Boston City Councilor District 9

Incumbents are indicated with *

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About the Candidate

Policy Proposals

Additional Questions

Jonathan Lamar Allen
(pdf of answers)

Brandon Bowser
(pdf of answers)

Elizabeth Breadon
(pdf of answers)

Craig Cashman
(pdf of answers)

Daniel Daly
(no answers submitted)

Amanda Smart
(pdf of answers)

About the Candidate

1. How do you move around your community and get to where you need to go?

2. What is a particularly dangerous problem or location in your community for people walking, biking, taking transit, or for people with disabilities that you'd like to see addressed?

3. Why do you think people who care about walking, biking, transit, and mobility issues should vote for you?

Jonathan Allen

I primarily use public transportation.

Brighton & Commonwealth Avenues are really congested streets that pose a significant threat to the lives of people with disabilities, walkers, bikers, and transit riders.

Not only are the interests of people who care about walking, biking, transit and mobility important to me from a safety and accessibility perspective, but also from a environmental standpoint. We need to priorities alternative modes of transportation and infrastructure to reduce carbon emissions and decrease congestion. As a young and inclusive public servant, I am committed to pushing us towards innovative, equitable, and sustainable solutions that ensure residents are able to travel in our city without regard to socio-economic status.

Brandon Bowser

I am a year-round cyclist. I also walk and take the T. I’ve been car-free since 2010, and navigating the city outside of a car has allowed me to connect more with the community around me. I often see former and current students and their families while I’m biking around Allston-Brighton.

Union Square in Allston is a mess and is extremely difficult to cross as a pedestrian. It’s nearly impossible for anyone with mobility issues. Market Street in Brighton needs traffic calming, as it’s very dangerous for those on bikes, and Cleveland Circle is precarious for all road users.

It’s not lip service to me. As a cyclist, I understand the issues first-hand; it’s not an abstraction. We deserve elected officials with first hand experience navigating the city outside of a vehicle. I have been fortunate to have worked for 9 years as a pedicab driver at Boston Pedicab. I know full well the reality of cycling around the city for pleasure, profession, and as a means of commute.

Elizabeth Breadon

Walk, 57 bus and T, driver hybrid vehicle

There are no crosswalks on Washington Street between Oak Square and Langley. This is a disaster in the making. Bike/Bus lanes are needed for all major roads and bikes lanes where there are no buses. Crosswalks on main streets are not shoveled after snow making it impossible or treacherous for people in wheelchair or using crutches or cane. The B Line is so slow that people use uber et al instead. Consolidating some of its many stops will help.

Of all the Allston Brighton candidates I was the only one who worked with AB Health Collaborative on establishing the Brighton Avenue Bus Lane. I have also called Boston Transportation Dept about monitoring/ticketing/towing cars that park in this lane. Having been a physical therapist for people with disabilities for most of my career I am especially sensitive to mobility challenges and potential fixes. I am also an abiding environmentalist and will do all I can to improve public transportation and bicycle safety to take as many cars as possible off our roads.

Craig Cashman

Despite having to young children my wife and I downsized to one car two years ago. Before I began running for this seat, I either walked or biked to Boston Landing and used the commuter rail to get downtown for work.

Oak Square is particularly dangerous place to cross with difficult visibility because of illegally parked cars/trucks and to so many points on entry into the intersection. I would like to see more Crosswalk warning systems in areas around the neighborhood. While work has been done, we need to continue to make ADA accessible improvements to pedestrian ramps on sidewalks in our neighborhood and we need to begin to invest in raised crossings to improve safety but also sow down traffic.

I have first hand experience working on transportation issues in this neighborhood. I took part in the early meetings where the idea of commuter rail service at Boston Landing were discussed and got to see it become a reality. I got to write a letter with my colleagues at the State House advocating for West Station now and not 2040, while also calling for Harvard University to make a significant investment towards construction. I intend to build upon Harvard's investment of $58M by pushing more public-private partnership with other institutions, Kendall Square and the Longwood medical area.

Lee Nave

Getting to and from my office downtown, I take the B-branch of the Green Line or bike down Comm Ave. When doing errands and picking up groceries in Allston/Brighton I will bike in all conditions except icy, snowy weather. If I have to get across town I’ll take public transit, primarily the 66 bus.

We have several intersections that pose major risks for community members. One such intersection is the corner of Commonwealth and Warren/Kelton Streets, which is where I live. There are two service roads, a main road, as well as the GreenLine in the center of the road. The intersection is extremely confusing for drivers, pedestrians, and cyclists. Each day, it is frequented by young people attending Brighton High and Green Academy, commuters heading into the city for work, and elders out on errands. I would like to see improved light signals and maintenance, clearer signage and road markings.

I have experience working on major policy reform. I also am an active walker, biker, and MBTA user. I know first hand the importance of improving our intersections for commuters as well as ensuring we have a stable and equitable public transportation system. I will work with MassBikes, The Allston Brighton Mobility group, and the MBTA on strategic frameworks over the next few years. I will convene additional community mobility studies marketed to ensure as many community members weigh in on decisions of how this neighborhood's transportation network should function.

Amanda Smart

I use public transportation, and taxis.

I have had a running club speak to me about how drivers do not acknowledge people crossing at crosswalks. I have noticed this when walking with individuals with canes or in wheelchairs.

I believe that people should vote for me because I have a wide range of experiences dealing with Public Transportation, and know from experience the difficulty some handicapped individuals have when attempting to be independent.

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Policy Proposals

1. How will you ensure implementation of the infrastructure changes needed to slow traffic on your community's streets, and improve crosswalks and intersections to make them safer for people who are walking and using mobility assistive devices?

2. How will you improve the reach, frequency, and quality of public transit in Boston?

3. How will you ensure fast-tracked implementation of a city-wide network of off-street paths and protected bike lanes on major thoroughfares and connecting streets that are safe and comfortable for people of all ages and abilities?

Jonathan Allen

Allston-Brighton is home to the first Bus/Bike Only lane in the City of Boston! This infrastructure change is the result of multiple community partners coming together to advocate and develop safer designs for traffic feasibility and mobility. I am committed to supporting efforts to expand more Bus/Bike Only lanes. I will work with stakeholders like Vision Zero Coalition, MBTA, Liveable Streets, CommonWheels, other elected officials, City/State agencies, and the Mayor to ensure that constituents' feedback is heard and prioritized in decision-making processes. Representation is key. I will work to ensure equitable representation of constituents' views, experiences, and aspirations.

