support*

Marc McGovern

We have to make public transit more efficient if we want people to use it. I think the least we can do is restrict on-street parking during rush hour along our major corridors.

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Strongly Support*

Marc McGovern

Although I don't think revenue is our biggest problem, I think we need to look at various ways to raise additional funds, not just in Cambridge but as a State. I supported the gas tax and think it is a fair way to raise money to address various transportation issues. I have also been outspoken about the need to invest significant dollars to improve our public transit system and to think regionally. I support high speed rail, and the North-South Connector.

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Strongly Support

Somewhat Support*

Marc McGovern

Although I believe that $25 for the year is way too low for most people, I would want to ensure that there are measures in place to support our seniors and low income residents.

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Jeffery McNary

Strongly Support

Strongly Support*


Jeffery McNary

gas tax

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Somewhat Support

Somewhat Oppose

 

Adriane Musgrave

Strongly Support

Strongly Support*

Adriane Musgrave

As part of the #UnfairHikes rally, I supported several options to raise revenue, including increasing the gas tax by 3 cent per gallon, adopting congestion pricing on major roadways, and increasing the fees on Uber/Lyft. I would be open to considering other proposals as well.

In Cambridge, I don't think that revenue is the main barrier to getting more protective bike lanes built or creating safer crosswalks. Though if I find that it is, I would also be open to other revenue-generating options.

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Strongly Support

Strongly Support

 

Patty Nolan

Strongly Support*

Patty Nolan

This idea works well in parts of other cities - including nearby Boston which has a few streets so designated. Cambridge has only part of Memorial Drive and the city doesn't control that. The faster buses can move, the more people will use them - IF they are frequent enough.

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Strongly Support*

Patty Nolan

Honestly, for both providing revenue and environmental reasons, I have long advocated and supported a doubling of the gas tax - or even tripling, so it approaches Europe prices. cars would and should be smaller and more efficient if we did that. Note that is why I belong to Better World Club and NOT the AAA, since BWC lobbies for higher efficiency standards, and includes bike help along with car help if you break down on the road.

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Strongly Support*

Patty Nolan

I also support congestion pricing - for major roads like the turnpike and figuring out how to do it on major city roads into and out of Cambridge - and Boston and other cities with traffic nightmares.

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Strongly Support*

Patty Nolan

I support the fee to be doubled - AND provide an exception for low income residents.

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John Pitkin

Strongly Support

Strongly Support*


John Pitkin

Some form of congestion pricing and increased fees on Uber/Lyft, but ONLY for public transit, which should be prioritized. Once public transit becomes the norm, that will free up space on streets for other non-car modes.

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Neither Support nor Oppose*


John Pitkin

I could be persuaded to support but want to know more.

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Strongly Support

 
Sumbul Siddiqui

Somewhat Support*


Sumbul Siddiqui

Allowing for priority access for buses during rush hour would increase reliability but I think we have to work the MBTA more closely because even with dedicated bus lanes, other issues may come up. Additionally, we have some squares where on-street parking is critical for local businesses, so we must take that into account.

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Strongly Support*


Sumbul Siddiqui

Examples include requiring developers to pay into a trust designed to improve the infrastructure for pedestrians, cyclists and ride-sharing programs as part of any zoning request; Congestion pricing in certain areas of the city, such as Alewife, and adjusting the annual fee for residential parking permits to one which is based on income.

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Strongly Support*


Sumbul Siddiqui

I would want to be careful about increasing the prices during high-volume hours when lower income employees may need to drive to work, such as before and during nighttime shifts on weekends in neighborhoods with restaurants.

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Strongly Support*


Sumbul Siddiqui

As long as it is mean tested.

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E. Denise Simmons

Neither Support nor Oppose*


E. Denise Simmons

I support the concept of this, but I would need more information on how this might be implemented and what potential unintended consequences might be. I would like to explore this more, though, and would welcome being provided more information.

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Strongly Support*


E. Denise Simmons

I would be open to exploring increasing the gas tax, implementing congestion, or increasing fees on the TNCs.

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Strongly Support*


E. Denise Simmons

I am interested in exploring this further; I would want to know what impact this might have on the less affluent before I could fully embrace this. I would not wish to implement a system where very wealthy people can afford parking spaces in our most popular locations, and the less fortunate would essentially be discouraged from similar participation.

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Somewhat Support*


E. Denise Simmons

I could support this, provided that we explore carve-outs for those who meet some sort of criteria proving that they are less affluent and would be unfairly penalized. For example, if an individual were receiving SNAP benefits or lived in subsidized housing.

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Ben Simon

Strongly Support

Strongly Support*


Ben Simon

We desperately need to raise revenue but we should be doing it by taxing the rich. I am concerned that gas taxes and congestion pricing are regressive taxes and inordinately burden poor and working class people. They may need to drive because they have been displaced from their communities through gentrification and/or because our public transportation system is poor and shuts down before many working class people are done with work, such as people who work in bars.

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Neither Support nor Oppose*


Ben Simon

I have a less strong take on this as I'm not as clear on how exactly it would work, but I am concerned that it may be regressive for the same reasons I listed in question 6 above.

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Neither Support nor Oppose*


Ben Simon

See explanation for question 6

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Jivan Sobrinho-Wheeler

Strongly Support*


Jivan Sobrinho-Wheeler

Yes, as traffic studies have made clear, there are some streets where the majority of rush hour commuters are travelling by bus, but those buses often get delayed in traffic. Bus-only lanes will encourage more people to take public transit by reducing the amount of time buses are stuck in traffic and improving commute times.

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Strongly Support*


Jivan Sobrinho-Wheeler

Yes, congestion pricing, especially in the most traffic-heavy areas of the city, is a great way to reduce traffic and generate revenue to improve public transit and mobility. Fees for parking and on Uber and Lyft are another way to both generate revenue for public transit and encourage people to take it. I also believe we should design these revenue generation opportunities to be progressive. We have the data on cars on drivers to ensure wealthier drivers are paying more in congestion-pricing than poor drivers to make the system fair.

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Strongly Support

Strongly Support*


Jivan Sobrinho-Wheeler

Yes, and the annual fee for residential parking permits should be progressive, with well-off residents paying more for parking permits than lower-income Cantabrigians. As an example, a BMW owner should probably pay more for a permit than the owner of an old Dodge Dart.

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Nicola Williams

Strongly Support

Strongly Support*


Nicola Williams

I am interested in the proposal by Winthrop Senator Joe Boncore and Brighton Rep. Michael Moran to tax ride-sharing companies for distances their vehicles travel without passengers. Their bill would specifically prohibit companies like Uber and Lyft from charging drivers or riders for these increased prices. I'd like to support these efforts as a city councillor.

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Strongly Support

Somewhat Support

 
Quinton Zondervan

Strongly Support

Strongly Support*


Quinton Zondervan

I’m interested in all of the above as explained earlier. I’m also a proponent of equitably increasing the gas tax at the state level and I’ve been working on an equitable carbon tax for the past 6 years through the Climate Action Business Association (CABA, now part of Climate XChange), which I co-founded to take action on climate change and to help transform our transportation sector to more sustainable transit modes.

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Strongly Support

Strongly Support*


Quinton Zondervan

I strongly advocated for this, successfully about 10 years ago, less successfully last year on the council. But I will continue to push for this.

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Do you support:

9. Eliminating parking requirements for developments

9. Do you support eliminating requirements for a minimum number of parking spaces for new development?

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10. Reducing/ eliminating MBTA fares

10. Do you support reducing or eliminating MBTA fares for people with low income?

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Burhan Azeem

Strongly Support

Strongly Support

     

Dennis Carlone

Strongly Support*


Dennis Carlone

I am 100% in support of this.

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Strongly Support*


Dennis Carlone

Transit should be free and accessible for all.

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Charles Franklin

Strongly Support*

Charles Franklin

Absolutely. Having this requirement encourages people to bring their cars when they move to the city. Which is to say nothing about the difficulties it poses to building new housing to ease the pressure on our housing market. It is also my understanding that many of the spaces associated with new development are going unused. These spaces could be put to better use as housing or as green space.

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Strongly Support*

Charles Franklin

I think public transportation should be free for everyone. Short of that, we should reduce or eliminate fares for low income families. I am in favor of putting pressure on the MBTA to do so, and if that doesn’t work, having the city provide funds to subsidize fares for those who need them most.

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Craig Kelley

Somewhat Support*

Craig Kelley

An absolute elimination of required parking spaces for new development may have the unintended consequence of making those buildings less accessible for people with mobility challenges, perhaps even to the extent of violating the ADA. With the caveat that enough spaces be required to meet the needs of people with various mobility constraints, I favor eliminating parking requirements. As our shared transportation economy expands, in part because of zoning I have introduced (hopefully it will pass), personal cars will become less of a thing and we should start planning for that future now.

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Strongly Support*

Craig Kelley

Equity in transportation, to include both physical and economic access, is crucial to an equitable society. I can't say what the exact pricing formula should be or exactly what types of transportation subsidies should be provided to low income residents (for example, many low income workers commute at least one way at times when the T is not running so a TNC subsidy may be relevant for them), but helping ensure transportation costs do not keep people from participating in all that our region has to offer seems fair, though finding the funding streams for the subsidies will be complicated.

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Derek Kopon

Somewhat Oppose*

Derek Kopon

While I sympathize with the ethos behind this suggestion (and I do not own a car myself), the reality is that a certain percentage of residents in our community need a car to get around (the elderly, those with disabilities, families with small children, etc.). If we don't build parking in new developments, these people will park on the street and this will make it harder to put in more bike lanes. I also note that many real estate developers champion getting rid of minimum parking requirements in order to increase their profit margins. I prefer that we do not cut corners on development.

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Strongly Support

     

Alanna Mallon

Somewhat Support*


Alanna Mallon

Most parking spaces in new developments go unused, but we still must be ADA compliant and aware of the transit amenities, or lack thereof, around each project

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Strongly Support*


Alanna Mallon

Raise taxes. Make the T free.

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Marc McGovern

Strongly Support*


Marc McGovern

A recent study showed that 30% of the required parking spaces in new developments go unused. We see that in the parking garages in many developments in Cambridge. By eliminating parking requirements we can not only cut down on cost (money that I would want to see redirected to more affordable housing) but we would decrease car ownership, particularly in developments near public transit.

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Strongly Support*


Marc McGovern

I worked on this issue as it pertains to low income students at Cambridge Rindge and Latin School.

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Jeffery McNary

Somewhat Support

Strongly Support

     

Adriane Musgrave

Strongly Support

Strongly Support

     

Patty Nolan

Somewhat Support*

Patty Nolan

I support a reduction - However, honestly, I am not sure if it should be completely eliminated for ALL developments. . It depends on the development - whether it is for low income residents, and whether it is near enough to public transit.

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Strongly Support*

Patty Nolan

While I am not sure I support completely free MBTA for all, I support a reduction for all, and elimination or drastic reduction for all students. We subsidize roads for cars by devoting a large amount of dollars maintaining roads used mostly by private vehicles - we should subsidize public transit even more, since it is healthier AND better to address the climate crisis.

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John Pitkin

Somewhat Oppose*


John Pitkin

Reduce, yes, eliminate, no.

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Somewhat Oppose*


John Pitkin

This would be difficult to administer. Let's just keep fares low for everyone.

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Sumbul Siddiqui

Somewhat Support

Strongly Support

     
E. Denise Simmons

Strongly Support

Strongly Support

     
Ben Simon

Strongly Oppose*


Ben Simon

I am committed to a car-free future, I am also passionate about fighting gentrification and displacement. I was priced out of Cambridge as a kid when my family was evicted from our home of almost thirty years so a developer could turn it into luxury apartments. Parking requirements are sometimes a means of holding back horrible developments that would otherwise be built and displace who knows how many hundreds of people. The Sullivan Courthouse is an excellent example of just that. It would have already been privatized and turned into a luxury office tower were it not for parking requirements.

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Strongly Support*


Ben Simon

I think the T should be free for everyone.

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Jivan Sobrinho-Wheeler

Strongly Support*


Jivan Sobrinho-Wheeler

Yes, as a recent MAPC study made clear, many parking spots in developments aren’t even being used, and we shouldn’t be requiring their creation as a city. The average cost to build a parking spot is $15,000 and much of the money and space used in their creation could be going towards affordable housing or green space instead.

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Strongly Support*


Jivan Sobrinho-Wheeler

Yes, and our campaign supports eliminating fares for ALL people. Public transit is a public good like public libraries and public schools, and it should be available for all residents for free at the point of service. We’ll be releasing a policy paper on the costs of making public transit free for Cambridge residents, how the program will work, and how the City can pay for it in the coming weeks. Cambridge has the means to lead a movement for public transit among US cities—we just need the political will to make it happen.

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Nicola Williams

Strongly Support*


Nicola Williams

I support the reduction of this number rather than the elimination of any parking. We shouldn't spend money on cars that don't exist and incentivize people that don't need them to buy them.

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Strongly Support

     
Quinton Zondervan

Strongly Support*


Quinton Zondervan

I'm consistently pushing for the elimination of parking minimums and I seem to be making some headway on this with staff.

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Strongly Support*


Quinton Zondervan

Yes, in fact I think MBTA bus and subway rides should be free for all riders, paid for through taxes and fees as per previous answers.

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Top

About the Candidate

1. How do you move around your community and get to where you need to go?
Burhan Azeem
My primary mode of transportation is my bike which I take to work and errands. I also walk and take public transit daily.
Dennis Carlone
I am multi-modal. I have a car which I use when I have back to back meeting across Cambridge but I walk and take the train where I can.
Charles Franklin
I walk most places, including to work. I use public transportation for further distances. I have a car, but I try to use it as infrequently as possible, and this summer has mostly been for picking up plants, dirt, and mulch (I probably fill my tank once a month at most.) I used to bike as well as use a motor scooter (Vespa), but I had a few close calls and a couple of accidents. One of them I was lucky to walk away from. I had been avoiding biking for the past year, but have recently revived my BlueBikes membership. I still won’t bike on most streets.
Craig Kelley
I bike virtually everywhere I go in the local area, as do my wife, Hope, and two boys when they are home from college. For longer local trips we use the MBTA and rent or borrow cars to go camping or visit our boys at college. For trips to NYC, we take a bus from Alewife. We reflect what the future of urban mobility should be- we use a personal vehicle only when other transportation won’t work. Our family-wide focus on bicycling is unexcelled by any family in Cambridge, though as Hope and I get older, we become increasingly worried about the dangers posed by other cyclists as well as drivers.
Derek Kopon
I do not own a car. I mainly bike, walk, and take the T. If I am going somewhere not accessible by public transit, I take an Uber pool or Lyft line.
Alanna Mallon
I live near Central Square, so I primarily walk to work and meetings. I am an MBTA rider when I occasionally travel to Boston, and an occasional driver as well.
Marc McGovern
Mostly walking, driving or public transit
Jeffery McNary
i walk and talk
Adriane Musgrave
For nearly 15 years, I have primarily traveled around town by bike and T. For various jobs in Boston I have often commuted down Beacon/Hampshire Street, Mass Ave, and along Memorial Drive before crossing the river. As I’ve been working more in Cambridge, I’ve been biking on all of our streets – major and minor. I also walk a lot since I can meet people in my neighborhood. I frequently use the Red line (via the Davis T stop) as well as buses (the 77 and 83, mostly). We own a car so I also drive occasionally.
Patty Nolan
I usually use my city bike – an upright somewhat heavier bike for urban riding. I also have a road bike, and if I am going more than about 5 miles one way, I will more likely take that since my city bike is slow. I do pay attention to having a place to lock that bike and won’t leave it overnight in town, even locked. I occasionally use BlueBikes (am a member). If meetings are accessible to the T, I use the subway and also use MBTA buses. We also own a car and I use that, for example to visit my in-laws, but not usually around town who live in a place challenging to access by public transit
John Pitkin
On foot and MBTA.
Sumbul Siddiqui
I usually walk, ride the bus or use the T. If I have back to back meetings, I will drive ( I don’t own a car but use my parents if I need to). I broke my ankle in early 2018 and as a result, I had to use uber and also had to rely on my car. I love walking around Cambridge and try to do that as much as possible.
E. Denise Simmons
Depending upon the day, the schedule, and the need, I either walk, drive, or take public transportation.
Ben Simon
I take the MBTA, bike or walk.
Jivan Sobrinho-Wheeler
I bike and walk to work near Harvard Sq and to my partner’s apartment in Inman most days, both of which can be dangerous places for pedestrians and cyclists. I also often take the bus and subway to get meetings. Some sidewalks during my commute are covered with snow & ice in winter because Cambridge currently relies on property owners instead of having municipal snow removal like we do for the parts of the street that cars drive on. And last year I lost part of two teeth in a bike crash with a car in Cambridge, so the need for better pedestrian and bike infrastructure is personal for me.
Nicola Williams
I walk most of the time, take the bus, or the T. I also carpool as much as possible, depending upon the task.
Quinton Zondervan
Depending on distance and timing I walk, bike, use public transportation, or drive my electric car. I have been a bicycle commuter for most of my life, and that is my preferred mode of transit, but as I am still recovering from a hip replacement, currently I can only commute by bike a few days per week.
2. What is a particularly dangerous problem or location in your community for people walking, biking, taking transit, or for people with disabilities that you’d like to see addressed?
Burhan Azeem
Bike safety is huge. On my way 30 minute commute to work, I often feel my life is in danger.
Dennis Carlone
Inman Square and Porter Square are just a few of the dangerous intersections in the city. I have worked to decrease speed limits to 20MPH (we had most local streets declared safe zones) but we need to do more to ensure cyclist and pedestrian safety. We also need to add speed deterrents on through streets in residential areas: the streets parallel to Mass Ave in Cambridgeport are dangerous due to oversized, speeding vehicles. The crossing at Mass Ave and Garfield Street is unsafe for crossing especially at peak traffic periods. It should be replaced with a pedestrian controlled traffic light
Charles Franklin
Recently, the city declined to build a bike lane on Webster Ave, instead suggesting that cyclists bike down Tremont St. I live at the corner of Tremont St. and Hampshire St. and believe that intersection is treacherous, particularly when traversing Tremont. It’s a fairly blind intersection where cars crossing Hampshire St. are hard to see. It can be risky even for pedestrians. I’d like to see a stoplight there or slight changes to increase line of sight.
Craig Kelley
A particular problem non-drivers face is the lack of common norms for safe, responsible travel. The ad hoc adherence to the law creates dangerous levels of chaos and it’s not all due to cars and trucks, though they pose particularly significant hazards. New platforms like electric skateboards, scooters and onewheels crowd our public ways with little thought about where they belong or the rules they should follow. Delivery systems like Amazon and UBER create pop-up hazards for everyone, pedestrians crossing anywhere they want and CPD’s anemic traffic enforcement efforts add to our problems.
Derek Kopon
The lack of a contiguous protected bike lane network is a major deficiency in our transportation infrastructure. Major stretches of Mass Ave still require cyclists to ride in the lane of traffic. This is very unsafe.
Alanna Mallon
Massachusetts Ave is the main transit corridor in Cambridge, but it seriously lacks safe cycling and pedestrian infrastructure, particularly near Porter Square, where it is four lanes wide. We need much better crossing light signals for pedestrians. We also need to finish our protected bike network on Webster Ave, the Hampshire and Beacon Street connector, and on Garden St.
Marc McGovern
We have some very dangerous intersections in our city. That is why I filed a policy order back in 2014 that lead to the redesign of Inman Sq. That intersection is dangerous for everyone. Another intersection that is problematic is right out in front of City Hall. I have seen near misses on many occasions with cars turning left from Inman St. to Mass Ave., at the same time as cyclists are coming down Mass. Ave.
Jeffery McNary
alcohol induced travel
Adriane Musgrave
Cambridge is a dense, compact city that is still mostly car-centric in design so there are several areas that are unsafe to walk or ride. We need to redesign our streets for people first, including: - Mass Ave is the main artery through Cambridge. It's chaotic and dangerous. We must add protected bike lanes and enhance the crosswalks at every intersection. - Our Squares are also dangerous. Fortunately, Inman redesign has started. Porter Sq. needs more protected lanes. The center of Harvard Sq. – both inbound and outbound – has long been a challenge, but recently made worse by Uber/Lyft.
Patty Nolan
An issue close to my house in West Cambridge is traveling along Fresh Pond Parkway, since there is no good way to ride your bike or walk. The sidewalks are terrible and there is no bike lane. In general, the issue that I think is dangerous is that in many places there is not enough space for a cyclist, and a pedestrian and a car. Instead of having space allocated for each, usually only cars have designated lanes which are at least sometimes maintained, whereas in many places the sidewalks are not maintained and challenging for pedestrians and impossible for people with disabilities
John Pitkin
Inman Square. The reconfiguration now underway will make a complex intersection more hazardous by creating more than ten unregulated points of conflict between pedestrians and cyclists and a circuitous route for cyclists that will encourage risky shortcutting through the new pedestrian plaza. I would like to see this ill-advised project stopped in favor of safety improvements to the existing configuration and revival of the park in Vellucci Plaza.
Sumbul Siddiqui
Residents have reported that they feel unsafe at four lane crossings, even when flashing yellow lights are installed. Earlier this summer, a small child crossing Massachusetts Avenue at Garfield Street with his mother was nearly hit by a car that had failed to stop at the flashing yellow lights. It is clear that “Pedestrian Crossing” signs and zebra pavement markings are insufficient. To address the issue, I support strengthening pedestrian safety measures, including full traffic signals and pedestrian-activated High Intensity Activated Crosswalk signals.
E. Denise Simmons
The issue of motorists not being more mindful of opening their doors and "dooring" bicyclists continues to be an issue that we need to do a better job in spreading the word on. The City has started promoting the "Dutch Reach" method of opening doors, but we have not saturated the city with this.
Ben Simon
Motorists present a danger to pedestrians and cyclists all over Cambridge. I think Cambridge should look into adopting a ""Green Wave"" traffic system like is done in many places in Germany: auto traffic is limited to designated number of streets and banned on others except for abutters. This reduces traffic, emissions and accidents, as well as frees up many streets for safer pedestrian and cyclist transport. Also the private companies that rent bicycles and scooters particularly should be regulated and taxed to improve public transit, which is a better, more inclusive transit system.
Jivan Sobrinho-Wheeler
Porter, Harvard, and Central Squares in Cambridge are often dangerous commutes as a pedestrian or cyclist. I bike through Harvard Sq on my way to work and am worried myself a pedestrian will be hit by a distracted Uber or tour bus driver. We need protected bike lanes in all our squares and infrastructural changes like floating bus stops and traffic calming measures. In Cambridge, streets were designed before cars and driving on them is often frustrating. By making it easier to get around by public transit, bike or foot we can move towards the people-centered design our city was created for.
Nicola Williams
Central Square cross streets at Prospect Street and Mass Ave is dangerous. They need to limit the size of big rigs coming through the city, require extra mirrors for blind spots and protected bike lanes.
Quinton Zondervan
In my first term I worked on a first in the nation bike safety ordinance that commits the city to building protected bicycle infrastructure whenever a major road that is on the city’s bicycle plan undergoes major repair or redesign. I also worked on reducing speed limits to 20 MPH by declaring safety zones on almost all city side-streets, which will take effect very soon. I also regularly ask for safety improvements and protected bicycle infrastructure at specific intersections or along specific routes, including recently on Webster, River St., Broadway, Hampshire and Mass. Ave. among others.
3. Why do you think people who care about walking, biking, transit, and mobility issues should vote for you?
Burhan Azeem
I understand these issues better than anyone else because I live these issues.
Dennis Carlone
I have been working to make streets safe for pedestrians and cyclists since I was elected in 2013, and before that as a city consultant. I am passionate in my support of a greener future so I am working with my colleagues to ensure our transit system is better for both people and the environment and to create a wealth of green transportation options. The most admired cities in the world offer inviting pedestrian environments, safe biking paths for all ages and a clean and efficient transit to all neighborhoods. Cambridge has to continue moving forward.
Charles Franklin
I understand the needs of non-personal car commuters, as I am one. In the past 5 years, I’ve gotten around by walking, biking, and taking the T. As such, I have experienced the same difficulties that face those who rely on safe streets and public transit to get around. I’ve been a strong advocate for sustainable commuting, including canvassing for bicycle safety in the city. I don’t have mobility issues myself, but I have friends that do and will take their input into account to make sure they can feel safe on the streets.
Craig Kelley
People who care about walking, biking and getting around without driving should vote for me because I am living that life and have lived it, with my entire family, for decades. I know just how dangerous bicycling is, how street safety is an issue in and out of Cambridge, how complicated the right solutions are and how all of us have a responsibility to put safety first. As evidenced by the two Micromobility events I organized this term, I have the vision and the experience to help Cambridge rethink our joint mobility future in a way that goes beyond our current bike/car/pedestrian thinking.
Derek Kopon
People who care about these issues should vote for me because I place a very high priority on emissions-free transportation, both for environmental and public health reasons. If we enable people to walk or bike whenever possible, we are encouraging them to be outside, exercise, and interact more naturally with their environment. While cars are necessary some of the time, cars create traffic congestion, noise, air pollution, greenhouse gas emission, etc. Our infrastructure should be designed to enable all forms of transit, especially those modalities that are most healthful to our citizens.
Alanna Mallon
I have made improvements in our community, such as the Mass Ave, Western Ave, and Prospect St intersection in Central Square where I introduced a pedestrian super LPI to reduce conflicts with cars when crossing. I also had the City use State highway grants to increase traffic monitoring at Prospect and Broadway and Prospect and Hampshire intersections, particularly during rush hour. I also submitted a policy order to ask the City to work with MAPC to gather data about ridehail services on our streets, and establish pickup and drop off locations to minimize congestion and blocking bike lanes.
Marc McGovern
I have been a leader in addressing street safety in Cambridge. From calling for the redesign of Inman Sq., to supporting bike lanes on Cambridge St., to working with Cambridge Bike Safety and the City to author a first of it's kind ordinance to require dedicated bike lanes during major street construction. Vision Zero can't just be a plan on paper. We need to take the steps necessary to make it a reality.
Jeffery McNary
their safety and love of friends and relatives
Adriane Musgrave
People who care about walking, biking, and transit should vote for me because these are my primary modes of transportation. I live these experiences every day and have been doing so for over 15 years. I’ve experienced first-hand the three-fold increase in bike commuters as well as the degradation of our transit system. I served as a local leader during the #UnfairHikes rally to push for transit improvements and new funding streams. Plus, I'm a new mom who has just started family biking. I want to see my son exercise his independence so I want even more to make our streets safer for kids.
Patty Nolan
I use all modes of transportation–I walk, bicycle and drive. I understand living in the city requires accommodation of all modes. During my years on School Committee, I advocated for safe routes to schools, for more walking and biking and bus use for students. I bring people together and am known to be a thoughtful, respectful policymaker who listens, always looks to best practice when assessing options, and is willing to fight for change. As someone who believes that our city needs to do a better job of listening and developing better solutions, I have a track record of effective advocacy.
John Pitkin
My experience with citizen participation and oversight of municipal transportation planning and public ways, as chair of the 1973-75 Cambridge Transportation Forum and as member of the Board of Traffic and Parking (1974-93). My campaign is about bringing citizens (not corporations) to the center of the democratic process and decision-making in Cambridge. I specifically propose a new, citizen-led and staff-supported Cambridge Transportation Forum, modeled on the earlier Forum, to advise the City Council on transportation planning and policy and management of the public ways. We can do this!
Sumbul Siddiqui
During my first term, I have been a strong advocate for improving bicycle infrastructure and pedestrian safety. I co-sponsored policy orders to improve bike lane connectedness, identify traffic-calming and safety features for the Fresh Pond Mall area, and install a pedestrian Super LPI at a congested intersection. If re-elected, I will continue to advocate for pedestrian and cyclist safety.
E. Denise Simmons
I am someone who knows how to get things done on the Council, and I am someone who works to bring people together in finding common ground. Part of this is just my personal approach to problem-solving, and part of it is just down to experience and recognizing how our municipal system works.
Ben Simon
Ever since learning about global warming in the 7th grade I have passionately believed that our transit system needs to be fundamentally changed. This idea that everyone needs a car to be an independent, respectable, American adult is so steeped into our culture because of decades of marketing telling us so, but we need to break from this thinking. I hope we can look forward to a future where urban transport is centered around an excellent public transit system, walking and cycling and cars are for serving emergency and mobility needs.
Jivan Sobrinho-Wheeler
I usually walk or bike to work, and I get to volunteer work on public transit. The vast majority of our city has a similar commute—surveys show most Cantabrigians don’t commute by car—because they don't have free parking at work. But our current City Council does. We need to elect people who understand how dangerous & inefficient our streets are now. Our campaign has the ambitious goal of making buses and subways free for Cambridge residents by 2025. We also need to add miles of bus-only lanes and complete the bike network—including PBLs on all of Mass Ave, Hampshire, and Cambridge streets.
Nicola Williams
I'll work with other municipality leaders in our neighboring cities on a regional strategy to support their issues. Transit safety represents a pivotal intersection of the issues I care about: accessible & affordable transit, environmentalism, and equity. That's why I've taken the Cambridge Bicycle Safety pledge. I've also been in touch with Cambridge Bicycle Safety group in March to discuss bicycle and pedestrian safety, particularly how Cambridge Bicycle Safety can work with local businesses in helping to achieve their goal of protected bike lanes through all of Mass Ave.
Quinton Zondervan
I have consistently voted and advocated for significant traffic safety improvements throughout the city, including a difficult vote early in the term to redo Inman Sq. with protected infrastructure, despite significant opposition from many of my supporters to that particular project. I consistently prioritize traffic safety for our most vulnerable road users, and I am committed to reforming our car-centric transportation model into a safer and more sustainable model based on public transit, bicycle and pedestrian primacy over cars.