I will work to enhance the amount of constituent feedback received to collect more data assessing the needs regarding reach, frequency, and quality of public transit in Boston. Also, as a fellow MBTA customer, I will advocate for a more customer-centered approach to addressing and enhancing the public transit experience. My advocacy extends to ensuring public transit scheduling and design adequately responds to disproportionate accessibility, affordability, and reliability.

Coalition building! I will work with community stakeholders to determine the best design for off-street paths and protected bike lanes. Also, to move forward more efficiently, I will bring partners together to mobilize our community so that we are able to apply pressure where necessary to raise awareness about the importance of off-street paths and protected bike lanes.

Brandon Bowser

I will support dramatically expanding and fast-tracking the Neighborhood Slow Streets program. District 9 is one of the few areas in the city that hasn’t been selected for this safe-streets program despite pressing need, especially considering the potential for increased cut-through traffic during the Allston I-90 construction. I will advocate for the rapid implementation of the North Allston Safe Streets Zone and beyond. If we’re going to tackle the lionshare of serious injuries and fatalities in our city, we’ll need to speed up implementation of street redesigns on major roadways like Comm Ave, Cambridge St, Harvard Ave, North Harvard St, Western Ave, and Chestnut Hill Ave - all of which have had a high rate of bike and pedestrian crashes in Boston. Last year, an 80-year-old was killed mid-crosswalk in a crash while crossing Comm Ave by Griggs St. These roads need to be redeveloped with the user experience in mind -- the current BU/Comm Ave situation, for example, has made it more difficult for riders during this extended construction phase. Implementing temporary fixes first with paint, flexposts, traffic signal changes, and new signage has been successful in New York.

My prime concern with public transit in Boston is equitability and quality of access. A low-cost, quick, and effective change we can make as a city is to increase the use of bus-and-bike-only lanes. More than a third of Allston-Brighton residents rely on MBTA buses to navigate the city. I support the bus lane on Brighton Avenue and will push BTD to implement more in Allston-Brighton. Bus-only lanes decrease commute times for bus riders. I will also work with the MBTA and the community to increase and improve bus shelters, particularly in areas where the mobility-impaired often wait for buses. The Allston I-90 construction project must be used as an opportunity to not only improve commutes, but an opportunity to increase the quality of life for those living close to the Mass Pike. I will be a staunch advocate for building West Station early in the I-90 Allston Interchange project. I will push MassDOT and the MBTA to increase frequency of commuter rail service. It is also the perfect opportunity to electrify our commuter rail and introduce EMUs. Implementing bus-only lanes with connections to destinations downtown, Back Bay, Cambridge, and the Longwood Medical Area.

As a person who relies upon a bike to get around A-B and the city, I strongly support the rapid implementation of protected bike lanes. In talking with community members, students, and friends, I know that there is a huge demand for improved biking infrastructure in Boston, and traffic safety is one of the leading reasons why people don’t bike today. A-B, with its already above average rates of biking, is a critical place to invest in these improvements. I will: 1.) I will lobby BTD for developing networks - not just stand-alone corridors - that take people to and from popular and well-established biking routes like those along the Charles River or on the soon-to-be-completed Comm Ave section by BU. 2.) Push for community outreach that reflects the mobility needs of A-B. We need to be doing everything we can to receive feedback from people who are using our streets daily. I will advocate for the creation of more public outreach positions in BTD to make this possible to ensure our community is heard.

Elizabeth Breadon

The Brighton Ave Bus lane started with a group of dedicated volunteers gathering data. My initial steps would be gathering information by holding town hall meetings on transportation, sending a Survey Monkey questionnaire to residents, asking on Twitter and Facebook, meeting with D9 BPD and BTD, asking school crossing teams and making sure residents know to call my office to report issues. Then I would work with Public Works on a priority list and schedule for short term fixes and capital repairs that need to go into the budget. Allston-Brighton has been out-of-sight and out-of-mind- for too long at City Hall.

First, I will ride every bus and T line I Allston Brighton, although I already have. Then, I'll collaborate with other members of the Council to publicize to problems and request upgrades in service. I will also collaborate with the Boston delegation and communicate specific needs and potential dangers to leadership at the State House and urge constituents to do the same. I believe that many squeaky wheels will get the grease.

I think the most effective way of accomplishing these goals is for members of the Council to work together, rather than negotiating deals for their own areas, and to enlist the mayor and the heads of Parks and Environmental Dept. I would enlist public support by asking that each BPS high school take part in designing and recommending where paths and bike lanes could go. I would use their work as part of a public relations campaign for the project.

Craig Cashman

Boston needs to begin implementing raised crossings to improve safety for pedestrians in the city of Boston but also to slow down traffic on neighborhood streets. A Raised crossing will slow down traffic on Kenrick Street at the entrance to Chandler's pond where there is currently no safe place to cross between the Newton town line and Lake Street. The rampant cut through traffic on Portsmouth St. will be slowed with a raised crossing from Waverly Apartments to the Portsmouth Street Playground. We also need to implement more pedestrian crosswalk warning systems like the one at Hano St. and Cambridge St. near the the Union Square Fire Station. This was put in place after the death of a 12 year-old BPS student and we should not wait for another tragedy to mobilize and realize these improvement. There are feature we need for improved safety for all.

I will always be an advocate for bringing Boston's public transit into the 21st century. We need to invest in electrifying the commuter rail, expand this service to more areas and increasing the frequency on these lines. This will relieve some of the stress put on our dated subway system, our buses and our congested roadways. I will work with state officials and be a vocal supporter of public transit in City Hall. We can no longer turn a blind eye to the MBTAs increasing issues and need to continue to be proactive when coming up with the necessary solutions. Locally we can also continue to push public-private partnership by pushing for increased shuttle service among the development community. If developer is going to promote a project as transit oriented they should be prepared to make significant investment locally in public transit.

I will continue the already on-going collaboration with mobility activists in city hall and always work to champion these improvements across multiple city agencies. As the city, but Allston Brighton in particular, moves through the current wave of development we need to call upon this community to make a significant investment in these types of infrastructure features. We need to build infrastructure for future and that begins with thoughtful and comprehensive planning.

Lee Nave

I will ensure full funding for all neighborhoods seeking to implement a slow-streets program. We must invest more than $5 per person on safe streets infrastructure, policies, and enforcement. If Boston is serious about saving lives and improving transit conditions, then they will fully implement Vision Zero’s priorities. In addition, I would work with the Public Works Department to improve the use of the 311 service to report such infrastructure needs. Following infrastructure requests, I would implement standard response times to such submissions regarding crosswalks, stoplight outages, and broken sidewalks, that impact our residents’ mobility. We have residents utilizing the systems that do not respond in a timely fashion.