Policy Proposals

1. How will you ensure implementation of the infrastructure changes needed to slow traffic on your community’s streets, and improve crosswalks and intersections to make them safer for people who are walking and using mobility assistive devices?
Burhan Azeem
We need to push our city manager. Somerville does far more to improve crosswalk and bike safety and that is because they have a strong mayor that buys into the changes. Our city manager does not, we need to push him to do so or get a new city manager.
Dennis Carlone
I am proud to have worked to lower speed limits on most side streets in Cambridge to 20 MPH. I continue to work toward increasing protections for cyclists and pedestrians - we need to prioritize these modes of transportation. I would like to see improvements to our transit system in addition (including city-sponsored shuttles to underserved neighborhoods), both for accessibility and affordability so that all people have the option to use these methods instead of driving. Crosswalks at dangerous intersections need improved signalling to protect pedestrians with strollers and mobility issues especially. Including car-free zones in areas of our city would be a good step towards reducing emissions and increasing safety.
Charles Franklin
We must show the city that these changes are a priority for the council, the residents, and commuters. The council can add policy orders to general meeting agendas which gives the public an opportunity to speak on the record. The policy orders themselves can be designed to push the city to hold community meetings so they can hear more directly what we need to feel safe on the streets. I attended a rally recently when the city declined to add protected bike lanes to Webster Ave. These types of events get the attention of the community at large and are hard to ignore. The ultimate tool to force the city to move forward with implementing road safety improvements is to pass a city ordinance. Recently, an ordinance was passed requiring the city to add protected bike lanes to streets specified by the city’s official bike network plan when the street is redone.
Craig Kelley
I will continue to advocate for slower speed limits in Cambridge, something I helped pass as the City went to a 20 MPH limit on most streets but in many places even 20 MPH is too fast. City staff says it will take years to get all the streets appropriately signed with this new limit and I will continue to push for increased funding and staffing to make this implementation happen faster. Slower speeds, to include the speeds of cyclists and other non-car platforms, make everyone safer. I will work for faster responses to sidewalk safety issues through better implementation of See/Click/Fix responses and will continue to work to get the City to properly sign (and enforce) pedestrian-only sidewalk areas like Central Square. I will work with traffic staff to review our traffic signal timing, timing that often does not allow slower walkers enough time to cross the street and I will support infrastructure changes, like the median strips on Mt. Auburn, that force drivers to slow down and will work with city staff to improve our intersection treatments to increase the yield percentage at crosswalks for both car and cyclists/scooters/skateboards.
Derek Kopon
While the city has made progress with traffic calming measures at a few locations in the city, these changes are proceeding gradually with many intersections and streets still needing more attention to make them safer. Just to list a few examples, there are stretches of Linnaean, Garden, and Concord Ave where cars frequently barrel down the road and then come to a rapid stop if there is a pedestrian in the cross walk. One crosswalk on Concord Ave. in particular has a pedestrian crosswalk directly after a series of parked cars, so oncoming drivers do not see the person in the crosswalk until the person has passed the front of the parked car. The result is drivers frequently slamming on the breaks. One could imagine a whole host of traffic calming measures that could be implemented here, such as curb extensions, a polymer overlay to change the texture and color of the crosswalk relative to the road, a raised crosswalk, etc. Like our network of protected bikes lanes, which is discontinuous, our crosswalk safety and traffic calming measures need to be applied everywhere in the city consistently and uniformly.
Alanna Mallon
The Council has reduced speeds to 20mph in all Squares, and also asked Traffic and Parking to produce a list of hundreds of streets to be reduced to 20mph, prioritizing the most dangerous to go first in the fall. I also support installing speed cushions to enforce these reduced speed limits. I have also worked to keep large trucks off of our side streets, and asked the City to work with navigation apps like Google Maps and Waze to keep our side streets from becoming major thoroughfares.
Marc McGovern
I supported Cambridge reducing speed limits in our city to 25 mph. I think we can even drop those limits to 20 mph in many areas. I would like to see better coordination of traffic signals. I have taken action and will continue to take action to install crosswalks and stop signs in areas to slow down traffic. I also think we need to launch a public education campaign about the dangers of speeding.
Jeffery McNary
feedback from residents via policy pods with experts and residents and colleagues
Adriane Musgrave
Cambridge has been making good progress on traffic slowing by reducing the speed limit to 20 MPH, enhancing crosswalks with lights, and requiring that street reconstructions add protected bike lanes. More work is needed. Cars still disregard the speed limit; many crosswalks are still unsafe; and we need a full network of protected lanes to create cycling safety. These are important issues to me and I’ve seen how they get passed. As city councilor, I will follow the playbook by focusing my attention to street safety, collaborating with city staff, and rallying our residents to build community pressure.
Patty Nolan
City Council’s role starts with passing policies and ordinances for infrastructure changes. The change to a maximum speed of 20 mph in all major squares started with an idea, followed by community advocacy, discussion by the Council, review and vote. Without community ideas, advocacy and support, changes like that don’t happen. It’s a prime example of how to enact positive change. More review of speed limits is necessary. And, the design of streets to ensure safety like bump outs at crosswalks, needs to include the community. I would approach these changes through good governance process: identify options, work with a range of groups to decide which are the most promising, bring together city and community folks to discuss how to best implement, and decide which ones to implement under a clear timetable. Often people need multiple ways and times to learn about possible changes. Background, research and rationale must be included or change is resisted. The Council has a very important role in accountability and oversight – a power it should use more. Cambridge needs to make use of technology to communicate AND to generate data about the safety and effectiveness of policies.
John Pitkin
In my Mid-Cambridge neighborhood the first step would be to determine problem spots and what infrastructure changes would help. On the main streets, Cambridge Street, Broadway, Prospect Street, enforcement should be the main tool. The last thing we should be doing is creating obstacles that slow T buses. On longer side streets with through traffic as well as Harvard Street, speed bumps such as those on Rindge Avenue should be considered. There are a number of crosswalks without signals on Mass. Ave. in Mid-Cambridge, where an actuated flashing light, as on Beacon Street at Cooney (Somerville), could be tried. In general and especially for other neighborhoods and development districts, I would rely input from residents at a Transportation Forum for guidance. I am not a traffic expert.
Sumbul Siddiqui
This term, I have promoted traffic-calming measures and improvements to our bicycle infrastructure. To increase bicycle ridership and decrease motor vehicle speed, I supported the “Cycling Safety Ordinance.” To improve pedestrian safety, I co-sponsored a policy order to identify traffic-calming and safety features for the Fresh Pond Mall area as the current conditions in the lot compromise pedestrian and bicyclist safety by failing to clearly separate where vehicles should travel and where to expect pedestrians and cyclists moving safely. To protect pedestrians in congested areas, I joined another colleague, Councillor Alanna Mallon, in installing a pedestrian Super LPI at the intersection of Mass Ave, Prospect St., and Western Ave to give pedestrians a 10-15 head start on traffic.
E. Denise Simmons
In Cambridge, the City Council works both by issuing work orders to our City Manager, to ensure that he prioritizes those items that we urge him to; and we also have the bully pulpit, which we can utilize to put public pressure on the City administration to take specific actions. I will continue to utilize both of these avenues.
Ben Simon
The prevalence of for-profit bicycle and motorized scooter companies, while nominally environmentally friendly pose there own environmental concerns and pose a danger to pedestrians, especially the elderly and children. Consequently we should regulate and tax these companies and use the revenue generated to pay for improvements to transit infrastructure improvements such as traffic calming measures like raised intersections. But I think even better than trying to produce safe driving behavior by changing our infrastructure, we should be looking into ways to incentivize people to not drive at all. An excellent, fully-funded public transit system that functioned better and more cheaply for the consumer (maybe it could be free?) would be a good way to do that.
Jivan Sobrinho-Wheeler
Municipal sidewalk snow removal will make it easier and safer for pedestrians in Cambridge’s long winters. It will reduce traffic by enabling older and disabled who may otherwise be car-dependent to walk more as well. We also need to implement traffic tables and bump outs to ensure cars aren’t treating heavily populated sections of Cambridge like highways. Completing the city-wide network of protected bike lanes will not only make our streets less dangerous for cyclists, it will also make them safer for pedestrians by calming car traffic. We need to add both temporary “quick-build” lanes and push for the kind of permanent protected bike-lanes that are mandated by the Cambridge Cycling Safety Ordinance I helped push for with Cambridge Bike Safety. Studies show that protected bike lanes calm traffic and reduce conflicts between cyclists, drivers, and pedestrians on confusing sections of streets and intersections. Along with pedestrian and bus infrastructural changes, they send the message that our streets are for everyone, whether or not you can afford a car.
Nicola Williams
Through my work as a board member of Harvard Square Neighborhood Association, I have also been supporting the efforts of the Memorial Drive Alliance – comprising of environmentalists, bicycle groups, and others. Our shared goals are saving the trees along Memorial drive and adding separate bike lanes in part on Memorial Drive itself, thus limiting vehicular traffic to two lanes and bike lanes to two lanes. This will reduce traffic and make it safer for people who are walking and using mobility assistive devices so they don't have to negotiate with cyclists.
Quinton Zondervan
Thanks in part to my advocacy and leadership, Cambridge will be lowering speed limits on most side streets to 20 MPH. All remaining streets controlled by the city are already at 25 MPH. Also mentioned earlier is the bike safety ordinance, first in the nation, which I helped move through the council. I’m constantly pushing for traffic calming, lane reductions and other measures that will slow down vehicular traffic and improve safety. Along with Councillor Devereux, I’m part of a coalition of local organizations advocating with DCR to reduce vehicular lanes on Memorial Drive, and reclaim the space for pedestrian and bicycle modes, as well as for tree canopy expansion. I recently met with neighbors who want to turn their street into a neighborway, and I’m helping them navigate their project through the bureaucracy; I’ve already gotten the city to commit to adding this street to their road improvement plan. Ultimately I want to see car free zones in all major squares in Cambridge: Kendall, Central, Harvard, Porter (and Davis in Somerville).
2. How will you improve the reach, frequency, and quality of public transit in Boston?
Burhan Azeem
The state does not understand how much our cities rely on the MBTA - we need municipal representation.
Dennis Carlone
The MBTA is not meeting the needs of its users. I firmly believe that access to transportation is a human right, along with housing and food. In our society, we cannot live without it and with soaring property prices more and more people are commuting to their jobs from far afield. We need to improve and increase the bus lines to expand the net of service. Funding the MBTA will help with this goal, and support from our wealthies institutions (Harvard and MIT) will be vital. We need to work together as a council to put pressure on the Statehouse to lift the austerity measures in place which are contributing to the deterioration of the MBTA. We need to use the power of City Special Permit process such as making CambridgeSide provide a shuttle service to the RedLine that was free for anyone to use. In the first year, 500,000 people used the service.