With all the new development in Allston-Brighton, we need to ensure each project has a complete MBTA plan formed before the project is developed. We have several major projects such as the Allston Yards project that will change the very landscape of our community. Though this particular project is adjacent to the MBTA Boston Landing commuter rail station, we have already witnessed this train being over-capacity during rush hour traffic. Adding potentially another thousand commuters would overburden this station. Therefore, we need to increase the number of cars and frequency of commuter rail trains coming through Boston Landing, as well as look at an additional station such as West Station to help relieve this burden. We will need to have more buses around the community that are reliably frequent during peak hours to take residents nearby to the station. We also need to have a slightly closer, and regularly re-stocked, BlueBike stations for the “last-mile” riders. Our objective would be to have as many alternatives to parking and driving as possible because already streets like Everett and North Beacon, see massive congestion.

As a Program Manager with a statewide advocacy organization, I know what it takes to work in collaboration with different stakeholders to push for progressive change. In order to build comprehensive active transit infrastructure across the city and into neighboring municipalities, I will take a strong stance for prioritizing the city-wide network for bicyclists. I will lean on the grassroots efforts of MassBike, Boston Cyclists Union, LiveableStreets and others to provide data and stories, which amplify community voice on a city level, while also working within the City Council’s Committees (Planning, Development, & Transportation and Environment, Sustainability & Parks) and with city departments and executives, like the Chief of Streets, to build internal support and efficiency in implementing plans.

Amanda Smart

I would seek the assistance of city individuals, and people who live with these devices. They have more knowledge of the challenges they go through, then I do.

I will be a part of as many boards, and planning committees related to Public Transport as I can.

I would let them know how many different people this affects, and how city businesses, restaurants and stores miss out when we don't make public transportation a top priority.

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Additional Questions

Click on the categories below for the complete question asked. Click on any answer with a * for further explanation of the candidate's stance.

Do you support:

1. Vision Zero

1. Vision Zero is an approach which aims to eliminate traffic fatalities and serious injuries and has been adopted by Boston, Cambridge, and Somerville, and many other cities across the country. Do you support the principles of Vision Zero policies and funding for their rapid implementation?

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2. State law allowing automated enforcement

2. One key strategy that has been proven to effectively reduce speeding, improve safety, and remove racial bias in traffic enforcement in other states and countries is automated enforcement (i.e. speed cameras and red light cameras). Do you support S.1376, An Act relative to automated enforcement, which if passed would authorize cities and towns in Massachusetts to opt into the use of automated enforcement? To see the full text of the bill, visit malegislature.gov/Bills/191/S1376

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3. Bike Network Plan

3. Do you support the implementation of improved bike facilities identified in your community’s Bike Network Plan or do you support the creation of a Bike Network Plan if none already exists?

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4. Age-friendly walking conditions

4. Do you support creating age-friendly walking conditions in your community -- an issue raised by many seniors as critical to their ability to 'age in community'? If yes, how?

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(more below)

Jonathan Allen

Strongly Support

Strongly Support*

Jonathan Allen

I particularly support this Act because of its diligence in addressing racial bias in traffic enforcement.

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Strongly Support

Strongly Support*

Jonathan Allen

I believe bike lanes are one way that we free up the sidewalks so that those walking are not put in harms way. This positively benefits seniors.

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Brandon Bowser

Strongly Support*

Brandon Bowser

For the past few years, we’ve had a commitment to Vision Zero with not a lot of action. I’m serious about reducing traffic fatalities and will work with relevant agencies to fast-track solutions.

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Somewhat Support*

Brandon Bowser

I’m wary of facial recognition technology and where it’s taking our police forces. There is no place in society for racial bias by the police and we need better solutions for addressing this than technology. I am encouraged by the bold steps Somerville has taken to bar facial recognition in public spaces.

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Strongly Support*

Brandon Bowser

We’ve seen the damage done by long-term projects whose delayed implementation has actually made roads more dangerous (Comm Ave). As a cyclist, I’m extremely supportive of Better Bike Corridors to encourage mode shift away from single-occupant cars.

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Strongly Support*

Brandon Bowser

Making District 9 a more pleasant place to walk is not hard, it just requires someone with a plan and the motivation to organize the relevant parties to get it done. Increasing tree cover and adding benches would make walking and taking breaks more pleasant. Increasing the amount of time pedestrians have to cross streets is crucial to seniors’ safety, as is slowing traffic on neighborhood streets. Much of this could be accomplished by pushing for the completion of Neighborhood Slow Streets projects in Allston-Brighton.

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Elizabeth Breadon

Strongly Support

Strongly Support

Strongly Support

Strongly Support*


Elizabeth Breadon

Walk lights near senior housing should be slowed down in response to the Walk Button so seniors can safely cross a street. Faint crosswalks need repainting and portable Crosswalk signs should be placed in crosswalks on busy streets. BPD and BTD should be a presence and be willing to stop and cite drivers to drive through crosswalks while people are trying to cross. The Council should hold a hearing on this issue at which people can try to use crutches or a cane and get a sense of what it takes to cross Chestnut Hill Ave at Cleveland Circle, for example.

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Craig Cashman

Strongly Support*


Craig Cashman

I always advocate for these policies and will assist in finding additional funding at the state and federal level, but also call for more investment from the private sector.

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Strongly Support

Strongly Support

Strongly Support*

Craig Cashman

Assuring that our senior are able to age in community is something that is important to me because I have many senior family members in Allston Brighton. We have to assure that pedestrian infrastructure is adequate for the safety of all and this includes seniors.

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Lee Nave

Strongly Support

Somewhat Support*

Lee Nave

I agree that our streets must become safer for pedestrians. Reducing and enforcing the speed limit are critical to reach this goal. However, I would want to ensure that stored camera data is protected in the age of facial recognition software and privacy concerns.

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Strongly Support

Strongly Support*

Lee Nave

Allston/Brighton may be known for the many college students who make a home in our community while studying, but 13% of our neighborhood’s residents are over 65 and we have multiple retirement communities. I believe Boston should implement policies that would create mobility for all. I have studied the 8 80 Cities frameworks and know that investment in public spaces that are suitable for 8 year olds and 80 year olds, benefit all residents.

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Amanda Smart

Strongly Support

Strongly Support*

Amanda Smart

I have witnessed this in Italy, and have seen people that acknowledge it.

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Strongly Support

Strongly Support*

Amanda Smart

I would attempt to have walkways near nursing homes or hospitals.

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Do you support:

5. Restriction of parking for bus-only lanes

5. Do you support the restriction of on-street parking during rush hour in order to create dedicated bus lanes on certain major thoroughfares where bus riders experience significant delays due to traffic congestion?

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6. New revenue sources

6. Do you support exploring new ways of raising revenue to provide Boston with more tools to improve conditions for people walking, using mobility assistive devices, biking, and using public transit (e.g. increasing the gas tax, implementing congestion pricing, increasing fees on Uber/Lyft)? If yes, please give examples that interest you.

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7. Dynamic parking meter pricing

7. Do you support the rollout of dynamic parking meter pricing in business districts, which would increase meter rates during periods of increased demand, to free up on-street parking and reduce cars "cruising" for open spaces?

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8. Traffic signal timing that prioritizes people walking

8. Boston has many traffic signals that do not work well for pedestrians. Do you support making signal timing safer, easier, and more convenient for people walking and using mobility assistive devices at all paces?

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(more below)

Jonathan Allen

Strongly Support

Strongly Support*

Jonathan Allen

Gas tax and congestion pricing.

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Somewhat Support

Strongly Support

 

Brandon Bowser

Strongly Support*

Brandon Bowser

Though it didn’t necessitate the removal of on-street parking, I fully supported and still support the Brighton Avenue bus lane, and would support further efforts to decrease delays for bus riders even if it means that a few people can’t store their private property on a public roadway for a few hours.

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Strongly Support*

Brandon Bowser

"More than half of all 2017 ride-share trips in Massachusetts were in Boston alone, adding more congestion to our streets. I support An Act to Reduce Traffic Fatalities, and encourage shared rides, a bill that would empower municipalities to collect local taxes on trips in addition to state taxes. Under the proposed legislation, the municipalities in the MBTA service area could impose a congestion assessment of at most $2.25 per ride during regular MBTA service hours. This is one of many sensible ways to raise more revenue that can be invested in promoting walking, biking, and public transit."

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Somewhat Support*

Brandon Bowser

By and large the people who drive on a daily basis in the city of Boston are well above the city’s median income. If we are going to implement dynamic parking meter pricing across the city of Boston, I would love to see it done in a manner in which the money stays local and used specifically for that neighborhood. For example, street improvements like trees, trash cans, sidewalk repairs, and street-calming infrastructure.

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Strongly Support*

Brandon Bowser

"There are many intersections in District 9 that do not allow adequate time for street crossings. I look forward to working with the City to fix this. There is a high percentage of young people in our neighborhoods and we also have residents with visual impairment, who need safe, protected, and accessible crossing conditions. The RFB (rapid flash beacon) pedestrian signal on Cambridge Street by Union Square was installed after a child was killed walking across the street. We should look at where we need safer crossings and work to implement them."

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Elizabeth Breadon

Strongly Support*


Elizabeth Breadon

Yes, yes, a thousand times yes.

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Strongly Support*


Elizabeth Breadon

I am keenly aware of the thousands of drivers that come into Boston to work at large nonprofits that do not pay the relatively small Payment in Lieu of Taxes the City asks for. Also, institutions have fleets of cars, trucks and buses that are particularly hard on our roads. Thousands of drivers use Boston roads for medical appointments to come to museums or sporting events. Institutions collect a steady stream of money in their parking garages. I would explore many formulas for collecting money from all of them to improve Boston transit conditions.

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Strongly Support

Strongly Support

 

Craig Cashman

Strongly Support

Strongly Support

Strongly Support*

Craig Cashman

I would support dynamic meter pricing to free up spaces but we also need to implement "Parking Benefit Districts" in Boston to retain some of the revenue in the business districts. This revenue could be used to make necessary improvements in the area such a repainting bike/bus lanes/crosswalks or fixing damaged sidewalks.

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Strongly Support

 

Lee Nave

Somewhat Support*

Lee Nave

We have seen success already in the first week of having the Brighton Avenue bike lane in Allston, and I would hope to expand this to routes 64 and 27 as well as have a similar lane in the outbound direction along Brighton Ave.. It will significantly cut down on commute times and encourage ridership for both our buses and bikes.

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Strongly Support*

Lee Nave

Boston recently took first place for US city traffic in a study done by INRIX. In order to improve conditions for all who navigate the city, we must create funding streams to improve active transit infrastructure & public transportation to encourage people to leave their cars at home, or not buy one in the first place. In order to do so, I would support congestion pricing and work with other municipalities and the state legislature to effectively collect more toll revenue during rush hour.

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Strongly Support

Strongly Support

 

Amanda Smart

Strongly Support

Strongly Support*

Amanda Smart

increasing gas tax, and parking meters.

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Somewhat Support

Strongly Support

 

Do you support:

9. Charging for residential parking permits

9. Do you support charging an annual fee for residential parking permits?

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10. Reducing/ eliminating MBTA fares

10. Do you support reducing or eliminating MBTA fares for people with low income?

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11. Ensuring large-scale developments are walkable, resilient, green, and connected

11. Do you support ensuring large-scale developments (including Sullivan Square, the Allston I-90 Interchange, and Suffolk Downs) incorporate the community's desire for walkability, connectivity, open space, and resiliency?

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Jonathan Allen

Somewhat Support

Strongly Support

Strongly Support

   

Brandon Bowser

Somewhat Support

Strongly Support

Strongly Support*

Brandon Bowser

Developments should be based around multimodal mobility, not just car mobility. We should emphasize foot traffic so that people don’t have to drive around the corner to get a carton of milk.

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Elizabeth Breadon

Strongly Support*


Elizabeth Breadon

$25 per permit with exclusions for elderly and people with handicaps.

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Strongly Support*


Elizabeth Breadon

Reducing or eliminating MBTA fares for people with low incomes will help them get to and from work which helps them, employers, and the economy.

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Strongly Support*


Elizabeth Breadon

There should be no question about this in any large development.

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Craig Cashman

Somewhat Support*

Craig Cashman

The issue with resident parking from the beginning has been enforcement. From Cleveland Circle to Brighton Center municipal lots, you'll see cars parked for days with out of state plates. People who register their car in Boston and pay excise tax directly into the city coffers should be able to park on city streets and near their homes. What's not fair is getting permits for multiple cars and using streets as a personal parking garage. I would support imposing a modest permit fee for a second vehicle registered at a specific address and fees that escalates steeply for additional vehicles.

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Strongly Support*

Craig Cashman

I do not believe that now is the time to eliminate fares for riding the MBTA but would support fare reduction programs for certain communities in need.

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Strongly Support*

Craig Cashman

We need to assure that the "People's Path" becomes a reality and that the vision of the community is realized.

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Lee Nave

Strongly Support

Strongly Support

Strongly Support

   

Amanda Smart

Strongly Support

Strongly Support*

Amanda Smart

I support reducing, not eliminating.