Charles Franklin
The MBTA currently does not do a good job of serving all of Cambridge’s residents. Some areas like North and West Cambridge only serviced by busses that run once every hour. This is too slow. I will push the City Council/Manager to provide its own assessment of where we need new bus lines, and to determine what changes to the bus schedule are needed to better serve our residents. I would also ask the City Manager to see if there are additional infrastructural improvements we can make to reduce bus dwell times and headways, e.g., by adding more bus lanes where appropriate. However, there is also only so much influence we can have on the MBTA, as it is a state organization. I am in favor of Cambridge having its own short minibus transit system parallel to the MBTA.Perhaps we could model it after Lexington’s Lexpress system. I believe many tight-looped bus-lines connecting key points in the city will increase use of public ridership as well as give greater access to mobility limited residents.
Craig Kelley
The City can do much to improve public transit. The City must ensure bus stops are used only for buses. I am currently coordinating a study with the Harvard Kennedy School that is reviewing how effective CPD and Parking Control Officers are at keeping people from illegally parking in bus stops, an offense that may seem minor to the offender but can be very impactful to anyone trying to get onto, or bicycle past, a bus that cannot access the curb because of an illegally parked car. The City also needs to do a better job of installing and updating “Next Bus” type notification systems because a significant reason people do not take buses is because they are not sure when the next bus is coming. In conjunction with the MBTA, the City needs to implement bus priority lanes that buses will actually use, which may require City investment in specific contracted transit support to help the T meet very time specific transportation peak needs. As ride-hailing apps change the face of transportation, the City must work more effectively with both TNCs and taxis, as well as private transit systems, to create a seamless system of network-based transit options that fill in gaps in our MBTA lines.
Derek Kopon
The branch of public transit most in need of upgrades and infrastructure improvements, the T, is not directly under the purview of the City of Cambridge or the City Council. The red line has been operating at (or sometimes over) capacity for some time, with virtually no substantial infrastructure improvements in decades. I first rode the red line during a summer internship at MIT back in 2002. Since then, the only noticeable changes to the red line in 17 years are a change in seat covers and the change from tokens to the Charlie Card (personally, I miss the tokens). Two months ago, Kendall square leaders publicly declared a transportation emergency with particular attention and criticism given to the MBTA T and bus infrastructure. Lack of sufficient municipal planning and infrastructure improvement have left us in a situation where, to quote the Kendall square leaders, “Today’s red line travelers in Kendall Square often find themselves on full trains and crowded platforms, sometimes getting left behind…The increase of passengers will greatly exacerbate today’s problems.” I will pressure the state legislature to provide funding and priority to these problems.
Alanna Mallon
As a Councillor, I make it my priority to be constantly out in the community to understand the needs of our residents. That’s why I introduced a policy order to ask for more bus service on Concord Ave, and opposed many of the MBTA’s “improvements” to the Better Bus Project, which would decrease service to many residents who rely on bus service. I also supported Councilor Michelle Wu’s efforts in opposing the MBTA fare hike, as well as her myriad of alternatives for raising revenue for the T that do not put the burden on to lower income riders.
Marc McGovern
I supported the City of Cambridge investing $25 million to ensure funding for the Green Line Extension. I supported Cambridge implementing bus only lanes. I would like to see the city invest more in improvements to the Red Line. I would like to see the roll out of more bus only lanes.
Jeffery McNary
on the ground interaction with regularity
Adriane Musgrave
I served as a local leader during the #UnfairHikes #FixTheT rally to push for transit improvements and new funding streams. As a city official I will use my role to advocate for state-level improvements and push locally for change. - Better Buses: Cambridge hosts one-third of the key bus routes in the metro area (1, 66, 71, 73, and 77). I want to make the 71/73 bus pilot project permanent and extend the 77priority lane into Cambridge. Other key routes and high-use local routes (47 & 70) should be next. - Kendall Sq./Cambridge Crossing: We must find new ways to get commuters in/out of this critical commercial corridor via mass transit. Priorities include the Grand Junction transit concept; pushing for Kendall Sq. T improvements, which is the 8th busiest and 5th fastest growing stop in the system; advocating for the Red-Blue line connection; and creating dedicated bus lanes in the area. - Transit deserts: a large portion of the city is not served by any route offering all-day frequent service so we should explore and test new models, including micro-mobility options. - Ride-Hailing: Explore options to regulate ride-hailing firms to re-incentivize public transit.
Patty Nolan
A key reason people use their cars is public transit is unreliable, and/or not very accessible. Working with the MBTA, the city need to look at each bus routes potential –explore how to increase frequency of buses along major routes & implement bus only priority sections, like the pilot on Mt. Auburn Street. Buses on the major arteries are not frequent enough, especially for non traditional commuting hours. Plus, I would advocate strongly for more continuous routes – instead of the current system requiring transfers in Harvard or Central Square. Another lapse is the lack of a north –southbus through Cambridge – that is another key route the T should serve. For the subway, the city needs to work with the T to increase the capacity of the overloaded Red Line. The new cars in process should help, yet the signaling system has to be improved to increase frequency of trains at rush hour, so no one ever thinks taking a car is faster. The lack of a connection between the new Green Line Extension to the Red Line – at either Davis or Porter – is astonishing. That is unlikely to be fixed soon, but thinking long term, it is essential, like the North South commuter rail link
John Pitkin
I think the City should strive to increase the speed, punctuality, frequency and comfort of bus service through, to and from Cambridge. I support more bus priority lanes and signals, as on Mt. Auburn Street. Information on bus arrival times should be displayed at all major stops. I would advocate for a new commuter rail stop and more frequent service near Alewife. Since I am not an expert on citywide transit needs, again, I would look to input from residents at a new Transportation Forum for guidance on where there are needs that could be addressed by new services to underserved areas. Cambridge is growing and so should our transit system.
Sumbul Siddiqui
To increase efficiency, I support the creation of separate bus lanes on major corridors. This will make bus routes run more smoothly, creating an incentive for commuters who currently get to work in single-rider vehicles to switch to a more environmentally friendly and traffic-reducing alternative. I also support more residential construction within walking distance of a T stop or frequently running bus line. For example, we should consider upzoning along Prospect St. between Central Square and Inman Square, in light of the future Green Line stop at Union Square. I would also keep in mind the populations that most need access to public transit, such as disabled people and senior citizens. New infrastructure and housing built should accommodate these folks, as it may be harder for them to bike or walk long distances. To improve reach, I support measures to reduce MBTA fares. Our ultimate goal should be to eliminate fares altogether, and move towards a system of free public transit; the price of a train ride shouldn’t keep anyone from making it to school or work. I am also supportive of shuttle bus service.
E. Denise Simmons
We made a big step towards this by voting in favor of allocating millions of dollars to the Green Line extension in Union Square. I think we are going to need to turn up the public pressure on the Baker administration, though, in order to address the issues that continue to plague the MBTA.
Ben Simon
The MBTA is criminally underfunded and I think that is the biggest obstacle to improved service. Public Transit is a public good and as so it should be on the state's books instead of being run like a private business as it currently is. We should look into ways to tax our local 1% to raise revenue to support our public transit and support similar efforts at the state level like State Rep. Mike Connolly's bill HD 2849. Harvard, MIT, big tech and big pharma are enormously profitable institutions that are completely reliant on the MBTA to exist, and yet the pay next to nothing in taxes. Harvard for example is the second wealthiest private non-profit in the world after only the Vatican(!), they pay significantly lower PILOTS than other universities and they are failing to pay the agreed on amounts! They must pay more in taxes and that revenue can help to make improvements to the MBTA as well as other desperately needed social spending projects like the creation of social housing. I would like to add that transit improvements are known to cause displacement to vulnerable communities so I would want to push for tenant protections and anti-displacement zones alongside any improvements.
Jivan Sobrinho-Wheeler
Public transit is at the core of our Cambridge Green New Deal proposal. Improving buses and subways means fewer car emissions, but it also means improving commutes for thousands of lower-income people and people of color who depend on public transit to get to work, to doctor’s appointments, and to live their lives. It’s a way of tackling climate change, income inequality, and racial inequity at the same time. That’s why we’re pushing to make buses and subways free for Cambridge residents by 2025. Our plan involves purchasing monthly passes for Cambridge residents—half of whom already qualify for discounts because they’re under 18, students, over 65, etc—paid for by congestion pricing, PILOT payments from our two universities with $1 Billion+ endowments, and progressive property taxes. This will also add revenue to the MBTA to help fix the T. We’ll also push for bus priority lanes, bus-rapid transit, and local micro-transit. As the Mt Auburn St traffic study made clear, on some streets more than half of people commute by bus but 90% of vehicles are cars. By making it easier to commute by bus we create a virtuous cycle reducing traffic and improving commutes.
Nicola Williams
The MBTA has largely been a huge disappointment for Cambridge residents. While fares have gone up, service has gone down. We just received word that Red Line services would not return to their normal speed until October, which will mean longer commutes and likely more packed trains. We need to increase the amount of trains operating, the number of cars, and expand access to areas that have been left out geographically and economically. This will take strategy, pressure, and investment from the many wealthy institutions that call Cambridge and Greater Boston home (such as MIT and Harvard). That's why I want to talk to other city councils across the region to put pressure on the state and allow us to transform the service and reach of the MBTA, within our communities, to make it equitable and inexpensive.
Quinton Zondervan
I’ve called for free public transit buses in Cambridge, owned and operated by the city. If Harvard and MIT can operate private shuttles, why can’t we operate public ones to help people get around? I’ve called for free MBTA passes for all public school students, and i’ve said that the T should be free for all riders. I’ve advocated with the MBTA to improve maintenance on its stations and trains in Cambridge. I’m calling for equitable congestion pricing (low income drivers wouldn’t pay) on our highways so that we can generate additional revenues for public transit. We should have congestion pricing surcharges on Uber/Lyft rides in and out of Cambridge (Cambridge resident Uber/Lyft drivers would be exempt), with the money going to public transit. I will continue to advocate with the state to lift their absurd austerity measures imposed on the MBTA and properly fund our public transit infrastructure so it can service our residents.
3. How will you ensure fast-tracked implementation of a city-wide network of off-street paths and protected bike lanes on major thoroughfares and connecting streets that are safe and comfortable for people of all ages and abilities?
Burhan Azeem