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Strongly Support

   

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About the Candidate

1. How do you move around your community and get to where you need to go?
Jonathan Allen
I primarily use public transportation.
Brandon Bowser
"I am a year-round cyclist. I also walk and take the T. I’ve been car-free since 2010, and navigating the city outside of a car has allowed me to connect more with the community around me. I often see former and current students and their families while I’m biking around Allston-Brighton."
Elizabeth Breadon
Walk, 57 bus and T, driver hybrid vehicle
Craig Cashman
Despite having to young children my wife and I downsized to one car two years ago. Before I began running for this seat, I either walked or biked to Boston Landing and used the commuter rail to get downtown for work.
Lee Nave Jr.
"Getting to and from my office downtown, I take the B-branch of the Green Line or bike down Comm Ave. When doing errands and picking up groceries in Allston/Brighton I will bike in all conditions except icy, snowy weather. If I have to get across town I’ll take public transit, primarily the 66 bus."
Amanda Smart
I use public transportation, and taxis.
2. What is a particularly dangerous problem or location in your community for people walking, biking, taking transit, or for people with disabilities that you’d like to see addressed?
Jonathan Allen
Brighton & Commonwealth Avenues are really congested streets that pose a significant threat to the lives of people with disabilities, walkers, bikers, and transit riders.
Brandon Bowser
Union Square in Allston is a mess and is extremely difficult to cross as a pedestrian. It’s nearly impossible for anyone with mobility issues. Market Street in Brighton needs traffic calming, as it’s very dangerous for those on bikes, and Cleveland Circle is precarious for all road users.
Elizabeth Breadon
There are no crosswalks on Washington Street between Oak Square and Langley. This is a disaster in the making. Bike/Bus lanes are needed for all major roads and bikes lanes where there are no buses. Crosswalks on main streets are not shoveled after snow making it impossible or treacherous for people in wheelchair or using crutches or cane. The B Line is so slow that people use uber et al instead. Consolidating some of its many stops will help.
Craig Cashman
Oak Square is particularly dangerous place to cross with difficult visibility because of illegally parked cars/trucks and to so many points on entry into the intersection. I would like to see more Crosswalk warning systems in areas around the neighborhood. While work has been done, we need to continue to make ADA accessible improvements to pedestrian ramps on sidewalks in our neighborhood and we need to begin to invest in raised crossings to improve safety but also sow down traffic.
Lee Nave Jr.
We have several intersections that pose major risks for community members. One such intersection is the corner of Commonwealth and Warren/Kelton Streets, which is where I live. There are two service roads, a main road, as well as the GreenLine in the center of the road. The intersection is extremely confusing for drivers, pedestrians, and cyclists. Each day, it is frequented by young people attending Brighton High and Green Academy, commuters heading into the city for work, and elders out on errands. I would like to see improved light signals and maintenance, clearer signage and road markings.
Amanda Smart
I have had a running club speak to me about how drivers do not acknowledge people crossing at crosswalks. I have noticed this when walking with individuals with canes or in wheelchairs.
3. Why do you think people who care about walking, biking, transit, and mobility issues should vote for you?
Jonathan Allen
Not only are the interests of people who care about walking, biking, transit and mobility important to me from a safety and accessibility perspective, but also from a environmental standpoint. We need to priorities alternative modes of transportation and infrastructure to reduce carbon emissions and decrease congestion. As a young and inclusive public servant, I am committed to pushing us towards innovative, equitable, and sustainable solutions that ensure residents are able to travel in our city without regard to socio-economic status.
Brandon Bowser
"It’s not lip service to me. As a cyclist, I understand the issues first-hand; it’s not an abstraction. We deserve elected officials with first hand experience navigating the city outside of a vehicle. I have been fortunate to have worked for 9 years as a pedicab driver at Boston Pedicab. I know full well the reality of cycling around the city for pleasure, profession, and as a means of commute."
Elizabeth Breadon
Of all the Allston Brighton candidates I was the only one who worked with AB Health Collaborative on establishing the Brighton Avenue Bus Lane. I have also called Boston Transportation Dept about monitoring/ticketing/towing cars that park in this lane. Having been a physical therapist for people with disabilities for most of my career I am especially sensitive to mobility challenges and potential fixes. I am also an abiding environmentalist and will do all I can to improve public transportation and bicycle safety to take as many cars as possible off our roads.
Craig Cashman
I have first hand experience working on transportation issues in this neighborhood. I took part in the early meetings where the idea of commuter rail service at Boston Landing were discussed and got to see it become a reality. I got to write a letter with my colleagues at the State House advocating for West Station now and not 2040, while also calling for Harvard University to make a significant investment towards construction. I intend to build upon Harvard's investment of $58M by pushing more public-private partnership with other institutions, Kendall Square and the Longwood medical area.
Lee Nave Jr.
I have experience working on major policy reform. I also am an active walker, biker, and MBTA user. I know first hand the importance of improving our intersections for commuters as well as ensuring we have a stable and equitable public transportation system. I will work with MassBikes, The Allston Brighton Mobility group, and the MBTA on strategic frameworks over the next few years. I will convene additional community mobility studies marketed to ensure as many community members weigh in on decisions of how this neighborhood's transportation network should function.
Amanda Smart
I believe that people should vote for me because I have a wide range of experiences dealing with Public Transportation, and know from experience the difficulty some handicapped individuals have when attempting to be independent.