By law.
Dennis Carlone
We need to work to push more bike safety ordinances and ensure the creation of protected bike lanes doesn't have to wait until a street is redone. First of all, it needs to be comprehensive and include related pedestrian improvements where needed. Many people ride a bike but everyone is a pedestrian. I plan to push the council and our city manager to use our considerable resources to increase transit options - increased shuttles in areas that are underserved but in need, like the Alewife shuttle, as well as better protected bike lanes, and more pedestrian paths. We need to ensure these lanes are spaced appropriately and well designed to mitigate any more tragedies.
Charles Franklin
As stated before, an ordinance was recently passed requiring the city to add protected bike lanes to streets specified by the city’s official bike network plan when the street is redone. This is a great step forward, but we can't wait until a street is scheduled to be redone. A bike lane or off street path should always be under construction. Again, this requires pressuring the city manager to act more swiftly to identify the most dangerous roads and intersections for cyclist and pedestrian safety improvements. Policy orders and public demonstrations have proven themselves successful in the past to move him forward on important issues, and we will continue to employ them.
Craig Kelley
I have not owned a car for over a decade and my family gets around town almost entirely by bike. I understand the complex dangers of bicycling and nothing is more important to me than bike safety. Where the City has a safe design for bicycling, such as the contra-flow lane on Brattle Street, I am supportive. Unfortunately, the City has a history of creating dangerous, sometimes deadly, bicycle facilities like the bike lanes in Central Square where a cyclist was killed by a bus soon after their installation. The idea of removing the North Mass Ave Median Strip for any reason fills me with fear for myself, my family and the thousands of other people who use that stretch of road. Getting rid of the Median Strip, something the City first planned over 20 years ago, would make the street more dangerous for all users, especially cyclists. Removing parking at specific choke points along the Avenue would be a much better safety solution, as would creating a bikeway along Sherman Street from Rindge to Huron. Addressing intersection conflicts with stanchions, forcing cars to be slower and more deliberate in their turns, would make streets safer as would better traffic enforcement policies.
Derek Kopon
I support rapid implementation of the 2015 Cambridge Bicycle Plan. I personally do not feel safe when I am biking on the roads of Cambridge, particularly along Mass Ave and any other major thoroughfare that does not have contiguous protected bike lanes. The current city council is simultaneously trying to encourage people to bike and use public transport by getting rid of minimum parking requirements on new development, yet not moving nearly quickly enough to provide cyclists the safe infrastructure with which to do so. Every morning, I see cyclists trying to navigate the area between moving automobile traffic and parked cars, whose driver-side doors can open at any moment. It is dangerous and irresponsible that we still do not have a contiguous network of protected bike lanes. In line with the Cambridge bicycle safety pledge, I will do everything in my power—including voting with the City Council and working with the City Staff— to ensure that the City of Cambridge installs continuous protected bicycle lanes along the entire length of Mass Ave. These improvements should also include bus transit priority and pedestrian safety improvements, where feasible and applicable.
Alanna Mallon
I maintain a close working relationship with Cambridge Bicycle Safety and support their efforts to complete our protected bike network - especially efforts to identify key transit corridors that could be rapidly served by quick build solutions. I also think income should be a larger part of this discussion. For too many families, a bike is a luxury, and I have already proposed a partnership between cycling advocates, the CHA, and the City to establish a low income bike program. This would give our low income residents access to bikes and the skills to repair and maintain them.
Marc McGovern
As mentioned previously, I brought Cambridge Bike Safety and the City together to author a first of it's kind ordinance to implement protected bike lanes during major street construction. I will continue to push for pop up and quick build lanes, as I did with Cambridge St. and Brattle St. I will continue to advocate for additional funding toward building out our bike infrastructure network and I have signed the Cambridge Bike Safety pledge to call for this network to be completed within five years.
Jeffery McNary
demand enforcement of current regulations
Adriane Musgrave
In May the city launched the 2020 Bike Plan update process that will take 18 months. It is critical that protected bike lanes top the priority list since they are the best way to ensure safety. Having the city commit to building lanes will allow us to hold our city government accountable to the promises we have collectively made as a community. But we also can’t wait 18 months for change. We know they are the safest options; we know the most dangerous stretches of road; and we know the roads with the highest bike traffic. Every year we should build 4 miles of dedicated lanes if we are to reach out goal of creating a connected network. But this year we built none. I stand with Cambridge Bike Safety in calling for Mass Ave, our most dangerous stretch of road, to be our next top priority. In passing the first-in-the nation ordinance requiring that protected lanes be built when roads are reconstructed, we learned how to win key policy advancements. It requires applying focused attention on bike safety solutions, collaborating with city staff, and rallying our residents to build community pressure. I plan to follow this winning playbook when elected.
Patty Nolan
The key to effective governance is oversight, monitoring and systems of accountability. The 2015 Cambridge bike plan is a comprehensive document that lays out the issues and presents information clearly & allows people to understand the city’s infrastructure and safety and comfort levels as a whole. The documentation of need– the visual color coding of which streets are which comfort level for cyclists – presents a framework for developing a city-wide network of paths and protected bike lanes to enable safe travel throughout and across the city. Making that plan a reality will require focused attention, a timetable that is public, and regular reporting of progress to the Council, and all bike citizen groups – to ensure accountability. Too often plans are not followed through because accountability is not clearly stated and monitored. Gaining agreement on a timetable that is appropriately fast will require a willingness to push back if there is a reluctance to agree to a specific timetable. A good way to ensure implementation is to have a public dashboard with milestones and dates – so on a regular basis, everyone in the city (or outside) can see progress towards the goals
John Pitkin
Here especially I would look to a new, representative Transportation Forum for guidance. Our streets are a complex system that must work for all users (including tradespeople, delivery vehicles, transit and school buses, ride services for elderly and handicapped, emergency vehicles, and customers of local and neighborhood businesses), and a one-size-fits-all approach is probably not workable. Continued, representative and responsible public input and oversight will expedite successful implementation.
Sumbul Siddiqui
Research indicates that people are far more likely to use protected bike lanes than unprotected ones, and I am supportive of capital investments to create protected bike lanes. This term, I co-sponsored the Cycling Safety Ordinance, which requires the City to construct permanent protected bike lanes on all streets identified for reconstruction under our Five Year Sidewalk & Street Plan. Requiring these lanes to be constructed as part of existing infrastructure projects will ensure that they remain a priority and are built in a timely manner. I also co-sponsored a policy order supporting the implementation protected bike lanes on Webster Ave, Museum Way, O’Brien Highway, and Craigie Bridge. Cambridge Bicycle Safety has identified top-priority streets for constructing protected bike lanes, including the length of Massachusetts Avenue, Hampshire Street, Broadway Street, and other high bicycle-traffic roads. These recommendations can guide our efforts to implement protected bike lanes. Finally, as many who work in Cambridge live in Somerville and vice versa, we should prioritize collaboration with Somerville to build protected bike lanes on connecting streets between the two cities.
E. Denise Simmons
I have voted in favor of this citywide network, with the caveat that there's wrong way to the right thing. "Faster" is not always "wiser," and I want the City to move with deliberate speed in this process - but I do not want this done *at the expense* of planning to protect against unintended consequences (for example, I would not want a stretch of protected bicycle lanes to be situated in such a way that an ambulance could no longer be parked in front of a senior building). This is why the City needs to work deliberatively and collaboratively with all stakeholders to ensure this is done as quickly as possible, but also as thoughtfully as possible.
Ben Simon
I am not well-informed on the city process for approving and implementing this infrastructure so I'm unsure how to respond other than to say that I would learn it and support this infrastructure to the utmost I am able as a city councillor. As I've mentioned above though, I'm generally anti-car and would love to push for getting them entirely off certain streets, leaving them open for safer walking and biking. But I recognize that this may be a less immediately realizable goal politically speaking and so protected bike-lanes and bike paths are something to fight for right away. It's often good though to have a more radical long-term demand and a less radical short term one at the same time, as the ""scariness"" of the more radical one to the powerful people and institutions that benefit from the status quo may encourage them to accept the less scary one. This was seen recently in Berlin when a massively popular movement to nationalize buildings of some of the biggest corporate landlords and add them to the social housing stock led to a 5-year rent freeze.
Jivan Sobrinho-Wheeler
Along with fellow members of Cambridge Bike Safety, I helped push for the Cambridge Cycling Safety Ordinance, which mandates the addition of protected bike lanes to major streets in Cambridge when they are due for reconstruction. But we also need to demand that the city move faster to save lives and add protected bike lanes along the city-wide network now. In Cambridge, the City Manager, who serves at the will of the City Council, oversees city staff in deciding when protected bike lanes, bus priority lanes and pedestrian improvements will be added to streets. As a Councilor, I'll bring the activist approach I’m used to from local organizing work to city government and keep pressure up to implement what the vast majority of Cambridge residents have said they want—safer streets, improved public transit, and a city-wide bike network. One other piece of creating a network in Cambridge is improving Memorial Dr, which is run by the state DCR. Right now, there are 4 lanes of cars and a narrow sidewalk for cyclists, runners, and walkers. As a Councilor, I'll use my platform to demand a safe-streets redesign reducing traffic to two lanes and expand the bike and walking paths.
Nicola Williams
As I have said before, as a community activist, I've already been working to do just this with the Memorial Drive Alliance and have shared insights with the Cambridge Bicycle Safety group about how they can work with local businesses to receive community input, build consensus, and reduce hostilities between cyclists and non-cyclists. As a city councillor, I will take my experience and these initiatives with me to the table and make them a major order of business.
Quinton Zondervan
As mentioned I helped shepherd the bike safety ordinance, but even that won’t move fast enough. In addition I’m calling for more “quick-build” projects like we’ve done on Cambridge St., South Mass. Ave. and Porter Sq. among others. The city has done far too few of these projects, and we continue to lose friends and neighbors to vehicular traffic. We have seen progress when we’ve really pushed, including in Porter Square where the staff had no plans to install protected lanes until strong community (and council) pushback; now they will begin a design with protected lanes next year. We’ve had two pedestrian fatalities and one bicycle fatality in the last 2 years in Cambridge, and that rate is unacceptable. We need to expect more of our City Manager on this front: the quick build projects simply aren’t coming fast enough. We are a wealthy city with vast resources; there is no need to wait for mitigation money from development to move ahead with projects that provide basic safety to residents.