Policy Proposals

1. How will you ensure implementation of the infrastructure changes needed to slow traffic on your community’s streets, and improve crosswalks and intersections to make them safer for people who are walking and using mobility assistive devices?
Jonathan Allen
Allston-Brighton is home to the first Bus/Bike Only lane in the City of Boston! This infrastructure change is the result of multiple community partners coming together to advocate and develop safer designs for traffic feasibility and mobility. I am committed to supporting efforts to expand more Bus/Bike Only lanes. I will work with stakeholders like Vision Zero Coalition, MBTA, Liveable Streets, CommonWheels, other elected officials, City/State agencies, and the Mayor to ensure that constituents' feedback is heard and prioritized in decision-making processes. Representation is key. I will work to ensure equitable representation of constituents' views, experiences, and aspirations.
Brandon Bowser
"I will support dramatically expanding and fast-tracking the Neighborhood Slow Streets program. District 9 is one of the few areas in the city that hasn’t been selected for this safe-streets program despite pressing need, especially considering the potential for increased cut-through traffic during the Allston I-90 construction. I will advocate for the rapid implementation of the North Allston Safe Streets Zone and beyond. If we’re going to tackle the lionshare of serious injuries and fatalities in our city, we’ll need to speed up implementation of street redesigns on major roadways like Comm Ave, Cambridge St, Harvard Ave, North Harvard St, Western Ave, and Chestnut Hill Ave - all of which have had a high rate of bike and pedestrian crashes in Boston. Last year, an 80-year-old was killed mid-crosswalk in a crash while crossing Comm Ave by Griggs St. These roads need to be redeveloped with the user experience in mind -- the current BU/Comm Ave situation, for example, has made it more difficult for riders during this extended construction phase. Implementing temporary fixes first with paint, flexposts, traffic signal changes, and new signage has been successful in New York."
Elizabeth Breadon
The Brighton Ave Bus lane started with a group of dedicated volunteers gathering data. My initial steps would be gathering information by holding town hall meetings on transportation, sending a Survey Monkey questionnaire to residents, asking on Twitter and Facebook, meeting with D9 BPD and BTD, asking school crossing teams and making sure residents know to call my office to report issues. Then I would work with Public Works on a priority list and schedule for short term fixes and capital repairs that need to go into the budget. Allston-Brighton has been out-of-sight and out-of-mind- for too long at City Hall.
Craig Cashman
Boston needs to begin implementing raised crossings to improve safety for pedestrians in the city of Boston but also to slow down traffic on neighborhood streets. A Raised crossing will slow down traffic on Kenrick Street at the entrance to Chandler's pond where there is currently no safe place to cross between the Newton town line and Lake Street. The rampant cut through traffic on Portsmouth St. will be slowed with a raised crossing from Waverly Apartments to the Portsmouth Street Playground. We also need to implement more pedestrian crosswalk warning systems like the one at Hano St. and Cambridge St. near the the Union Square Fire Station. This was put in place after the death of a 12 year-old BPS student and we should not wait for another tragedy to mobilize and realize these improvement. There are feature we need for improved safety for all.
Lee Nave Jr.
I will ensure full funding for all neighborhoods seeking to implement a slow-streets program. We must invest more than $5 per person on safe streets infrastructure, policies, and enforcement. If Boston is serious about saving lives and improving transit conditions, then they will fully implement Vision Zero’s priorities. In addition, I would work with the Public Works Department to improve the use of the 311 service to report such infrastructure needs. Following infrastructure requests, I would implement standard response times to such submissions regarding crosswalks, stoplight outages, and broken sidewalks, that impact our residents’ mobility. We have residents utilizing the systems that do not respond in a timely fashion.
Amanda Smart
I would seek the assistance of city individuals, and people who live with these devices. They have more knowledge of the challenges they go through, then I do.
2. How will you improve the reach, frequency, and quality of public transit in Boston?
Jonathan Allen
I will work to enhance the amount of constituent feedback received to collect more data assessing the needs regarding reach, frequency, and quality of public transit in Boston. Also, as a fellow MBTA customer, I will advocate for a more customer-centered approach to addressing and enhancing the public transit experience. My advocacy extends to ensuring public transit scheduling and design adequately responds to disproportionate accessibility, affordability, and reliability.
Brandon Bowser
"My prime concern with public transit in Boston is equitability and quality of access. A low-cost, quick, and effective change we can make as a city is to increase the use of bus-and-bike-only lanes. More than a third of Allston-Brighton residents rely on MBTA buses to navigate the city. I support the bus lane on Brighton Avenue and will push BTD to implement more in Allston-Brighton. Bus-only lanes decrease commute times for bus riders. I will also work with the MBTA and the community to increase and improve bus shelters, particularly in areas where the mobility-impaired often wait for buses. The Allston I-90 construction project must be used as an opportunity to not only improve commutes, but an opportunity to increase the quality of life for those living close to the Mass Pike. I will be a staunch advocate for building West Station early in the I-90 Allston Interchange project. I will push MassDOT and the MBTA to increase frequency of commuter rail service. It is also the perfect opportunity to electrify our commuter rail and introduce EMUs. Implementing bus-only lanes with connections to destinations downtown, Back Bay, Cambridge, and the Longwood Medical Area."
Elizabeth Breadon
First, I will ride every bus and T line I Allston Brighton, although I already have. Then, I'll collaborate with other members of the Council to publicize to problems and request upgrades in service. I will also collaborate with the Boston delegation and communicate specific needs and potential dangers to leadership at the State House and urge constituents to do the same. I believe that many squeaky wheels will get the grease.
Craig Cashman
I will always be an advocate for bringing Boston's public transit into the 21st century. We need to invest in electrifying the commuter rail, expand this service to more areas and increasing the frequency on these lines. This will relieve some of the stress put on our dated subway system, our buses and our congested roadways. I will work with state officials and be a vocal supporter of public transit in City Hall. We can no longer turn a blind eye to the MBTAs increasing issues and need to continue to be proactive when coming up with the necessary solutions. Locally we can also continue to push public-private partnership by pushing for increased shuttle service among the development community. If developer is going to promote a project as transit oriented they should be prepared to make significant investment locally in public transit.
Lee Nave Jr.
With all the new development in Allston-Brighton, we need to ensure each project has a complete MBTA plan formed before the project is developed. We have several major projects such as the Allston Yards project that will change the very landscape of our community. Though this particular project is adjacent to the MBTA Boston Landing commuter rail station, we have already witnessed this train being over-capacity during rush hour traffic. Adding potentially another thousand commuters would overburden this station. Therefore, we need to increase the number of cars and frequency of commuter rail trains coming through Boston Landing, as well as look at an additional station such as West Station to help relieve this burden. We will need to have more buses around the community that are reliably frequent during peak hours to take residents nearby to the station. We also need to have a slightly closer, and regularly re-stocked, BlueBike stations for the “last-mile” riders. Our objective would be to have as many alternatives to parking and driving as possible because already streets like Everett and North Beacon, see massive congestion.
Amanda Smart
I will be a part of as many boards, and planning committees related to Public Transport as I can.
3. How will you ensure fast-tracked implementation of a city-wide network of off-street paths and protected bike lanes on major thoroughfares and connecting streets that are safe and comfortable for people of all ages and abilities?
Jonathan Allen
Coalition building! I will work with community stakeholders to determine the best design for off-street paths and protected bike lanes. Also, to move forward more efficiently, I will bring partners together to mobilize our community so that we are able to apply pressure where necessary to raise awareness about the importance of off-street paths and protected bike lanes.
Brandon Bowser
"As a person who relies upon a bike to get around A-B and the city, I strongly support the rapid implementation of protected bike lanes. In talking with community members, students, and friends, I know that there is a huge demand for improved biking infrastructure in Boston, and traffic safety is one of the leading reasons why people don’t bike today. A-B, with its already above average rates of biking, is a critical place to invest in these improvements. I will: 1.) I will lobby BTD for developing networks - not just stand-alone corridors - that take people to and from popular and well-established biking routes like those along the Charles River or on the soon-to-be-completed Comm Ave section by BU. 2.) Push for community outreach that reflects the mobility needs of A-B. We need to be doing everything we can to receive feedback from people who are using our streets daily. I will advocate for the creation of more public outreach positions in BTD to make this possible to ensure our community is heard."
Elizabeth Breadon
I think the most effective way of accomplishing these goals is for members of the Council to work together, rather than negotiating deals for their own areas, and to enlist the mayor and the heads of Parks and Environmental Dept. I would enlist public support by asking that each BPS high school take part in designing and recommending where paths and bike lanes could go. I would use their work as part of a public relations campaign for the project.
Craig Cashman
I will continue the already on-going collaboration with mobility activists in city hall and always work to champion these improvements across multiple city agencies. As the city, but Allston Brighton in particular, moves through the current wave of development we need to call upon this community to make a significant investment in these types of infrastructure features. We need to build infrastructure for future and that begins with thoughtful and comprehensive planning.
Lee Nave Jr.
As a Program Manager with a statewide advocacy organization, I know what it takes to work in collaboration with different stakeholders to push for progressive change. In order to build comprehensive active transit infrastructure across the city and into neighboring municipalities, I will take a strong stance for prioritizing the city-wide network for bicyclists. I will lean on the grassroots efforts of MassBike, Boston Cyclists Union, LiveableStreets and others to provide data and stories, which amplify community voice on a city level, while also working within the City Council’s Committees (Planning, Development, & Transportation and Environment, Sustainability & Parks) and with city departments and executives, like the Chief of Streets, to build internal support and efficiency in implementing plans.
Amanda Smart
I would let them know how many different people this affects, and how city businesses, restaurants and stores miss out when we don't make public transportation a top priority.