Additional Questions

1. Vision Zero is an approach which aims to eliminate traffic fatalities and serious injuries and has been adopted by Boston, Cambridge, and Somerville, and many other cities across the country. Do you support the principles of Vision Zero policies and funding for their rapid implementation?
Burhan Azeem
Strongly Support
Dennis Carlone
Strongly Support
Charles Franklin
Strongly Support
Absolutely. We must continually strive to decrease traffic fatalities. I know we can do better. Many European countries already have two to four times less accidents than we do. According to the World Health Organization, 27% of worldwide traffic fatalities in 2013 where pedestrians and cyclists. We cannot accept that, so we must and can do better.
Craig Kelley
Strongly Support
Vision Zero has a wide variety of actions steps such as enforcement, special slow speed zones, equity and enhanced intersection safety that make a huge amount of sense and that I enthusiastically support, to include increased funding and accountability to help ensure their rapid implementation.
Derek Kopon
Strongly Support
Yes, with emphasis on the words "rapid implementation." Many cyclists, including myself, feel that progress has been made, but continues to move too slowly.
Alanna Mallon
Strongly Support
Marc McGovern
Strongly Support
Vision Zero cannot just be a policy that gathers dust on a self. It must be enacted and enacted quickly.
Jeffery McNary
Somewhat Support
Adriane Musgrave
Strongly Support
Patty Nolan
Strongly Support
As a volunteer board member of Green Street Initiative and supporter of many initiatives in the schools to get not only students but staff to use their cars less often, I know that with concerted effort we can change behavior. People need to feel comfortable and safe. And they sometimes need to be encourage to try something new - the whole premise of GSI WalkRide Days is that, and it has been very effective at getting many people to actually change behavior. Vision Zero is possible!
John Pitkin
Somewhat Support
Sumbul Siddiqui
Strongly Support
E. Denise Simmons
Strongly Support
Ben Simon
Strongly Support
Jivan Sobrinho-Wheeler
Strongly Support
Nicola Williams
Strongly Support
Quinton Zondervan
Strongly Support
2. One key strategy that has been proven to effectively reduce speeding, improve safety, and remove racial bias in traffic enforcement in other states and countries is automated enforcement (i.e. speed cameras and red light cameras). Do you support S.1376, An Act relative to automated enforcement, which if passed would authorize cities and towns in Massachusetts to opt into the use of automated enforcement? To see the full text of the bill, go here.
Burhan Azeem
Strongly Support
Dennis Carlone
Strongly Support
Charles Franklin
Strongly Oppose
I am absolutely in favor of stricter enforcement of traffic laws. However, I have strong privacy concerns with speed and red light cameras. In particular, I don’t like giving computers the power to issue citations. I say this as a black man and software engineer. Computerized ticketing introduces its own set of biases, and does not preclude others, particularly racial biases from appearing in other parts of the ticketing process [e.g appeals]. I’m also not convinced that red-light cameras necessarily increase safety. I’ve read a number of papers that make the opposite claim.
Craig Kelley
Strongly Support
Red-light cameras are one more tool Cambridge, and other municipalities, should be able to access to improve street safety. Their use must be coordinated with the City’s ground-breaking surveillance ordinance and be managed in such a way as to protect privacy and prevent the abuse of data. There is some evidence that, in some places, red light cameras do not provide the hoped for benefits but, as with other street safety programs, this is not a ‘one size fits all’ idea and the City should be able to decide where such cameras would provide a positive safety outcome.
Derek Kopon
Somewhat Support
I support passage of the bill in order to give cities and towns freedom to implement this measure if they choose. However, I am a privacy advocate and am generally uncomfortable with widespread proliferation of video cameras in public places. I would first want to consider infrastructure and traffic calming techniques to reduce speeding. If these are not sufficient, then I would support automated enforcement on major thoroughfares away from residential neighborhoods only.
Alanna Mallon
Strongly Oppose
Replacing police officers with cameras doesn't eliminate racial bias, and we should be doing the hard but necessary work of anti-bias training in all departments in our City, including on our police force. Additionally, our police force has a strong emphasis on community policing that should be encouraged, not replaced with cameras, which would be a temporary band aid on a systemic problem. I would also add that given the troubling direction of our country, we do not want to add more cameras to our streets which are collecting more information about people and their movements.
Marc McGovern
Somewhat Support
Although I see the value of cameras as a way to improve safety, I worry about civil liberties and any data collected being used to target certain individuals. I would want to be sure how data was being used, how long it was being stored for and who had access to that data.
Jeffery McNary
Somewhat Support
Adriane Musgrave
Somewhat Oppose
The ACLU has long opposed red light cameras due to concerns related to public safety, due process, and privacy. Stated concerns in MA can be found here: https://privacysos.org/redlight/ And relevant concerns from the RI ACLU can be found here: http://www.riaclu.org/blog/post/traffic-cameras.-if-you-arent-mad-about-them-you-should-be
Patty Nolan
Strongly Support
I support this bill, especially since people I support and know - Reps. Jon Hecht, Mike Connolly and Sen. Brownberger are lead sponsors. However, I do want to note that I am worried about the surveillance state and the loss of civil liberties in too many areas of life. While this bill does not lead to that, we all must be aware of the potential for date to be misused by the government.
John Pitkin
Strongly Support
Sumbul Siddiqui
Strongly Support
I support as long as it meets the intended goals and is not used for surveillance, and I believe any locations for automated enforcement must be approved through a very public process.
E. Denise Simmons
Strongly Support
Ben Simon
Somewhat Support
I strongly support reducing fatalities, but I'm also concerned with putting too many surveillance tools in the hands of a state that we know uses this technology unethically and has been proven to lie to the public about its use of it as well. I'd like to learn more about how these cameras would work, what images exactly they would capture, and to what extent we could ensure they would not be used for any unethical purpose by state intelligence or private intelligence actors. Not to beat a dead horse, but people won't be able to drive unsafely when no one is driving!
Jivan Sobrinho-Wheeler
Strongly Support
Nicola Williams
Strongly Support
Quinton Zondervan
Strongly Support
3. Do you support implementation of all of the Better Bike Corridors and other bike projects in the Go Boston 2030 Plan, and making sure all short-term projects are planned and implemented within three years, and long-term projects are implemented by or before 2030?
Burhan Azeem
Strongly Support
I would go further and push for protected bike lanes to then be converted to bike paths.
Dennis Carlone
Strongly Support
Charles Franklin
Strongly Support
I spoke in support of the plan before the city council when it was approved. For even faster rollout, there are many streets with no parking where bike lanes could be protected with trivial effort by putting up pylons until the city is ready to build something more substantial. There is substantial inertia in the city to getting proper protected bike lanes built. The sooner we build protected bike lanes, the more we will encourage cycling and save lives in Cambridge.
Craig Kelley
Neither Support nor Oppose
Quick-build infrastructure can make a lot of sense at times, provided that the City has an appropriate, publicly known way of both outreach about the new layouts and assessing whether the layouts increase safety or not. With the right process and supervision, we can install facilities, see how they work, remove what doesn’t work and expand what does. We need to understand that the term “bike lane” is getting more obsolete every day and whatever we build, quick or otherwise, must reflect today’s increasingly varied non-car transportation options and be flexible enough to meet tomorrow’s needs.
Derek Kopon
Strongly Support
Yes, with emphasis on the words "rapid" and "protected."
Alanna Mallon
Strongly Support
Marc McGovern
Strongly Support
Yes and I have supported these projects.
Jeffery McNary
Strongly Support
Adriane Musgrave
Strongly Support
Patty Nolan
Strongly Support
The pilots in Cambridge should be implemented long enough to gather data on how to do it well. The map in the plan should be treated as a plan - which means it should have timelines and specific goals for implementation.
John Pitkin
Neither Support nor Oppose
Sumbul Siddiqui
Strongly Support
Yes, and community input and residents’ concerns must be taken into consideration so that plans can be implemented as efficiently as possible.
E. Denise Simmons
Strongly Support
Again, I support this but I am adamant that we marry "rapid construction" with "smart implementation." To the extent that these ideals are both taken in equal measure, I fully support this.
Ben Simon
Strongly Support
Jivan Sobrinho-Wheeler
Strongly Support
Yes, and the City must add quick-build protected bike lanes as soon as possible along the entirety of major streets like Hampshire, Broadway, Cambridge, and Mass Ave.
Nicola Williams
Strongly Support
Quinton Zondervan
Strongly Support
4. Do you support creating age-friendly walking conditions in your community -- an issue raised by many seniors as critical to their ability to “age in community”? If yes, how?
Burhan Azeem
Strongly Support
Dennis Carlone
Strongly Support
Sidewalk improvements, crosswalks that allow a longer crossing time and pedestrian-controlled traffic lights, further reducing speeds and decreasing traffic especially at peak hours, and adding car-free zones to ensure seniors can cross any street.
Charles Franklin
Strongly Support
Yes. I think our infrastructure is hostile to the elderly. The timing on some lights is too short for those with mobility issues to safely cross in time. Inman Square timings put pedestrians in the path of cars just as the lights change. Audible cross signals can be louder. I've heard that they are not as loud as they were before, and are now hard to hear over the traffic. This is bad for those who are hearing or vision-impaired. On-street parking can make it hard to see oncoming car and bicycle traffic. We can improve line-of-site to make them safer to cross. More traffic monitors can help.
Craig Kelley
Strongly Support
We need to make sure that sidewalks are made for and used only by pedestrians in any area that sees much sidewalk use at all. That means keeping bikes and scooters and skateboards off our most crowded sidewalks in Harvard Square and Porter Square, stopping our approval of sidewalk-blocking A-frame signs, working with stores to manage the lines that clog sidewalk passage and doing a better job of snow and ice removal. We should also ask our PCOs to report sidewalk defects and put more effort into rapid and effective responses to See/Click/Fix sidewalk issue reports.
Derek Kopon
Strongly Support
As I mentioned in my answer to an earlier question, I believe there are still many crosswalks near residential neighborhoods in need of traffic calming measures. These can take the form of curb extensions, raised crosswalks, narrowing of traffic lanes, inclusion of bike lanes, clear signage indicating an upcoming crosswalk, etc.
Alanna Mallon
Strongly Support
I am often out in our community with our seniors through my food home delivery program, and through my visits to both Millers River and Manning Apartments. I facilitated communication between Cambridge Bike Safety and the CHA to ensure that both the renovation of Millers River Apartments and completion of the Grand Junction move forward. I also make trips to residents’ homes to ensure the safe removal of barriers to sidewalk access, such as obstructive tree roots or cracked concrete.
Marc McGovern
Strongly Support
One complaint I often hear from seniors has to do with the poor conditions of our sidewalks. Although Cambridge has a 5 year plan to address sidewalk reconstruction, there are many sidewalks not on that list. We must move forward with our 5 year plan, but not neglect the immediate need. We also need to ensure that street markings and pavings are updated and clear.
Jeffery McNary
Strongly Support
strict enforcement of current regs
Adriane Musgrave
Strongly Support
One of the simplest ways we can increase our seniors' quality of life is by installing more benches. In North Cambridge, for example, I've repeatedly heard this request. Currently we only have two benches per side for the entire stretch of Mass. Ave from Porter Square to Route 16.
Patty Nolan
Strongly Support
Cambridge has amazing programs for seniors, and is a remarkable city for growing old, in terms of city program. However, many seniors do worry about walking conditions. This area is one where we can and should do better.
John Pitkin
Strongly Support