Additional Questions

1. Vision Zero is an approach which aims to eliminate traffic fatalities and serious injuries and has been adopted by Boston, Cambridge, and Somerville, and many other cities across the country. Do you support the principles of Vision Zero policies and funding for their rapid implementation?
Jonathan Allen
Strongly Support
Brandon Bowser
Strongly Support
For the past few years, we’ve had a commitment to Vision Zero with not a lot of action. I’m serious about reducing traffic fatalities and will work with relevant agencies to fast-track solutions.
Elizabeth Breadon
Strongly Support
Craig Cashman
Strongly Support
I always advocate for these policies and will assist in finding additional funding at the state and federal level, but also call for more investment from the private sector.
Lee Nave Jr.
Strongly Support
Amanda Smart
Strongly Support
2. One key strategy that has been proven to effectively reduce speeding, improve safety, and remove racial bias in traffic enforcement in other states and countries is automated enforcement (i.e. speed cameras and red light cameras). Do you support S.1376, An Act relative to automated enforcement, which if passed would authorize cities and towns in Massachusetts to opt into the use of automated enforcement? To see the full text of the bill, go here.
Jonathan Allen
Strongly Support
I particularly support this Act because of its diligence in addressing racial bias in traffic enforcement.
Brandon Bowser
Somewhat Support
I’m wary of facial recognition technology and where it’s taking our police forces. There is no place in society for racial bias by the police and we need better solutions for addressing this than technology. I am encouraged by the bold steps Somerville has taken to bar facial recognition in public spaces.
Elizabeth Breadon
Strongly Support
Craig Cashman
Strongly Support
Lee Nave Jr.
Somewhat Support
I agree that our streets must become safer for pedestrians. Reducing and enforcing the speed limit are critical to reach this goal. However, I would want to ensure that stored camera data is protected in the age of facial recognition software and privacy concerns.
Amanda Smart
Strongly Support
I have witnessed this in Italy, and have seen people that acknowledge it.
3. Do you support implementation of all of the Better Bike Corridors and other bike projects in the Go Boston 2030 Plan, and making sure all short-term projects are planned and implemented within three years, and long-term projects are implemented by or before 2030?
Jonathan Allen
Strongly Support
Brandon Bowser
Strongly Support
We’ve seen the damage done by long-term projects whose delayed implementation has actually made roads more dangerous (Comm Ave). As a cyclist, I’m extremely supportive of Better Bike Corridors to encourage mode shift away from single-occupant cars.
Elizabeth Breadon
Strongly Support
Craig Cashman
Strongly Support
Lee Nave Jr.
Strongly Support
Amanda Smart
Strongly Support
4. Do you support creating age-friendly walking conditions in your community -- an issue raised by many seniors as critical to their ability to “age in community”? If yes, how?
Jonathan Allen
Strongly Support
I believe bike lanes are one way that we free up the sidewalks so that those walking are not put in harms way. This positively benefits seniors.
Brandon Bowser
Strongly Support
Making District 9 a more pleasant place to walk is not hard, it just requires someone with a plan and the motivation to organize the relevant parties to get it done. Increasing tree cover and adding benches would make walking and taking breaks more pleasant. Increasing the amount of time pedestrians have to cross streets is crucial to seniors’ safety, as is slowing traffic on neighborhood streets. Much of this could be accomplished by pushing for the completion of Neighborhood Slow Streets projects in Allston-Brighton.
Elizabeth Breadon
Strongly Support
Walk lights near senior housing should be slowed down in response to the Walk Button so seniors can safely cross a street. Faint crosswalks need repainting and portable Crosswalk signs should be placed in crosswalks on busy streets. BPD and BTD should be a presence and be willing to stop and cite drivers to drive through crosswalks while people are trying to cross. The Council should hold a hearing on this issue at which people can try to use crutches or a cane and get a sense of what it takes to cross Chestnut Hill Ave at Cleveland Circle, for example.
Craig Cashman
Strongly Support
Assuring that our senior are able to age in community is something that is important to me because I have many senior family members in Allston Brighton. We have to assure that pedestrian infrastructure is adequate for the safety of all and this includes seniors.
Lee Nave Jr.
Strongly Support
Allston/Brighton may be known for the many college students who make a home in our community while studying, but 13% of our neighborhood’s residents are over 65 and we have multiple retirement communities. I believe Boston should implement policies that would create mobility for all. I have studied the 8 80 Cities frameworks and know that investment in public spaces that are suitable for 8 year olds and 80 year olds, benefit all residents.
Amanda Smart
Strongly Support
I would attempt to have walkways near nursing homes or hospitals.
5. Do you support the restriction of on-street parking during rush hour in order to create dedicated bus lanes on certain major thoroughfares where bus riders experience significant delays due to traffic congestion?
Jonathan Allen
Strongly Support
Brandon Bowser
Strongly Support
Though it didn’t necessitate the removal of on-street parking, I fully supported and still support the Brighton Avenue bus lane, and would support further efforts to decrease delays for bus riders even if it means that a few people can’t store their private property on a public roadway for a few hours.
Elizabeth Breadon
Strongly Support
Yes, yes, a thousand times yes.
Craig Cashman
Strongly Support
Lee Nave Jr.
Strongly Support
We have seen success already in the first week of having the Brighton Avenue bike lane in Allston, and I would hope to expand this to routes 64 and 27 as well as have a similar lane in the outbound direction along Brighton Ave.. It will significantly cut down on commute times and encourage ridership for both our buses and bikes.
Amanda Smart
Strongly Support