Smoother sidewalks, fewer bricks, criminal prosecution of cyclists who recklessly collide with a pedestrian. The last would help raise awareness and change the culture. My wife, age 75, is terrified of cyclists.
Sumbul Siddiqui
Strongly Support
Promoting walkability and accessibility is essential for our seniors. I’ve worked with the City Manager to install benches near MBTA stops (Windsor and Cambridge Street), and near Porter Square. I’ve also brought to the City Manager’s attention dangerous sidewalks that aren’t in the sidewalk reconstruction plan that need to be looked at.
E. Denise Simmons
Strongly Support
We need a public awareness campaign for all who use our public ways - no one's safety can be placed above anyone else's. Bicyclists have a right to expect safe road conditions, as do pedestrians, as do seniors and those with mobility issues, as do motorists. We must all share this space, and the City needs to be more aggressive in raising awareness of the importance of being mindful of all others on these public spaces.
Ben Simon
Strongly Support
We need to start making sure that our sidewalks are for walking! Not cycling and especially not for riding those horrible motor scooters which could easily kill someone. I think we can encourage this by both having some kind legal disincentive for those that break this law but also create safer road conditions for cycling, skating, etc. which will hopefully mean fewer people will ride on the sidewalk.
Jivan Sobrinho-Wheeler
Strongly Support
Cambridge recently experienced a car-related fatality with a senior pedestrian. Walkability and traffic calming are critical for safety and quality of life for seniors, people with disabilities, and residents who can’t afford a car in our city. Our safe streets efforts should include infrastructure improvements and municipal sidewalk snow removal. Seniors, people with disabilities, and others who are likely to be particularly vulnerable as pedestrians should be deeply involved in safe-streets redesigns.
Nicola Williams
Strongly Support
We need to start thinking about how our city can invest in universal design to not only help seniors feel comfortable and capable of moving through their community, but people with disabilities. We could implement a disparity study of our streets, which would be deemed difficult to traverse or inaccessible to these communities, look for green solutions around these issues, and set goals based on the report.
Quinton Zondervan
Strongly Support
More traffic calming measures, on demand light controlled crosswalks, road diets, sidewalk improvements, neighborways and car free zones, among others. I met with a senior who lives in public housing on Memorial Drive who told me that pedestrian conditions are so bad that those with disabilities must go a different way to the more expensive grocery store (Whole Foods) rather than the shorter walk to the more affordable store (Trader Joes). This is unacceptable and I am fighting for improvements as part of the upcoming Mem Drive redesign.
5. Do you support the restriction of on-street parking during rush hour in order to create dedicated bus lanes on certain major thoroughfares where bus riders experience significant delays due to traffic congestion?
Burhan Azeem
Strongly Support
Dennis Carlone
Strongly Support
Charles Franklin
Somewhat Support
Yes, as long as we pick the right streets to apply this to.There are many streets where this would work well. Mt. Auburn St. now has a fairly long dedicated bus lane that in my view has been a success. My hometown D.C. has rules that disallow parking during rush hour, similar to those on Memorial Drive by Harvard. It largely works, but can be confusing when not done with care.
Craig Kelley
Somewhat Support
Where the creation of these lanes would not be dangerous, it makes sense to me. In fairness to businesses and clients who might be impacted by these new restrictions, we should review nearby onstreet parking on side streets so that the Mom taking her young kids to the dentist for a 7:30 AM appointment before work can still get there. While parking spaces should not dictate our traffic and development programs, we cannot operate as if parking is a resource that has become irrelevant, a fact that is reflected in all of the parking spaces reserved specifically for City staff and City Councilors.
Derek Kopon
Somewhat Support
I believe that dedicated rush hour bus lanes, such as what has been implemented along Washington Street in Roslindale, can have a significant positive impact for those using mass transit and in encouraging others to switch to mass transit from personal vehicles. My concern is that, as this model seeks to be expanded, the city takes care to engage and provide parking options for those who otherwise would have their vehicles in those lanes - so that they may have the least disruption to their quality of life as possible.
Alanna Mallon
Strongly Support
Marc McGovern
Strongly Support
We have to make public transit more efficient if we want people to use it. I think the least we can do is restrict on-street parking during rush hour along our major corridors.
Jeffery McNary
Strongly Support
Adriane Musgrave
Strongly Support
Patty Nolan
Strongly Support
This idea works well in parts of other cities - including nearby Boston which has a few streets so designated. Cambridge has only part of Memorial Drive and the city doesn't control that. The faster buses can move, the more people will use them - IF they are frequent enough.
John Pitkin
Strongly Support
Sumbul Siddiqui
Somewhat Support
Allowing for priority access for buses during rush hour would increase reliability but I think we have to work the MBTA more closely because even with dedicated bus lanes, other issues may come up. Additionally, we have some squares where on-street parking is critical for local businesses, so we must take that into account.
E. Denise Simmons
Neither Support nor Oppose
I support the concept of this, but I would need more information on how this might be implemented and what potential unintended consequences might be. I would like to explore this more, though, and would welcome being provided more information.
Ben Simon
Strongly Support
Jivan Sobrinho-Wheeler
Strongly Support
Yes, as traffic studies have made clear, there are some streets where the majority of rush hour commuters are travelling by bus, but those buses often get delayed in traffic. Bus-only lanes will encourage more people to take public transit by reducing the amount of time buses are stuck in traffic and improving commute times.
Nicola Williams
Strongly Support
Quinton Zondervan
Strongly Support
6. Do you support exploring new ways of raising revenue to provide Boston with more tools to improve conditions for people walking, using mobility assistive devices, biking, and using public transit (e.g. increasing the gas tax, implementing congestion pricing, increasing fees on Uber/Lyft)? If yes, please give examples that interest you.
Burhan Azeem
Strongly Support
Dennis Carlone
Strongly Support
Increasing Lyft/Uber fees, increasing the gas tax, adding congestion pricing - but ensuring these taxes only apply to those who can afford them. I want to ensure we raise revenue via these measures but not disproportionately affect low income and working-poor residents.
Charles Franklin
Strongly Support
We absolutely need to explore finding new ways to fund and encourage sustainable and accessible modes of transportation. I’m a strong believer in taxing behaviors that cause significant negative externalities. Uber and Lyft are a good example. There is a state fee for this that goes towards supporting the taxi industry. I’d like to see it used to support alternative transportation. I'm also in favor of raising the excise tax on cars. I am wary of increasing the cost of any particular mode of transportation without mitigating the possible effects on working and low-income families.
Craig Kelley
Strongly Support
While I strongly support congestion pricing, an increased gas tax, higher parking sticker fees and, especially, an increase in TNC ride pickup fees, the City does not need to raise fees in order to spend more money on its transportation safety programs. We have plenty of money for enhanced traffic enforcement efforts, more effective safety education outreach, improved street maintenance and more, we’re just choosing not to currently spend it. We should also charge delivery vehicles like UPS for curb access, as that regularly blocks both our streets and sidewalks.
Derek Kopon
Strongly Support
If there is a way to effectively implement congestion pricing, then I think that would be appropriate. While I do support increasing the gas tax, any significant increase in the gas tax probably must be a statewide effort. If we only increase a gas tax here in Cambridge, this is simply an arbitrage opportunity and a boon to gas stations in Somerville.
Alanna Mallon
Strongly Support
I support a variety of new ways to raise revenue for public transit, including congestion prices and extra fees on ridehailing services.
Marc McGovern
Strongly Support
Although I don't think revenue is our biggest problem, I think we need to look at various ways to raise additional funds, not just in Cambridge but as a State. I supported the gas tax and think it is a fair way to raise money to address various transportation issues. I have also been outspoken about the need to invest significant dollars to improve our public transit system and to think regionally. I support high speed rail, and the North-South Connector.
Jeffery McNary
Strongly Support
gas tax
Adriane Musgrave
Strongly Support
As part of the #UnfairHikes rally, I supported several options to raise revenue, including increasing the gas tax by 3 cent per gallon, adopting congestion pricing on major roadways, and increasing the fees on Uber/Lyft. I would be open to considering other proposals as well. In Cambridge, I don't think that revenue is the main barrier to getting more protective bike lanes built or creating safer crosswalks. Though if I find that it is, I would also be open to other revenue-generating options.
Patty Nolan
Strongly Support
Honestly, for both providing revenue and environmental reasons, I have long advocated and supported a doubling of the gas tax - or even tripling, so it approaches Europe prices. cars would and should be smaller and more efficient if we did that. Note that is why I belong to Better World Club and NOT the AAA, since BWC lobbies for higher efficiency standards, and includes bike help along with car help if you break down on the road.
John Pitkin
Strongly Support
Some form of congestion pricing and increased fees on Uber/Lyft, but ONLY for public transit, which should be prioritized. Once public transit becomes the norm, that will free up space on streets for other non-car modes.
Sumbul Siddiqui
Strongly Support
Examples include requiring developers to pay into a trust designed to improve the infrastructure for pedestrians, cyclists and ride-sharing programs as part of any zoning request; Congestion pricing in certain areas of the city, such as Alewife, and adjusting the annual fee for residential parking permits to one which is based on income.
E. Denise Simmons
Strongly Support
I would be open to exploring increasing the gas tax, implementing congestion, or increasing fees on the TNCs.
Ben Simon
Strongly Support
We desperately need to raise revenue but we should be doing it by taxing the rich. I am concerned that gas taxes and congestion pricing are regressive taxes and inordinately burden poor and working class people. They may need to drive because they have been displaced from their communities through gentrification and/or because our public transportation system is poor and shuts down before many working class people are done with work, such as people who work in bars.
Jivan Sobrinho-Wheeler
Strongly Support
Yes, congestion pricing, especially in the most traffic-heavy areas of the city, is a great way to reduce traffic and generate revenue to improve public transit and mobility. Fees for parking and on Uber and Lyft are another way to both generate revenue for public transit and encourage people to take it. I also believe we should design these revenue generation opportunities to be progressive. We have the data on cars on drivers to ensure wealthier drivers are paying more in congestion-pricing than poor drivers to make the system fair.
Nicola Williams
Strongly Support
I am interested in the proposal by Winthrop Senator Joe Boncore and Brighton Rep. Michael Moran to tax ride-sharing companies for distances their vehicles travel without passengers. Their bill would specifically prohibit companies like Uber and Lyft from charging drivers or riders for these increased prices. I'd like to support these efforts as a city councillor.
Quinton Zondervan
Strongly Support
I’m interested in all of the above as explained earlier. I’m also a proponent of equitably increasing the gas tax at the state level and I’ve been working on an equitable carbon tax for the past 6 years through the Climate Action Business Association (CABA, now part of Climate XChange), which I co-founded to take action on climate change and to help transform our transportation sector to more sustainable transit modes.
7. Do you support the rollout of dynamic parking meter pricing in business districts, which would increase meter rates during periods of increased demand, to free up on-street parking and reduce cars “cruising” for open spaces?
Burhan Azeem
Strongly Support
Dennis Carlone
Strongly Support
Charles Franklin
Somewhat Support
I am in favor of this, so long as it actually frees up on-street parking and reduces “cruising” as a result. We would have to tweak the price changes so as to have the desired effect. I don’t want to see the city implement such a scheme with little or no effect on on-street parking. Another side-effect I’m concerned about is that dynamic meter pricing may push people to shop larger businesses with large parking lots and hurt our local businesses. We should study how to mitigate these effects before putting such a plan into action.
Craig Kelley
Strongly Support
Parking as a resource must be better managed, including better pricing and replacing on-street car parking with suitable bike and ‘bike like’ parking such as scooters and motorcycles to help free up sidewalks for pedestrians. The absolute dominance of cars is changing but the City needs to do a much, much, better job of understanding this change and helping our business and other communities understand, based on data not anecdotes, how we can most successfully move into a less car-dependent future. Simply telling a business owner that things will be okay when parking is removed is not enough.
Derek Kopon
Strongly Support
Yes, a dynamic pricing model can be tuned to achieve a certain desired vacancy on-street parking percentage. This is a boon to local business as well, as it makes it easier for people to park if they know there is a good chance to find on-street parking, even if they have to pay a little bit more for it.
Alanna Mallon
Somewhat Oppose
Our small businesses are already struggling in a difficult retail environment, and their employees - who are often from out of town, as they cannot afford to live in Cambridge - are already the ones who are most struggling with being able to commute to work and park. Discouraging potential customers from parking near local businesses by raising prices will only cause those customers to frequent large chain stores with plenty of (free) parking instead, hurting our small business owners.
Marc McGovern
Strongly Support
Jeffery McNary
Somewhat Support
Adriane Musgrave
Strongly Support
Patty Nolan
Strongly Support
I also support congestion pricing - for major roads like the turnpike and figuring out how to do it on major city roads into and out of Cambridge - and Boston and other cities with traffic nightmares.
John Pitkin
Neither Support nor Oppose
I could be persuaded to support but want to know more.
Sumbul Siddiqui
Strongly Support
I would want to be careful about increasing the prices during high-volume hours when lower income employees may need to drive to work, such as before and during nighttime shifts on weekends in neighborhoods with restaurants.
E. Denise Simmons
Strongly Support
I am interested in exploring this further; I would want to know what impact this might have on the less affluent before I could fully embrace this. I would not wish to implement a system where very wealthy people can afford parking spaces in our most popular locations, and the less fortunate would essentially be discouraged from similar participation.
Ben Simon
Neither Support nor Oppose
I have a less strong take on this as I'm not as clear on how exactly it would work, but I am concerned that it may be regressive for the same reasons I listed in question 6 above.
Jivan Sobrinho-Wheeler
Strongly Support
Nicola Williams
Strongly Support
Quinton Zondervan
Strongly Support
8. Do you support raising the annual fee for residential parking permits?
Burhan Azeem
Strongly Support
Dennis Carlone
Strongly Support
Charles Franklin
Somewhat Support
Yes, but we have to do it carefully. If we don’t raise the annual fee enough much, then the price will not have the desired effect on reducing parking use. If we raise it too high, it may place a significant burden on low-income households that rely on their car for work, etc. On the other hand, raising the annual fee may not have much of an effect on reducing parking use. My understanding is that the city issues less permits every year.
Craig Kelley
Strongly Support
My wife and I have not owned a car for over a decade and every year my family has subsidized parking stickers for people who do own cars because the program does not charge enough for stickers to even cover its operating cost. That is absolutely crazy and unfair. The City should, at minimum, at least charge enough for parking stickers to cover the cost of the program.
Derek Kopon
Somewhat Support
I support a gradual increase in the residential parking permit as street space is a valuable and scarce resource that should be priced accordingly. However, we also must be mindful that, as much as we love our bikes, some members of our community such as the elderly, those with disabilities, families with small children, etc. will require a car to get around. I favor a two-tiered parking permit pricing model with lower fees for residents who are driving hybrid or electric vehicles and higher fees for those driving less fuel-efficient cars.
Alanna Mallon
Strongly Oppose
Raising the fees for parking permits will not actually change anyone’s behavior or discourage residents from owning cars. This will only hurt lower income people as another instance of being burdened by unnecessary fees, and those who would be able to absorb a parking fee increase likely have private driveways anyway. I would be in support of a tiered fee structure, which would keep parking fees stable but charge more for each car owned/permitted.
Marc McGovern
Somewhat Support
Although I believe that $25 for the year is way too low for most people, I would want to ensure that there are measures in place to support our seniors and low income residents.
Jeffery McNary
Somewhat Oppose
Adriane Musgrave
Strongly Support
Patty Nolan
Strongly Support
I support the fee to be doubled - AND provide an exception for low income residents.
John Pitkin
Strongly Support
Sumbul Siddiqui
Strongly Support
As long as it is mean tested.
E. Denise Simmons
Somewhat Support
I could support this, provided that we explore carve-outs for those who meet some sort of criteria proving that they are less affluent and would be unfairly penalized. For example, if an individual were receiving SNAP benefits or lived in subsidized housing.
Ben Simon
Neither Support nor Oppose
See explanation for question 6
Jivan Sobrinho-Wheeler
Strongly Support
Yes, and the annual fee for residential parking permits should be progressive, with well-off residents paying more for parking permits than lower-income Cantabrigians. As an example, a BMW owner should probably pay more for a permit than the owner of an old Dodge Dart.
Nicola Williams
Some
Quinton Zondervan
Strongly Support
I strongly advocated for this, successfully about 10 years ago, less successfully last year on the council. But I will continue to push for this.
9. Do you support eliminating requirements for a minimum number of parking spaces for new development?
Burhan Azeem
Strongly Support
Dennis Carlone
Strongly Support
I am 100% in support of this.
Charles Franklin
Strongly Support
Absolutely. Having this requirement encourages people to bring their cars when they move to the city. Which is to say nothing about the difficulties it poses to building new housing to ease the pressure on our housing market. It is also my understanding that many of the spaces associated with new development are going unused. These spaces could be put to better use as housing or as green space.
Craig Kelley
Somewhat Support
An absolute elimination of required parking spaces for new development may have the unintended consequence of making those buildings less accessible for people with mobility challenges, perhaps even to the extent of violating the ADA. With the caveat that enough spaces be required to meet the needs of people with various mobility constraints, I favor eliminating parking requirements. As our shared transportation economy expands, in part because of zoning I have introduced (hopefully it will pass), personal cars will become less of a thing and we should start planning for that future now.
Derek Kopon
Somewhat Oppose
While I sympathize with the ethos behind this suggestion (and I do not own a car myself), the reality is that a certain percentage of residents in our community need a car to get around (the elderly, those with disabilities, families with small children, etc.). If we don't build parking in new developments, these people will park on the street and this will make it harder to put in more bike lanes. I also note that many real estate developers champion getting rid of minimum parking requirements in order to increase their profit margins. I prefer that we do not cut corners on development.
Alanna Mallon
Somewhat Support
Most parking spaces in new developments go unused, but we still must be ADA compliant and aware of the transit amenities, or lack thereof, around each project
Marc McGovern
Strongly Support
A recent study showed that 30% of the required parking spaces in new developments go unused. We see that in the parking garages in many developments in Cambridge. By eliminating parking requirements we can not only cut down on cost (money that I would want to see redirected to more affordable housing) but we would decrease car ownership, particularly in developments near public transit.
Jeffery McNary
Somewhat Support
Adriane Musgrave
Strongly Support
Patty Nolan
Somewhat Support
I support a reduction - However, honestly, I am not sure if it should be completely eliminated for ALL developments. . It depends on the development - whether it is for low income residents, and whether it is near enough to public transit.
John Pitkin
Somewhat Oppose
Reduce, yes, eliminate, no.
Sumbul Siddiqui
Somewhat Support
E. Denise Simmons
Strongly Support
Ben Simon
Strongly Opposed
I am committed to a car-free future, I am also passionate about fighting gentrification and displacement. I was priced out of Cambridge as a kid when my family was evicted from our home of almost thirty years so a developer could turn it into luxury apartments. Parking requirements are sometimes a means of holding back horrible developments that would otherwise be built and displace who knows how many hundreds of people. The Sullivan Courthouse is an excellent example of just that. It would have already been privatized and turned into a luxury office tower were it not for parking requirements.
Jivan Sobrinho-Wheeler
Strongly Support
Yes, as a recent MAPC study made clear, many parking spots in developments aren’t even being used, and we shouldn’t be requiring their creation as a city. The average cost to build a parking spot is $15,000 and much of the money and space used in their creation could be going towards affordable housing or green space instead.
Nicola Williams
Strongly Support
I support the reduction of this number rather than the elimination of any parking. We shouldn't spend money on cars that don't exist and incentivize people that don't need them to buy them.
Quinton Zondervan
Strongly Support
I’m consistently pushing for the elimination of parking minimums and I seem to be making some headway on this with staff.
10. Do you support reducing or eliminating MBTA fares for people with low income?
Burhan Azeem
Strongly Support
Dennis Carlone
Strongly Support
Transit should be free and accessible for all.
Charles Franklin
Strongly Support
I think public transportation should be free for everyone. Short of that, we should reduce or eliminate fares for low income families. I am in favor of putting pressure on the MBTA to do so, and if that doesn’t work, having the city provide funds to subsidize fares for those who need them most.
Craig Kelley
Strongly Support
Equity in transportation, to include both physical and economic access, is crucial to an equitable society. I can't say what the exact pricing formula should be or exactly what types of transportation subsidies should be provided to low income residents (for example, many low income workers commute at least one way at times when the T is not running so a TNC subsidy may be relevant for them), but helping ensure transportation costs do not keep people from participating in all that our region has to offer seems fair, though finding the funding streams for the subsidies will be complicated.
Derek Kopon
Strongly Support
Alanna Mallon
Strongly Support
Raise taxes. Make the T free.
Marc McGovern
Strongly Support
I worked on this issue as it pertains to low income students at Cambridge Rindge and Latin School.
Jeffery McNary
Strongly Support
Adriane Musgrave
Strongly Support
Patty Nolan
Strongly Support
While I am not sure I support completely free MBTA for all, I support a reduction for all, and elimination or drastic reduction for all students. We subsidize roads for cars by devoting a large amount of dollars maintaining roads used mostly by private vehicles - we should subsidize public transit even more, since it is healthier AND better to address the climate crisis.
John Pitkin
Somewhat Oppose
This would be difficult to administer. Let's just keep fares low for everyone.
Sumbul Siddiqui
Strongly Support
E. Denise Simmons
Strongly Support
Ben Simon
Strongly Support
I think the T should be free for everyone.
Jivan Sobrinho-Wheeler
Strongly Support
Yes, and our campaign supports eliminating fares for ALL people. Public transit is a public good like public libraries and public schools, and it should be available for all residents for free at the point of service. We’ll be releasing a policy paper on the costs of making public transit free for Cambridge residents, how the program will work, and how the City can pay for it in the coming weeks. Cambridge has the means to lead a movement for public transit among US cities—we just need the political will to make it happen.
Nicola Williams
Strongly Support
Quinton Zondervan
Strongly Support
Yes, in fact I think MBTA bus and subway rides should be free for all riders, paid for through taxes and fees as per previous answers.