6. Do you support exploring new ways of raising revenue to provide Boston with more tools to improve conditions for people walking, using mobility assistive devices, biking, and using public transit (e.g. increasing the gas tax, implementing congestion pricing, increasing fees on Uber/Lyft)? If yes, please give examples that interest you.
Jonathan Allen
Strongly Support
Gas tax and congestion pricing.
Brandon Bowser
Strongly Support
"More than half of all 2017 ride-share trips in Massachusetts were in Boston alone, adding more congestion to our streets. I support An Act to Reduce Traffic Fatalities, and encourage shared rides, a bill that would empower municipalities to collect local taxes on trips in addition to state taxes. Under the proposed legislation, the municipalities in the MBTA service area could impose a congestion assessment of at most $2.25 per ride during regular MBTA service hours. This is one of many sensible ways to raise more revenue that can be invested in promoting walking, biking, and public transit."
Elizabeth Breadon
Strongly Support
I am keenly aware of the thousands of drivers that come into Boston to work at large nonprofits that do not pay the relatively small Payment in Lieu of Taxes the City asks for. Also, institutions have fleets of cars, trucks and buses that are particularly hard on our roads. Thousands of drivers use Boston roads for medical appointments to come to museums or sporting events. Institutions collect a steady stream of money in their parking garages. I would explore many formulas for collecting money from all of them to improve Boston transit conditions.
Craig Cashman
Strongly Support
Lee Nave Jr.
Strongly Support
Boston recently took first place for US city traffic in a study done by INRIX. In order to improve conditions for all who navigate the city, we must create funding streams to improve active transit infrastructure & public transportation to encourage people to leave their cars at home, or not buy one in the first place. In order to do so, I would support congestion pricing and work with other municipalities and the state legislature to effectively collect more toll revenue during rush hour.
Amanda Smart
Strongly Support
increasing gas tax, and parking meters.
7. Do you support the rollout of dynamic parking meter pricing in business districts, which would increase meter rates during periods of increased demand, to free up on-street parking and reduce cars “cruising” for open spaces?
Jonathan Allen
Somewhat Support
Brandon Bowser
Somewhat Support
By and large the people who drive on a daily basis in the city of Boston are well above the city’s median income. If we are going to implement dynamic parking meter pricing across the city of Boston, I would love to see it done in a manner in which the money stays local and used specifically for that neighborhood. For example, street improvements like trees, trash cans, sidewalk repairs, and street-calming infrastructure.
Elizabeth Breadon
Strongly Support
Craig Cashman
Strongly Support
I would support dynamic meter pricing to free up spaces but we also need to implement "Parking Benefit Districts" in Boston to retain some of the revenue in the business districts. This revenue could be used to make necessary improvements in the area such a repainting bike/bus lanes/crosswalks or fixing damaged sidewalks.
Lee Nave Jr.
Strongly Support
Amanda Smart
Somewhat Support
8. Boston has many traffic signals that do not work well for pedestrians. Do you support making signal timing safer, easier, and more convenient for people walking and using mobility assistive devices at all paces?
Jonathan Allen
Strongly Support
Brandon Bowser
Strongly Support
"There are many intersections in District 9 that do not allow adequate time for street crossings. I look forward to working with the City to fix this. There is a high percentage of young people in our neighborhoods and we also have residents with visual impairment, who need safe, protected, and accessible crossing conditions. The RFB (rapid flash beacon) pedestrian signal on Cambridge Street by Union Square was installed after a child was killed walking across the street. We should look at where we need safer crossings and work to implement them."
Elizabeth Breadon
Strongly Support
Craig Cashman
Strongly Support
Lee Nave Jr.
Strongly Support
Amanda Smart
Strongly Support
9. Do you support charging an annual fee for residential parking permits?
Jonathan Allen
Somewhat Support
Brandon Bowser
Somewhat Support
Elizabeth Breadon
Strongly Support
$25 per permit with exclusions for elderly and people with handicaps.
Craig Cashman
Somewhat Support
The issue with resident parking from the beginning has been enforcement. From Cleveland Circle to Brighton Center municipal lots, you'll see cars parked for days with out of state plates. People who register their car in Boston and pay excise tax directly into the city coffers should be able to park on city streets and near their homes. What's not fair is getting permits for multiple cars and using streets as a personal parking garage. I would support imposing a modest permit fee for a second vehicle registered at a specific address and fees that escalates steeply for additional vehicles.
Lee Nave Jr.
Strongly Support
Amanda Smart
Strongly Support
10. Do you support reducing or eliminating MBTA fares for people with low income?
Jonathan Allen
Strongly Support
Brandon Bowser
Strongly Support
Elizabeth Breadon
Strongly Support
Reducing or eliminating MBTA fares for people with low incomes will help them get to and from work which helps them, employers, and the economy.
Craig Cashman
Somewhat Support
I do not believe that now is the time to eliminate fares for riding the MBTA but would support fare reduction programs for certain communities in need.
Lee Nave Jr.
Strongly Support
Amanda Smart
Strongly Support
I support reducing, not eliminating.
11. Do you support ensuring large-scale developments (including Sullivan Square, the Allston I-90 Interchange, and Suffolk Downs) incorporate the community's desire for walkability, connectivity, open space, and resiliency?
Jonathan Allen
Strongly Support
Brandon Bowser
Strongly Support
Developments should be based around multimodal mobility, not just car mobility. We should emphasize foot traffic so that people don’t have to drive around the corner to get a carton of milk.
Elizabeth Breadon
Strongly Support
There should be no question about this in any large development.
Craig Cashman
Strongly Support
We need to assure that the "People's Path" becomes a reality and that the vision of the community is realized.
Lee Nave Jr.
Strongly Support
Amanda Smart
Strongly Support